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CHAPTER III. CEREMONIES AND DISTINCTIONS.

I. Royal Salutes and Flags.
II. Diplomatic Salutes.
III. Salutes to Military Authorities.
IV. Salutes to Officers.
V. Salutes to Governors, &c.
VI. Salutes in India.
VII. Salutes to Foreigners not of Royal Families.
VIII. Salutes in General.
IX. Distinguishing Flags.
X. Distinguishing Pendants.
XI. Colours - Navy.
XII. Colours - Not Navy.
XIII. Military Honours.
XIV. "The Victoria Cross."
XV. Foreign Orders and Medals.
XVI. Uniform.


§ I. - ROYAL SALUTES AND FLAGS.

1.

All Royal Salutes are to consist of 21 Guns.

2.

Whenever the Queen shall arrive at any place in the British dominions where there is a Fort or Battery from which Salutes are usually fired a Royal Salute shall be fired from such Fort or Battery, and from all the Ships and Vessels of War present; and similar Salutes shall be fired upon Her Majesty's final departure, and on such other occasions as shall be directed.

Also, whenever the Queen shall go on board any Ship of War, the Royal Standard shall be hoisted at the main-top-gallant-mast-head, the Flag of the Lord High Admiral at the fore-top-gallant-mast-head, and the Union Jack at the mizen-top-gallant-mast-head of such Ship, or, if on board of a small Vessel, in the most conspicuous parts of her; and a Royal Salute shall be fired from such Ship or Vessel, on Her Majesty's going on board, and again on leaving her: and every Ship of War present shall likewise fire a Royal Salute on the hoisting of those flags; and such further Royal Salutes shall be fired on Her Majesty quitting the Ship or Vessel, or passing in boats, or on such other occasions as may be directed.

Also, whenever the Queen shall be embarked in any Ship or Vessel at sea, and the before-mentioned Flags shall be hoisted in her, every Ship of War meeting her shall fire a Royal Salute.

And whenever any Ship or other Vessel, in which the Flags before-mentioned are flying, shall pass any Fort or other place from which Salutes are usually fired, a Royal Salute is to be fired from such Fort or other place; but whenever any Ship or Vessel passes, bearing the Royal Standard only (without the other Flags), such Fort or other place is not to Salute such ship or Vessel.

3.

The Standards of their Royal Highnesses the Prince Consort and the Prince of Wales are to be treated with the same respect, and saluted in the same manner, when displayed in any of Her Majesty's Ships, as the Royal Standard of Great Britain.

4.

Whenever any other members of the Royal Family shall arrive at, or quit, any place where there is a Fort or Battery, from which Salutes are usually fired, they shall receive a Royal Salute, on their first arrival and final departure, from such Fort or Battery, and from all Her Majesty's Ships and Vessels present.

Also, whenever any member of the Royal Family shall go on board any of Her Majesty's Ships or Vessels, the Royal Standard (or the Standards of their Royal Highnesses the Prince Consort or the Prince of Wales, as the case may be), shall be hoisted at the main-top-gallant-mast-head of such Ship or Vessel, and a Royal Salute shall be fired from her, on such member of the Royal Family going on board, and again upon leaving her.

Also, whenever any member of the Royal Family shall be embarked in any Ship or Vessel at sea, and the Royal Standard (or the Standards of their Royal Highnesses the Prince Consort or the Prince of Wales), shall be hoisted in her, every Ship and Vessel of War meeting her shall fire a Royal Salute.

5.

Whenever any of Her Majesty's Ships may arrive at a Port, or pass the immediate neighbourhood of a place, where the Royal Standard is flying on shore, marking the presence of Her Majesty at such Port or place, they are to fire a Royal Salute.

6.

The Royal Standard, and the Standards of their Royal Highnesses the Prince Consort and the Prince of Wales, do not return Salutes, and no other Flag is to be saluted in the presence of those Standards.

7.

Whenever any foreign Crowned Head, Sovereign Prince or his Consort, or President of a Republican State, shall arrive at or quit any place in Her Majesty's dominions, where there is a Fort or Battery from which Salutes are usually fired, they shall receive a Royal Salute on their first arrival at, and final departure from, such Fort or Battery, and from all Her Majesty's Ships present; and upon their going on board, and on leaving any of the said Ships, a similar Salute shall be fired, and on each occasion during the Salute the senior Officer's Ship shall display at her main-top-gallant-mast-head the Flag of the nation or state of such Crowned Head, Sovereign Prince, or his Consort, or President.

8.

Whenever any Prince, member of a foreign Royal Family, shall arrive at any of our Ports, or visit any of Her Majesty's Ships, the same Salutes shall be fired and compliments be paid to them as to the members of the Royal Family of England, as directed by Art. 4, displaying the Flag of the nation of such foreign Prince in lieu of our Royal Standard.

Whenever such visits to Her Majesty's Ships shall take place in a foreign port, corresponding Salutes shall be fired, and the Flag of the nation of the Royal Visitors shall be hoisted, as already explained,

Upon occasion of the celebration of the birth-day of the King or the Queen of a foreign nation, or on other important festivals and ceremonies of such nation, by any Ships of War or Batteries of such nation, Her Majesty's Ships present may, under the direction of the senior Officer, fire such Salutes in compliment thereto, as are fired by the Ships or Batteries of the foreign nation, not, however, exceeding 21 guns, and the Flag of such nation shall be displayed on these occasions at the main-top-gallant mast-head of the senior Officer's Ship. Salutes so fired will not be returned to Her Majesty's Ships.

9.

The fixed days for firing Salutes as celebrations of Anniversaries shall be as follows, viz.:-
The Anniversaries of the Birth, the Accession, and the Coronation of the reigning Sovereign;
Birth-day of the Consort of the reigning Sovereign;
on which days a Royal Salute shall be fired at noon from all Her Majesty's Ships in Port, and at 1 P.M., from all the Forts and Batteries from which Triumphal Salutes are usually fired.

Excepted from this regulation are the Salutes usually fired at the Tower and at St. James's on the above occasions, as also are the Salutes on the opening, proroguing, or dissolving of Parliament by Her Majesty; or, on Her Majesty's going anywhere in procession; which Salutes are to continue as heretofore, or as Her Majesty may please to command.

10.

Whenever any of Her Majesty's Ships may be in immediate proximity with the Court on the Anniversary of the birth of a Member of the Royal Family, it shall be celebrated by a Royal Salute being fired by such Ships.

11.

The Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland shall be entitled to receive from the Forts and Batteries within his Vice-Royalty, a Royal Salute; and, on being fallen in with afloat, within three leagues of any part of the coast of Ireland, the Ship in which he is embarked having the Irish Standard flying, or on his Excellency's visiting any of Her Majesty's Ships within, the said limits, he is to be saluted with a Royal Salute.

§ II. - DIPLOMATIC SALUTES.

 SCALE.
Ambassadors Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary19 Guns.
Envoys Extraordinary and Ministers Plenipotentiary, and Envoys, Ministers, and others accredited to Sovereigns (with the exception of such Ministers as are accredited in the specific character of "Minister Resident")15 "
Ministers Resident, Diplomatic Authorities below the rank of Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, and above that of Charge d' Affaires13 "
Charge d'Affaires, or Subordinate Diplomatic Agents left in charge of Missions11 "
Consuls-General, or British factories9 "
Consuls7 "

Whenever any Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary shall arrive at, or depart from, any place in Her Majesty's dominions where there are Forts or Batteries from which Salutes are usually fired, he shall be saluted with the number of guns specified against his rank in the scale, Section II; and if an Ambassador shall embark on board of one of Her Majesty's Ships in an official capacity, he shall also be saluted by such Ship, according to the said scale, on his going on board, and (should he proceed to sea in her,) also on his finally leaving her; and the same may be observed in a foreign port or colony.

2.

An Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, and Envoys, Ministers, and others accredited to Sovereigns (with the exception of such Ministers as are accredited in the specific character of "Minister Resident"), shall be entitled to be saluted with the number of guns specified against their rank in the scale, Section II, but they shall be entitled only to the compliment when within the precincts of the Nation to which they are accredited; and, consequently, when they proceed in a Ship of War, they are only to be saluted by such Ship on their quitting her, after her arrival at their destination; and, whenever they shall visit in their official capacity any of Her Majesty's Ships within the precincts of the territories to which they are accredited, they are to be saluted by such Ships with the number of guns specified against their rank in the scale; but if they visit several of Her Majesty's Ships at the same port, on the same day, they shall be saluted only by one of them; and, although their visit to any of Her Majesty's Ships may be repeated, they shall be saluted by the same Ship, in the same port, only once in twelve months; but, when they shall embark on the final termination of their Mission, they shall be entitled to the same number of guns from any of Her Majesty's Ships which may be ordered to receive them.

The foregoing regulations are to be applicable also to the other Diplomatic Authorities of lower rank than that of Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, differing only in the number of guns with which they are to be saluted, as stated against their ranks in the scale.

3.

It is to be understood that Salutes, in conformity to the foregoing regulations, shall be fired in compliment (from either Forts or Ships), to those Foreign Diplomatic Authorities only whose Nations pay the same compliments to Her Majesty's Diplomatic Ministers in their territories.

4.

Her Majesty's Consuls-General, or Consuls, or the Members of a British Factory, shall be saluted with the number of guns mentioned against their rank in the scale, Section II, on their going on board, or on their leaving any one of Her Majesty's Ships, but this is to be done only in the foreign Ports to which they respectively belong, and only once in twelve months from the same Ship, and to the same person.

§ III. - SALUTES TO MILITARY AUTHORITIES.

 SCALE.
The Lord High Admiral, or the Lords Commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Admiral, - or the Commander-in-chief of, or the Officer Commanding-in-chief, the whole Army of the United Kingdom19 Guns.
The First Lord Commissioner of the Admiralty15 "

1.

Whenever the Lord High Admiral, or the Lords Commissioners for executing the office of the Lord High Admiral, - or the Commander-in-chief of, or the Officer Commanding in-chief, the whole of the Army of the United Kingdom, - shall arrive in their official capacities at any place in Her Majesty's dominions, where there are Forts or Batteries from which Salutes are usually fired, they are to be saluted with the number of guns specified against their respective ranks in the scale, Section III, and such further Salutes shall be fired from the Fort or Battery, at their departure, as may be directed; and the said authorities, on going on board any one of Her Majesty's Ships in their official capacities, shall be saluted by the said Ship only with the number of guns mentioned in the scale; and on their leaving her, such further Salutes shall be fired as may be directed; but if they visit several Ships at the same Port, on the same day, they are to be saluted on going on board by only one.

In the event of the Flag of the Lord High Admiral being hoisted on board one of Her Majesty's Ships, it is to be saluted by the Ship of the senior Officer present, according to the scale, also by any Ship, or by the Ship of the senior Officer of any Squadron of Her Majesty's Ships arriving at the Port where the said Flag shall be so flying; likewise on any Ship carrying the said Flag, being met at sea by any of Her Majesty's Ships, similar Salutes are to be fired by them; and on the arrival of a Ship carrying the said Flag, at any Port in Her Majesty's dominions, the Ship of the senior Officer present shall fire a similar Salute.

No Flag of a Flag Officer is to be saluted in the presence of the Flag of the Lord High Admiral, when flying afloat.

2.

Whenever the First Lord Commissioner of the Admiralty shall arrive in his official capacity at any place in Her Majesty's dominions, where there is a Fort or Battery from which salutes are usually fired, or on going on board any of Her Majesty's Ships, he shall be entitled to be saluted by such Fort or Ship with the number of guns specified against his rank in the scale, Section III; and if he should embark in one of Her Majesty's Ships for the purpose of proceeding on a voyage in performance of public service, he shall be entitled to receive a Salute of the same number of guns, both on his going on board and on his finally quitting the said ship.

§ IV. - SALUTES TO OFFICERS.

 SCALE.
Field-Marshals or Admirals of the Fleet17 Guns.
Admirals or Generals15 "
Lieutenant-Generals or Vice-Admirals13 "
Rear-Admirals or Major-Generals11 "
Brigadier-Generals or Commodores9 "
Return Salutes to Captains of the Navy and Officers of inferior rank7 "

Note. - While any of the above-mentioned hold Commissions as Commanders-in-chief, or Commanders of the Land Forces of a Station, they shall be entitled to be saluted with two guns more than specified in the scale, against their respective ranks.

1.

Whenever any of the Naval Officers specified in the scale, Section IV, in actual employment, land for the first time, in any place in Her Majesty's dominions where there are Forts or Batteries from which Salutes are usually fired, they are to be saluted with the number of guns specified against their ranks in the scale; and when any Officer of the Army, specified in the same scale, being in actual employment, shall officially visit or embark in one of Her Majesty's Ships, he shall likewise be saluted by that ship with the number of guns specified against his rank in the scale, either on going on board, or on quitting the said Ship; but if he should go on board more than one Ship in the same Port, he shall be saluted only by one of them, but these Salutes are not to be repeated to the same Officer, Military or Naval, oftener than once in twelve months, abroad, and in the United Kingdom, once in three years, unless the Officer in question shall, in the meantime, have received advancement of rank, in which case he may be again saluted by the Fort or Ship, as the case may be, according to the scale prescribed for his new rank.

These Salutes, being personal, are not to be returned.

2.

Whenever the Flag of an Admiral of the Fleet shall be hoisted, it shall be saluted by the Ship present, bearing the Flag or Pendant of the Officer next in seniority to him, with the number of guns specified in the scale, Section IV.

3.

Whenever an Admiral, a Vice-Admiral, Rear-Admiral, or a Commodore shall hoist his Flag or his Broad Pendant, on his appointment, or shall change his Flag or Broad Pendant on his promotion (he being the senior Officer present), the Ship bearing the Flag or the Pendant of the Officer next in seniority to him only shall salute with the number of guns to which his Flag or his Broad Pendant may be entitled, according to scale, Section IV; or being a junior Officer, he shall salute the senior present; but no interchange of Salutes shall take place on the re-hoisting of a Flag or Broad Pendant between Officers who shall have already exchanged Salutes within twelve months, and no other Ships, whether bearing Flags or Broad Pendants, or private Ships, present on any occasion of such Salutes being fired, shall salute, except under the circumstances hereinafter explained.

4.

Whenever a Flag Officer or a Commodore shall join or meet a senior Officer for the first time (except a Commodore meeting a senior Captain who may not be a Commodore), he shall salute such senior Officer with the number of guns to which he may be entitled, according to the scale, Section IV.

5.

If there be more than one Flag Officer, or Commodore, in Squadrons joining or meeting, the Ship only of the senior Flag Officer, or of the senior Commodore of each Squadron shall salute the Flag Officer, or the Commodore, who may be the senior Officer to all present.

6.

Whenever any Ship of War shall join or meet a Flag Officer or a Commodore for the first time, she shall salute such Flag Officer or Commodore (if the latter be a senior Officer) with the number of guns to which he may be entitled; but if more than one ship shall, at the same time, join or meet a Flag Officer, or a Commodore and the said Ships shall be under the orders of a senior Officer in command of one of them, such senior Officer only shall salute the Flag or the Broad Pendant (if the Commodore be his superior); but if the said Ships shall be under separate and distinct orders then a Salute shall be fired by each of them.

7.

Whenever a junior Officer shall salute the Flag of the Lord High Admiral, or of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, or of any Flag Officer, or the Broad Pendant of a Commodore, a Salute shall be fired in return of the number of guns to which the rank of the Officer who saluted shall be (if a Flag Officer or a Commodore) entitled according to the scale, Section IV. If the Officer saluting be of the rank of Captain, or of inferior rank, the return Salute shall be seven guns, as specified in the scale. When more than one Flag Officer, Commodore, Captain, Commander, or Lieutenant commanding shall salute, one Salute shall be fired in return, as an answer to the whole, consisting of the same number of guns as the Officer receiving the Salute is entitled to; but no Flag Officer nor Commodore shall be saluted more than once during the period of his command by the same Flag Officer, Commodore, Captain, Commander, or Lieutenant commanding any one of Her Majesty's Ships, except on the occasion of a change of Flags or of Broad Pendants on a promotion.

8.

No Captain, Commander, or Lieutenant, nor any other Officer commanding one or more of Her Majesty's Ships shall salute an Officer under the rank of a Commodore or Brigadier-General, in Her Majesty's Navy or Army in any part of the world.

9.

When Flag Officers, Commodores, Captains, or other Officers commanding shall be saluted by Merchant Ships (either British or Foreign), they shall return five guns to a single Merchant Ship, and seven to several ships.

This Article is to apply to all private Ships saluting not being in Her Majesty's Navy.

10.

Her Majesty's Ships and Her Majesty's Forts and Castles are not, on any account, to exchange Salutes in any part of Her Majesty's Dominions.

11.

At the Funerals of General and Flag Officers, of Commodores and Brigadier-Generals, dying upon service, Minute Guns are to be fired whilst the body is proceeding to the place of interment, but these Minute Guns are not to exceed the number to which the Officer's rank entitled him when living.

There shall, moreover, be fired, after the body is deposited in the grave, or in the sea, a Salute of cannon, amounting to the same number of guns as the deceased Officer was entitled to when living; and in the event of a General or Flag Officer dying afloat, and who is to be buried on shore, where there is a Fort, Minute Guns are to be fired from the Ship whilst the body is being conveyed to the shore; and after the body is landed Minute Guns are to be fired by the Fort whilst the funeral procession is moving from the landing-place to the place of interment; the Minute Guns, both from the Ship and the Fort, shall not exceed twice the number of guns the Officer was entitled to when living.

12.

At the Funeral of a Captain or Commander of one of Her Majesty's Ships, such number of Minute Guns as the Commanding Officer present shall direct (not, however, exceeding twenty) shall be fired by the Ship he commanded, or to which he belonged, beginning to fire when the body is put into the sea, or when it is put off from the Ship to be carried on shore. If the Ship be alone the Officer succeeding to the command shall order this to be done.

Cannon are not to be fired at the Funerals of Officers subordinate to the above ranks, or of Civil Officers.

13.

At the Funeral of a Lieutenant, Master, Sub-Lieutenant, or Second Master, or of a Civil Officer of corresponding or higher rank, of any of Her Majesty's Ships, three volleys of musketry shall be fired over the grave, or over the body when put into the sea; and at the Funeral of Warrant or Subordinate Officers, one Volley.

§ V. - SALUTES TO GOVERNORS, &c..

 SCALE.
The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports19 Guns.
The Governors of Her Majesty's Colonies, Foreign Possessions, Castles, or Fortresses (within the precincts of their Governments)17 "
Lieutenant-Governors of Her Majesty's Colonies, Foreign Possessions, Castles, or Fortresses within the precincts of the said Governments (if administering Government)13 "

1.

The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports is to be saluted by the Forts within his jurisdiction, with the number of guns specified in the scale, Section V, and as heretofore has been the practice.

2.

All Governors, or Lords High Commissioners, of Her Majesty's Colonies, Foreign Possessions, Castles, or Fortresses (including Her Majesty's Lord High Commissioner of the Ionian Islands), shall be entitled to a Salute of the number of guns specified against their rank in the scale, Section V, but they shall be entitled to this compliment only within the precincts of their Governments; consequently, when they proceed in a Ship of War from the United Kingdom, they are only to be saluted by such ship on their quitting her after arriving at their several destinations. A Governor, on his first landing in his Government, shall be entitled to be saluted from the Fort or Battery with the number of guns before specified, and again on his final departure, at the expiration of his Government; and he shall be further entitled to be saluted by such other Forts or Dependencies of his Government as he may visit in his official capacity, but these latter Salutes shall be repeated at each place only once in twelve months.

If he shall visit, within the precincts of his Government, any one of Her Majesty's Ships, he shall be saluted by the said Ship, with the same number of guns, cither on his going on board, or on his leaving her; but if he shall visit on the same day several Ships in the same Port, he shall be saluted by only one of them; and although his visits to the same ship may be repeated, he shall be saluted by her only once in twelve months at each Port or Colony within the precincts of his Government; but when he shall embark on the final termination of his Government, he shall be entitled to be saluted with the same number of guns from any of Her Majesty's Ships which may be ordered to receive him.

When Governors, or Lieutenant-Governors, quit their Governments on leave of absence, they shall be entitled to the same Salutes on their departure, and on their return to their Governments, as they would have been entitled to on their first assuming them, or on their final departure from them.

3.

Lieutenant-Governors not administering the Government are to be entitled to be saluted with the number of guns specified against their rank in the scale, Section V; but they are only to receive this compliment on their arrival at the seat of Government, and on their finally quitting it, and only from the Forts or Batteries at the seat of Government.

They are to be saluted also by the Ship of War from which they disembark, and by such Ship of War also as they may embark in, on their final departure.

4.

The Union Flag or Jack being the distinctive Flag or Mark of an Admiral of the Fleet when displayed at the main-top-gallant-mast-head, and ordered by these Instructions to be saluted accordingly, being likewise one of the Flags which is to designate the presence of the Queen on board of a ship, when it may be displayed at another mast-head, and all ships or vessels, other than Her Majesty's ships or vessels, being interdicted from displaying the said Flag, by "The Merchant Shipping Act, 1854," the said Union Flag or Jack is not, on any account, to be displayed at either mast-head of any ship or vessel, in consequence of any Governor or Lieutenant-Governor of any of Her Majesty's Possessions or Fortresses being on board such ship or vessel, but a Flag having a Crown on it, or having the Arms of the Colony on it, may be substituted to denote the presence of the Governor or Lieutenant-Governor on board any vessel in the precincts of his Government.

5.

Civil Functionaries shall have, at their funerals, the same number of guns fired as Minute Guns, while the procession is going to the burial-ground, as they were entitled to as Salutes when living.

Civil Functionaries, not entitled to Salutes of cannon when living, are to have no guns fired at their funerals.

§ VI. - SALUTES TO EUROPEAN FUNCTIONARIES, APPLICABLE IN THE TERRITORIES UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF THE GOVERNMENT OF INDIA, AND WITHIN THE INDIAN SEAS.

 SCALE.
The Viceroy and Governor-General of India21 Guns.
Ambassadors19 "
Governors of Presidencies17 "
The President of the Council of India17 "
Governors of Her Majesty's Colonies17 "
Lieutenant-Governors of Provinces in India15 "
Members of Council15 "
Plenipotentiaries and Envoys15 "
Lieutenant-Governors of Her Majesty's Colonies15 "
Agents to the Viceroy and Governor-General13 "
Residents13 "
Chief Commissioners of Provinces and Commissioners13 "
Political Agents and Charges d'Affaires11 "

1.

The Viceroy and Governor-General of India shall be entitled to receive a Royal Salute from the Forts and Batteries within the Indian Territories, and from Her Majesty's Ships on being fallen in with afloat within the Indian Seas, and on visiting any of Her Majesty's Ships within those limits.

2.

Whenever an Ambassador, a Governor of a Presidency, or the President of the Council of India, shall arrive at, or depart from, any place within the Indian Territories where there are Forts and Batteries; - and also whenever an Ambassador, a Governor of a Presidency, or the President of the Council of India, shall visit, embark on board, or disembark from, any one of Her Majesty's Ships within the Indian Seas, - he shall be saluted by the Fort or Ship, as the case may be, with the number of guns specified in the scale.

3.

Governors of Her Majesty's Colonies, Lieutenant-Governors of Provinces in India, Lieutenant-Governors of Her Majesty's Colonies, Agents to the Viceroy and Governor-General, Residents, Chief-Commissioners of Provinces, and Commissioners, shall be entitled to be saluted with the number of guns specified for their rank in the scale, by the Forts and Batteries within their respective jurisdictions, and when on duty elsewhere in the Territories under the authority of the Government of India; - and when they shall visit, embark on board, or disembark from any one of Her Majesty's Ships within the jurisdiction of their respective Governments.

4.

Members of Council in India shall be entitled to be saluted with the number of guns specified in the scale, by the Forts and Batteries within their respective Presidencies, - and when they shall visit, embark on board, or disembark from any one of Her Majesty's Ships within the same limits.

5.

Plenipotentiaries and Envoys, and Political Agents and Charge's d'Affaires shall be entitled to be saluted with the number of guns specified in the scale, by the Forts and Batteries within the precincts of the territories to which they are accredited, - and when they shall visit, embark on board, or disembark from any one of Her Majesty's Ships within the said precincts.

6.

Officers of the Navy and Army shall be saluted in India, according to their respective ranks, with the number of guns specified, and under the regulations laid down, in Section IV, relative to Salutes to Officers. And Officers of Her Majesty's Indian Military and Naval Forces shall be saluted, according to their rank, in the same way as Officers of Her Majesty's Army and Navy.

7.

The Viceroy and Governor-General of India has power, in cases in which he may deem it expedient to authorize Salutes, to issue local regulations for the guidance of the authorities in Indian Limits with respect to Civil or Military Officers holding Positions or Commands not included in the foregoing scale.

§ VII. - SALUTES TO FOREIGNERS NOT OF ROYAL FAMILIES.

1.

If a Foreigner of high distinction, or a Foreign Flag or General Officer, shall visit any one of Her Majesty's Ships, he may be saluted on his going on board, or on leaving the Ship, with such number of guns as, from his rank, may be deemed proper; not, however, exceeding 15, unless a British Officer corresponding rank shall have been saluted by a Ship of the nation of such Foreigner with a greater number, in which case an equal number may be fired, but never exceeding 19 guns. Her Majesty's Officers are not to expect personal Salutes of this nature to be returned.

The Captain of a Foreign Ship of War may also be saluted with nine guns, on his visiting one of Her Majesty's Ships, if such compliment shall have been paid to the Captain of one of Her Majesty's Ships on his visiting a Ship of the nation to which such Foreign Ship may belong; but if he never had an opportunity of visiting such Foreign Ship of War, he is nevertheless at liberty to pay the compliment to the Foreign Captain, and to return the personal Salute from any Foreign Ship.

In all cases the Flag of the nation of such Foreigner shall be hoisted during the Salute at the fore-top-gallant mast-head.

2.

Officers commanding Her Majesty's Ships on visiting Foreign Ports are to ascertain the number of guns with which such places have usually been saluted, and they are to salute with that number of guns, on receiving assurance that the Salute will be returned gun for gun, but such salutes are not to exceed 21 guns. In the event of there being already in the Port a senior Officer of Her Majesty's Ships, his directions on the subject are to be followed: but if several Ships or Vessels shall arrive together, the senior Officer only of them shall salute.

3.

All Salutes from Ships of War of other nations either to Her Majesty's Forts or Ships, are to be returned gun for gun.

4.

A British Ship of War meeting at sea a foreign Ship of War bearing the Flag of a Flag Officer, or the Broad Pendant of a Commodore, commanding a Station or Squadron, and superior in rank to the Officer of the British Ship, shall salute such Foreign Flag Officer or Commodore with the number of guns to which a British Officer of corresponding rank is entitled, upon being assured of receiving in return gun for gun; and in the event of the British Ship meeting with such Foreign Flag Officer or Commodore in a Foreign Port, similar complimentary Salutes with such Foreign Flag Ship should be observed, if the regulations of the place shall admit thereof.

5.

Her Majesty's Ships shall not, on any account, lower their top-gallant-sails, nor their Flags, to any Foreign Ships whatsoever, unless the Foreign Ships shall first, or at the same time, lower their top-gallant-sails or their Flags to them.

§ VIII. - SALUTES IN GENERAL.

1.

None of the Salutes authorized by these instructions shall be fired from Ships of War without due communication, by signal or otherwise, being made to the Naval Commanding Officer present, except in cases of Salutes in compliment to such Commanding Officer himself.

2.

Such of the authorities mentioned in the foregoing instructions as may, from their rank and appointments, be entitled to be saluted in more than one capacity, shall be saluted under that rank which shall entitle them to the greatest number of guns, but on no occasion is the same individual to be saluted in more than one capacity.

3.

None of Her Majesty's Ships, with less than 10 guns, are to fire a Salute that may require the reloading of the guns, unless under circumstances when such omission cannot be explained to prevent giving offence to a Foreign Power, or a Foreign Officer.

4.

No other Salutes than those authorized by the foregoing Regulations are to be allowed, except that upon any important occurrence, such as a great victory gained by Her Majesty's Arms, or other highly advantageous national event, the Governor, or Officer commanding any of Her Majesty's Possessions abroad, may, in conjunction with the senior officer of Her Majesty's Naval Service on the spot, direct such Salutes to be fired as the occasion may seem to them to require; but, unless the Officers in command of both Services concur in the propriety of such Salutes being fired, they are not to take place by one Service only.

The Governors of Colonies are, however, authorized to continue to sanction such Salutes as may have been customary, and which they may deem right and proper at religious ceremonies, and further, to cause the usual Salutes to be fired at the opening and closing of the Houses of Parliament or Assembly, but these Salutes are in neither of the above cases to exceed 19 guns.

5.

The ammunition for all Salutes authorized by the foregoing instructions shall be supplied by Her Majesty's War Department at the public charge; but, in the event of guns being fired to enforce Quarantine or Port Regulations, where there may be Local Laws authorizing the recovery of the cost of the ammunition used for such purpose, the amount is always to be recovered and paid to the respective Officers of the War Department at the place.

6.

No Salutes shall be fired from Her Majesty's Ships before sunrise or after sunset, unless under the special directions of the senior Officer present; and when it may be necessary to salute on Sundays, care shall be taken not to do so, unless on extraordinary occasions, during those hours that are usually appropriated to the performance of Divine Service in the Churches on shore.

§ IX - DISTINGUISHING FLAGS.

1.

The Lord High Admiral's Flag is to be worn on board of any of Her Majesty's Ships in which the Lord High Admiral, or the Commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Admiral, shall embark.

2.

The Flag of the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland is to be worn on board any of Her Majesty's Ships in which his Excellency shall embark within the Irish waters, or in St. George's Channel.

3.

The Union Flag is to be worn by an Admiral of the Fleet at the main-top-gallant-mast-head, as his proper Flag.

4.

A plain Red Flag is to be worn by Admirals, Vice-Admirals, and Rear-Admirals of the Red, at the main, fore, or mizen-top-gallant-mast-heads, respectively, as their proper Flag.

5.

A White Flag, with a Red St. George's Cross in it, is to be worn by Admirals, Vice-Admirals, and Rear-Admirals of the White, at the main, fore, or mizen-top-gallant-mast-heads, respectively, as their proper Flag.

6.

A plain Blue Flag is to be worn by Admirals, Vice-Admirals, and Rear-Admirals of the Blue, at the main, fore, or mizen-top-gallant-mast-heads, respectively, as their proper Flag.

7.

When Flag Officers shall think fit to carry their Flags at the head of their boats, or in Tenders, or small Vessels having only one mast, they shall wear the following Flags to distinguish their Ranks, viz.:-

The Admiral of the Fleet, and the Admirals of the Red, White, and Blue, shall wear their proper Flag; Vice-Admirals of the Red and Blue their proper Flag, but with one White Ball in it; and Vice-Admirals of the White their proper Flag, with one Blue Ball in it.

Rear-Admirals of the Red and Blue their proper Flag, with two White Balls; and Rear-Admirals of the White their proper Flag, with two Blue Balls in it. The Balls to be large enough to be easily distinguished, and to be in the Upper part of the Flag, and near the Staff.

When Vice and Rear-Admirals have their Flags painted on their boats, the same distinctive Balls, of at least two inches in diameter, are to be inserted on them.

8.

When two Flag Officers, carrying the same Flag at the same masthead, shall serve together, the Admiralty, or the Commander-in-chief of the Fleet in which they may be serving, may order either of them to wear, temporarily, such other Flag as may be deemed expedient for the sake of distinction; but this temporary circumstance is not to affect their proper rank and command.

§ X. - DISTINGUISHING PENDANTS.

1.

A plain Red Broad Pendant, or a White Broad Pendant with a Red Cross in it, is to be worn by Commodores of the First Class; but when more than one such Commodore shall be present, the senior only shall wear the Red Pendant, and the other, or others, the White Pendant.

2.

A Blue Broad Pendant is to be worn by Commodores of the Second Class.

3.

All Her Majesty's Ships in Commission, when not distinguished by a Flag or Broad Pendant, are to wear a Long Pendant, having a St. George's Cross on a White Field in the upper part next to the mast, with a Fly entirely of the colour of the Ensign.

§ XI. - COLOURS - NAVY.

1.

The following Ensigns are to be worn by Her Majesty's Ships in Commission according to the Flag of the Flag Officer, or the Broad Pendant of the Commodore, under whose orders they are serving, or in whose presence they may be, or as circumstances may authorize; and with Union Jacks at the bowsprit end, when it shall be thought proper to display them.

A Red Ensign, with an Union in the Upper Canton.
A White Ensign, with a Red St. George's Cross in it, and with an Union in the Upper Canton.
A Blue Ensign, with an Union in the Upper Canton.

The Union Jack, with a border of White, of one-fifth of the Jack, shall be used in all parts of the world as a Pilot Flag.

Her Majesty's Ships, when at anchor in Home Ports and Roads, shall hoist their Colours at 8 o'clock in the morning, from 25th March to 20th September inclusive, and at 9 o'clock from 21st September to 24th March inclusive, but when abroad, at 8 or 9, as the Commander-in-chief shall direct; and they shall be kept flying (if the weather permit, or the senior Officer present see no objection thereto) throughout the day until sunset; they are then to be hauled down, the sentinels firing their muskets. And whenever a Ship shall come to anchor, or got under way, if there be sufficient light for her Colours to be seen, they are to be hoisted, though earlier or later than aforesaid; also on her passing, meeting, joining, or parting from, any other of Her Majesty's Ships; and, unless there should be sufficient reason to the contrary, on her falling in with any other ship or ships at sea, - or when in sight of and near the land, especially when passing or approaching Forts, Castles, Batteries, Lighthouses, or Towns.

2.

No Flag Officer or Captain shall carry any other Flag or Pendant than that which belongs to his rank, except when Her Majesty, or any of the Royal Family, or the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, may be on board; or when directed so to do by the Admiralty, or by his superior Officer.

§ XII. - COLOURS - NOT NAVY.

1.

All Ships and Vessels belonging to Her Majesty's subjects, shall wear a Red Ensign, with the Union in the Upper Canton next to the Staff; and shall use a British Union Jack, with a border of White, of one-fifth of the Jack, as a Pilot Flag, in all parts of the world; except such Yachts or other Vessels as may have Warrants from the Admiralty to display other Ensigns, Colours, or Pendants.

2.

Ships and Vessels, employed in the service of any public office, shall carry the said Red Ensign, and a small Red Flag with a Union described in a Canton, at the upper corner thereof, next to the staff, as a Jack, but in the centre of such Ensign and Jack, there shall be described the Seal or Badge of the office to which they belong. Hired Troop or Store Ships, when in charge of a Commission Officer, shall wear, in addition, a Red Pendant with the Admiralty Badge at the upper part next to the mast. Commission Officers, serving with the permission of the Admiralty as Mail Agents in Contract Vessels, may, when in their boats, wear therein a similar Red Pendant; but, when such Pendant is displayed, the Ensign, with the Seal or Budge of the office to which the Vessel belongs, must also be displayed in the boat.

3.

With the foregoing exceptions, the Flags, Pendants, and Jacks appointed to be worn by the ships of the Royal Navy, shall not be hoisted or worn on board any other ships or vessels whatsoever; nor shall the Masters of such other Ships and Vessels hoist or wear any Flags, Ensigns, Pendants, or Jacks made in imitation of, or resembling those appointed to be worn by Ships of the Royal Navy (excepting as hereinbefore directed), nor any kind of Pendant whatsoever, nor what may be taken for such; and if they shall offend herein, and shall presume to hoist or wear any Flags resembling those worn by Her Majesty's Ships, or any other Colours than those hereinbefore specified, or any kind of Pendant whatsoever, it is Her Majesty's pleasure that the Captains, or any other Officers of Her Majesty's Ships of War, who shall see them, do seize such Colours, Flags or Pendants, and report the name of the Master, and of the Ship or Vessel, the place to which she belongs, and of the merchant who is owner of her, to the Secretary of the Admiralty; transmitting also affidavits of two witnesses to the fact, in order that the person so offending may be proceeded against according to law. (Vide "Merchant Shipping Act, 1854," section 106; and Part 10, "Legal Procedure.")

4.

The Captains and Commanders of Her Majesty's Ships shall not suffer any foreign Ship to ride in Her Majesty's Ports or Roads with False Colours; but if any foreign ship shall persist in carrying them, they are to send an account thereof to the Secretary of the Admiralty.

§ XIII. - MILITARY HONOURS.

1.

An Admiral of the Fleet, or an Admiral, or a Commander-in-chief being a Flag Officer or a Commodore of the First Class, shall be received on board any of Her Majesty's Ships by a Guard of Marines, or Land Forces serving as such, commanded by a Captain, where there be one; the Officers saluting, Drums and the Band playing a March, with Arms presented.

2.

A Vice-Admiral, not being a Commander-in-chief, shall be received by a Guard of Marines, or Land Forces serving as such, commanded by a Captain; the Officers saluting, the Drums beating three ruffles, with Arms presented, and the Band playing a March.

3.

A Rear-Admiral, not being a Commander-in-chief, shall be received by a Guard of Marines, or Land Forces serving as such, commanded by a Subaltern; the Officer saluting, Drums beating two ruffles with Arms presented, and the Band playing a March.

4.

A Commodore, not being a Commander-in-chief, or the Captain of a Fleet, (provided there be no Captain senior to him in a ship present,) shall be received by a Guard of Marines, or Land Forces serving as such, commanded by a Subaltern; the Officer saluting, the Drum beating one ruffle, with Arms presented, and the Band playing a March.

5.

A Captain may be received by a Sergeant's Guard of Marines, or of Land Forces serving as such; Captains, and Commanders also, when attending at Courts-Martial, and on occasions requiring them to be in Full Dress, are to be received by a Sergeant's Guard.

6.

The above marks of respect are equally to be paid to Officers on Half-Pay, according to their respective ranks, when they go on board any of Her Majesty's Ships, provided they appear in their proper uniforms.

7.

When a Flag Officer or a Commodore with his Flag or Broad Pendant hoisted in his Boat or Tender, may be passing by a Ship, the Guard shall turn out, and the Drums shall beat as directed in the preceding Articles; and similar honours shall be paid to the Captain of a Fleet, in passing a Ship, provided there be no Captain senior to him present. (On such occasion the Captain of the Fleet may wear in his boat a Broad Pendant, according to his rank; but not if there be a senior Captain to him present.)

8.

Officers of the Royal Marines, and of Her Majesty's Land Forces, being in their proper uniforms, shall be received on board any of Her Majesty's Ships with the same honours and respect as are above directed to be paid to Officers of corresponding rank in the Navy.

9.

Her Majesty hath also directed, that in all Her Forts and Garrisons, the Officers of Her Majesty's Navy, being in their proper uniforms, shall have the same honours and respect from the Troops as the Officers of corresponding rank in the Army; but Officers of the Civil Branch are not to be saluted with cannon, nor received by Garrison, Regimental, or Ship Guards; - in all other respects, however, they are entitled to the same Military Honours as Officers of corresponding rank in the Military Branch.

10.

When a Flag Officer or a Commodore shall have his Flag or Broad Pendant flying in any Port or Roadstead in Her Majesty's dominions, or in one of Her Majesty's Colonies or Foreign Possessions, he may fire from his Ship a Morning and an Evening Gun, as hereinafter explained. If more than one Flag Officer or Commodore be present, the senior only may fire a gun, and the others in succession shall each fire a volley of musketry; and from all other Ships, when in any Ports or Roadsteads as above, whether in the presence or not of a Flag Officer or Commodore, the sentinels shall fire their muskets. Immediately after the Morning Gun is fired, the Reveille shall be beaten, and for a quarter of an hour previous to the firing of the Evening Gun, the Tattoo also, in every Ship present; and the same may be done in Foreign Ports if the regulations of the place shall admit thereof.

On Home Service, the Morning Gun shall be fired at daybreak; and the Evening Gun, at nine o'clock, from the 25th of March to the 20th of September inclusive, and at eight o'clock from the 21st September to the 24th of March inclusive; but on Foreign Service, as the Commander-in-chief on the Station shall direct.

§ XIV. - "THE VICTORIA CROSS."

The following is a copy of the rules and ordinances of the Naval and Military Decoration, designated "The Victoria Cross:" -

"VICTORIA R.

"Whereas, We, taking into Our Royal consideration that there exists no means of adequately rewarding the individual gallant services either of Officers of the lower grades in Our Naval and Military Service, or of Warrant and Petty Officers, Seamen, and Marines, in our Navy, and Non-commissioned Officers and Soldiers in Our Army; and whereas the Third Class of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath is limited, except in very rare cases, to the higher ranks of both Services, and the granting of medals, both in Our Navy and Army, is only awarded for long service or meritorious conduct, rather than for bravery in action or distinction before an enemy, such cases alone executed where a general medal is granted for a particular action or campaign, or a clasp added to the medal for some especial engagement, in both of which cases all share equally in the boon, and those who by their valour have particularly signalised themselves remain undistinguished from their comrades. Now, for the purpose of attaining an end so desirable as that of rewarding individual instances of merit and valour, We have instituted and created, and by these presents, for Us, Our Heirs, and Successors, institute and create a New Naval and Military Decoration, which We are desirous should be highly prized and eagerly sought after by the Officers and Men of Our Naval and Military Services, and are graciously pleased to make, ordain, and establish the following rules and ordinances for the government of the same, which shall from henceforth be inviolably observed and kept:-

"Firstly. It is ordained, that the distinction should be styled and designated 'The Victoria Cross,' and shall consist of a Maltese Cross of Bronze, with Our Royal Crest in the centre, and underneath which an escroll, bearing this inscription, 'For Valour.'

"Secondly. It is ordained, that the Cross shall be suspended from the left breast, by a blue riband for the Navy, and by a red riband for the Army.

"Thirdly. It is ordained, that the names of those upon whom We may be pleased to confer the Decoration shall be published in the 'London Gazette,' and a registry thereof kept in the office of Our Secretary of State for War.

"Fourthly. It is ordained, that any one who, after having received the Cross, shall again perform an act of bravery, which, if he had not received such Cross, would have entitled him to it, such further act shall he recorded by a Bar attached to the riband by which the Cross is suspended, and for every additional act of bravery an additional Bar may be added.

"Fifthly. It is ordained, that the Cross shall only be awarded to those Officers or men who have served Us in the presence of the enemy, and shall have then performed some signal act of valour, or devotion to their country.

"Sixthly. It is ordained, with a view to place all persons on a perfectly equal footing in relation to eligibility for the Decoration, that neither rank, nor long service, nor wounds, nor any other circumstance or condition whatsoever, save the merit of conspicuous bravery, shall be held to establish a sufficient claim to the honour.

"Seventhly. It is ordained, that the Decoration may be conferred on the spot where the act to be rewarded by the grant of such Decoration has been performed, under the following circumstances:-

"I. When the Fleet or Army, in which such act has been performed, is under the eye and command of an Admiral or General Officer commanding the Forces.

"II. Where the Naval or Military Force is under the eye and command of an Admiral or Commodore commanding a squadron or detached naval force, or of a General commanding a corps, or division, or brigade; on a distinct and detached service, when such Admiral, Commodore, or General Officer shall have the power of conferring the Decoration on the spot, subject to confirmation by Us.

"Eighthly. It is ordained, where such act shall not have been performed in sight of a Commanding Officer as aforesaid, then the claimant for the honour shall prove the act to the satisfaction of the Captain or Officer commanding his ship, or to the Officer commanding the regiment to which the claimant belongs, and such Captain or such Commanding Officer shall report the same through the usual channel to the Admiral or Commodore commanding the force employed on the service, or to the Officer commanding the forces in the field, who shall call for such description and attestation of the act as he may think requisite, and on approval shall recommend the grant of the Decoration.

"Ninthly. It is ordained that every person selected for the Cross, under rule seven, shall be publicly decorated before the Naval or Military force or body to which he belongs, and with which the act of bravery for which he is to be rewarded shall have been performed, and his name shall be recorded in a General Order, together with the cause of his especial distinction.

"Tenthly. It is ordained that every person selected under rule eight shall receive his Decoration as soon as possible, and his name shall likewise appear in a General Order, as above required, such General Order to be issued by the Naval or Military Commander of the Forces employed on the service.

"Eleventhly. It is ordained that the General Orders above referred to shall from time to time be transmitted to our Secretary of State for War, to be laid before Us, and shall be by him registered.

"Twelfthly. It is ordained that as cases may arise not falling within the rules above specified, or in which a claim, though well founded, may not have been established on the spot, We will, on the joint submission of Our Secretary of State for War and of Our Commander-in-chief of Our Army, or on that of Our Lord High Admiral or Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty in the case of the Navy, confer the Decoration, but never without conclusive proof of the performance of the act of bravery for which the claim is made.

"Thirteenthly. It is ordained that, in the event of a gallant and daring act having been performed by a squadron, ship's company, a detached body of Seamen and Marines, not under fifty in number, or by a brigade, regiment, troop, or company, in which the Admiral, General, or other Officer commanding such forces, may deem that all are equally brave and distinguished, and that no special selection can be made by them; then, in such case, the Admiral, General, or other Officer commanding, may direct, that for any such body of Seamen or Marines, or for every troop or company of Soldiers, one Officer shall be selected by the Officers engaged for the Decoration; and In like manner one Petty Officer or Noncommissioned Officer shall be selected by the Petty Officers and Non-commissioned Officers engaged; and two Seamen, or Private Soldiers, or Marines shall be selected by the Seamen, or Private Soldiers, or Marines, engaged respectively, for the Decoration; and the names of those selected shall be transmitted by the Senior Officer in command of the Naval force, brigade, regiment, troop, or company, to the Admiral or General Officer commanding, who shall in due manner confer the Decoration as if the acts wore done under his own eye.

"Fourteenthly. It is ordained that every Warrant Officer, Petty Officer, Seaman, or Marine, or Non-commissioned Officer or Soldier, who shall have received the Cross shall, from the date of the act by which the Decoration has been gained, be entitled to a Special Pension of Ten Pounds a-year, and each additional Bar conferred under the rule four on such Warrant or Petty Officers, or Non-commissioned Officers or Men, shall carry with it an Additional Pension of Five Pounds per annum.

"Fifteenthly. In order to make such additional provision as shall effectually preserve pure this most honourable distinction, it is ordained, that if any person on whom such distinction shall be conferred, be convicted of treason, cowardice, felony, or of any infamous crime, or if he be accused of any such offence and doth not after a reasonable time surrender himself to be tried for the same, his name shall forthwith be erased from the registry of Individuals upon whom the said Decoration shall have been conferred by an especial Warrant under Our Royal Sign Manual, and the Pension conferred under rule fourteen shall cease and determine from the date of such Warrant. It is hereby further declared that We, Our Heirs and Successors, shall be the sole judges of the circumstances demanding such. expulsion: moreover, We shall at all times have power to restore such persons as may at any time have been expelled, both to the enjoyment of the Decoration and Pension.

"Given at Our Court at Buckingham Palace, this twenty-ninth of January, in the nineteenth year of Our reign, and in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six.

"By Her Majesty's Command,
"PANMURE."

§ XV. - REGULATIONS RESPECTING FOREIGN ORDERS AND MEDALS.

FOREIGN ORDERS.

1.

No Subject of Her Majesty shall accept a Foreign Order from the Sovereign of any foreign country, or wear the Insignia thereof, without having previously obtained Her Majesty's permission to that effect, signified by a Warrant under Her Royal Sign Manual.

2.

Such permission shall not be granted to any Subject of Her Majesty, unless the Foreign Order shall have been conferred in consequence of active and distinguished Service before the Enemy, either at Sea or in the Field; or unless he shall have been actually and entirely employed, beyond Her Majesty's dominions, in the Service of the Foreign Sovereign by whom the Order is conferred.

3.

The intention of a Foreign Sovereign to confer upon a British Subject the Insignia of an Order, must be notified to Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, either through the British minister accredited at the Court of such Foreign Sovereign, or through His Minister accredited at the Court of Her Majesty.

4.

If the service for which it is proposed to confer the Order has been performed during war, the notification required by the preceding Clause must be made not later than two years after the exchange of the Ratifications of a Treaty of Peace.

If the service has been performed in time of Peace, the Notification must be made within two years after the date of such service.

5.

After such Notification shall have been received, Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs shall, if the case comes within the conditions prescribed by the present Regulations, and arises from Naval or Military Services before the enemy, refer it to Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the War Department, previously to taking Her Majesty's pleasure thereupon, in order to ascertain whether there be any objection to Her Majesty's permission being granted.

A similar reference shall also be made to the Commander-in-chief, if the application relates to an Officer in the Army, or to the Lords of the Admiralty, if it relates to an Officer in the Navy.

6.

When Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs shall have taken the Queen's pleasure on such application, and shall have obtained Her Majesty's permission for the person in whose favour it has been made to accept the Foreign Order, and wear the Insignia thereof, he shall signify the same to Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department, in order that he may cause the Warrant, required by Clause I, to be prepared for the Royal Sign Manual.

When such Warrant shall have been signed by the Queen, a Notification thereof shall be inserted in the Gazette, stating the service for which the Foreign Order has been conferred.

7.

The Warrant signifying Her Majesty's permission may, at the request and at the expense of the person who has obtained it, be registered in the College of Arms.

8.

Every such Warrant as aforesaid shall contain a Clause providing that Her Majesty's Licence and Permission does not authorize the assumption of any style, appellation, rank, precedence, or privilege appertaining to a Knight Bachelor of Her Majesty's Realms.

9.

When a British Subject has received the Royal permission to accept a Foreign Order, he will at any future time be allowed to accept the Decoration of a higher Class of the same Order, to which he may have become eligible by increase of rank in the Foreign Service, or in the Service of his own country; or any other distinctive mark of honour strictly consequent upon the acceptance of the original Order, and common to every person upon whom such Order is conferred.

10.

The preceding Clause shall not be taken to apply to Decorations of the Guelphic Order which were bestowed on British Subjects by Her Majesty's predecessors, King George IV, and King William IV, on. whose heads the Crowns of Great Britain and of Hanover were united.

Decorations so bestowed cannot properly be considered as rewards granted by a Foreign Sovereign for services rendered according to the purport of Clause 2 of these Regulations. They must be rather considered as personal favours bestowed on British Subjects by British Sovereigns, and as having no reference to services rendered to the Foreign Crown of Hanover.

FOREIGN MEDALS.

11.

Application for permission to accept and wear Medals which, not being the decoration of any Foreign Order, are conferred by a Foreign Sovereign on British Subjects in the Army or in the Navy, for Military or for Naval Services, should be addressed, as the case may be, to the Commander-in-chief, or the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, who, if they see fit, may submit the same to Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, for Her Majesty's sanction; upon obtaining which, they may grant such permission without any other formality.

12.

Permission to wear a Foreign Medal cannot be granted to a British Subject, unless such Medal is bestowed for Military or Naval Services performed by the command or with the sanction of Her Majesty. But no permission is necessary for accepting a Foreign Medal, if such Medal is not to be worn.

§ XVI. - UNIFORM.

1.

The Officers, Men, and Boys of Her Majesty's Fleet and Royal Marines shall wear such Uniform Clothing as the Admiralty shall, in pursuance of Her Majesty's pleasure, from time to time, direct. (A description of the uniform to be worn by the Officers and Men of the Fleet will be published from time to time in the Navy List.)

2.

Every Officer in the Fleet, from the time of his joining a Squadron or Ship to which he shall be appointed, to that of his being removed from it, shall wear the Uniform established for Officers of his Rank or Station, except when he shall have leave from the Admiralty, or the Commander-in-chief, to be absent from his duty, or when he shall have express permission from his Commanding Officer to appear without it, which is never to be granted, unless he may have leave to quit the Port or Road where the Ship to which he belongs shall be anchored; and Commanders-in-chief and Commanding Officers on the spot are charged to have this regulation obeyed.

3.

Full Dress is always to be worn on State occasions, by all Naval and Marine Officers.

4.

On all occasions of Full Dress, Officers on the Home Stations shall wear white trousers, over boots, between the 23rd of April and 14th October; and blue trousers between the 15th October and the 22nd April. In Undress Uniform, white trousers are to be worn between the 23rd April and 14th October, unless the senior Officer present shall order otherwise.

5.

Officers employed abroad are to wear white or blue trousers, as may be directed by the senior Officer present, according to the nature of the climate in which they may be serving.

6.

On arrival at Foreign Ports, or when meeting with Foreign Officers or Foreign Functionaries, and visits of ceremony are to be exchanged, Naval Officers shall wear the Undress Coat with Epaulettes: the same shall also be worn at Courts-Martial, and on other occasions of ceremony for which the Full Dress Uniform is not prescribed. On all ordinary occasions of duty, such as waiting on senior or superior Officers, Surveys, Examinations of Candidates, &c., Naval Officers shall wear the Frock-coat, Cap, and Sword of their respective ranks.

7.

All Naval Officers, when on shore, or on duty, in Full Dress, or in an Undress Coat with Epaulettes, are to wear the cocked hat and sword of their respective ranks.

8.

Officers, when in mourning, are to wear a piece of black crape round the left arm, above the elbow.


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