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The Queens Regulations and the Admiralty Instructions - 1861


CHAPTER XLI.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMMANDERS-IN-CHIEF.

I. General Service.
II. Civil Establishments.
III. Command at Home Ports.

§ 1.—RELATIVE TO GENERAL SERVICE.

1.

An Officer, when appointed to command a Fleet or Squadron, is to obtain, as soon as possible, the most correct information of the state of the Ships under his orders, the number and qualities of their crews, and the discipline observed in them, the quantity of stores and provisions on board, and, in general, the fitness of the Ships for the service for which they may be intended. He is to acquaint himself also with the skill, capacity, and information of their Captains, that he may be able to select, for particular services, those best qualified, by their respective abilities or local knowledge, to perform them. He is to use every exertion to complete, expeditiously, the equipment of the Fleet or Squadron, and is to keep it in the most perfect condition for service that circumstances will admit; and if he discover any deficiencies in the supplies, or any defects in the Ships, that may render them unfit for the service for which they are destined, he is to represent the same to the proper department, or, if necessary, to the Admiralty.

2.

On arriving within the limits of his command, he is to lose no time in placing himself in communication with the Governors or commanding Officers of Her Majesty's Settlements or Fortresses within the extent of his Station, as also with Her Majesty's Ministers or Consuls residing at places within or bordering on the same, - understanding that he is generally to afford to them, or any of them, such ready aid and co-operation in all matters for the benefit of the Queen's Service, as they may from time to time require from him, or circumstances may call for, and which may be in his power consistently to afford to them.

3.

On assuming the command of a Station or Squadron, he is to forward to the Admiralty a copy of the printed standing orders which he may issue for the guidance of the Officers serving under him; and a copy of each fresh edition of such orders is also to be transmitted; but Commanders-in chief who adopt the printed standing orders of their predecessors, are to acquaint the Secretary of the Admiralty of their having done so, and they need not in that case furnish copies of the same on assuming the command, because it may be presumed that they are already in office.

4.

He is to take every convenient opportunity of exercising the Ships under his command in the general evolutions of a Fleet, as well as in gunnery practice.

A scrupulous adherence to the instructions in the Signal Books relative to Fleet sailing being indispensable, in order that Ships may act in concert, and avoid delays, accidents, and dispersion, - he is, when at sea, and in company with other Ships, to insist that the order in which it may be deemed proper to place the Ships shall be maintained, without relaxation, by day and by night.

The amount of general exercise necessary for the perfect efficiency of the Squadron must rest on his judgment, and will, of course, depend upon the state of the Ships. He will be careful to impress on all Officers in command under him, that divisional exercises, patient instruction, and stationing, are the foundations of a silent and seamanlike performance of every evolution; and, moreover, that the general drill of those men who are already perfect in the various duties required of them, should, as a rule, be confined to such times and occasions as may be requisite to keep up their knowledge and activity.

5.

He is not, without authority from the Admiralty, nor without some exigency of the public service, to send beyond the limits of his station, any Ship under his orders; nor to send to England, nor to any place beyond the limits of his station, any Flag Officer under his command, unless it be necessary to detach a Squadron on some particular service, or unless some very urgent necessity require that such Flag Officer should be so removed from the Station; the cause of which he is, by the first opportunity, to report in detail to the Secretary of ths Admiralty.

6.

On a Ship being placed under his orders, he is to take the earliest convenient opportunity of inspecting her, and at the end of every twelve months afterwards, and immediately before her departure from the station, he is, if the service on which he is employed will admit of it, to inspect her again, reporting the result of such inspections to the Admiralty, in the form given in the Appendix. He is to direct the Commanders of Squadrons or Divisions to perform the above duty in his absence, or one of the senior Officers present when the service will not admit of his doing it himself, requiring them to forward their reports of the same, through him, for transmission to the Admiralty.

In addition to these periodical inspections, which are chiefly for the information of the Admiralty, the Commander-in-chief will, as often as he may deem requisite, either go himself or send a senior Officer to the ships of his Squadron, to inspect them. The reports of these intermediate inspections need not be forwarded to the Admiralty, unless, from circumstances, the Commander-in-chief should deem it expedient to transmit them.

Officers on detached service, will inspect the Ships under their orders, occasionally, and report the result to their Commanders-in-chief.

7.

The Commander-in-chief, at least once in six months, is to go himself, or to send a Commander of a Squadron or Division, or a senior Captain, who is to take with him a Paymaster, or an experienced Assistant Paymaster, on board the Ships in Port, to muster their Crews, to see that all entries, discharges, and notations of absence are correctly inserted in the books, that the Men and Boys are properly rated according to their qualifications, and to the stations in which they are respectively employed, and that the books and accounts in each department are regularly kept, and have been duly rendered, as prescribed by the instructions appertaining to them.

A statement of the muster is to be entered in the Ship's Muster Table for insertion in the Quarterly Victualling List, a copy of such statement being forwarded for the information of the Commander-in-chief, when the duty of mustering shall have been performed by a senior Officer; and any irregularity in the books and accounts, or delay in rendering them, and all instances of Men or Boys being improperly rated, are to be specially reported to the Commander-in-chief, - if necessary, for the information of the Admiralty.

Officers employed on detached service are to muster the Crews of the Ships under their orders in the manner before prescribed, and to forward statements thereof to their Commanders-in-chief by every available opportunity.

8.

When any Men or Boys are represented, in writing, to a Commander-in-chief, to be objectionable persons to retain, that is to say, altogether incapable of learning their duties, or of becoming useful to the service, he may, after due inquiry, and satisfying himself that such representations are well founded, order the discharge of such Men or Boys from Her Majesty's Service, provided they be not in debt to the Crown, reporting the circumstances to the Admiralty.

9.

When any of the Petty Ollicers and Seamen of the Ships under his command are entitled to their discharge, under the conditions of the Acts 5th and 6th William IV, chapter 24, and 16th and 17th Victoria chapter 69 (such Petty Officers or Seamen having signified their wish no longer to continue in the service), he is to grant the necessary authority for their discharge, provided the emergencies of the public service do not require their detention.

10.

When it shall be found necessary to remove or discharge Officers, Petty Officers, Seamen, Marines, or Boys, from one Ship to another, or to the shore, he is to direct the Captain to whom he gives an order for that purpose to comply with the Acts of Parliament, the Queen's Regulations and the Admiralty Instructions respecting such removal or discharge.

11.

He is to correspond, regularly, with the Admiralty, - and with the War Office, on matters relating to the duties of Military Storekeepers, - informing the Secretaries of all the orders he may give with respect to their several departments, except such as have reference only to the ordinary supplies of Stores and Provisions. He is also to inform them of any neglect he may observe in the Officers employed; and to point out to them any improvements which his observations may enable him to suggest.

12.

He is to transmit, by every convenient opportunity, an account of the proceedings of the Fleet or Squadron under his command, in the form of a general letter to the Secretary of the Admiralty; but this, his general report, is not to supersede the necessity of his writing separate letters on separate subjects.

13.

He is to transmit the following reports and returns to the Secretary of the Admiralty, as opportunities offer:

i.A general return of the Treasure received on Freight on board the Ships under his ordersTo 30th June and 31st December, of each year.
ii.Copy of the Journal of the proceedings of the Fleet or Squadron under his commandTo the last day of each Quarter.
iii.Duplicate reports of Survey on Stores or Provisions, - Vouchers for purchases, &c., -for the departments of the Admiralty and the War Department (except such as he may deem it necessary to forward at once)To the last day of each Quarter.
iv.A return of the number of Petty Officers, Seamen, and Marines in each Ship whose period of service has expired, but who are detained in consequence of special emergencies of the public service (This return is not required where there are no men so circumstanced.)
NOTE. Separate returns are required for Marines.
To the last day of each Month.
v.An abstract of the reports of the state and condition of the Ships under his commandOn the first day of each month.
vi.A return of the number of Men and Boys required to complete the complements of the Ships of the SquadronDitto
vii.A report of the number and disposition of the Ships under his commandOn the 1st day of each mouth.
viii.A return of all the Officers promoted, appointed, or removed by him in the Ships under his orders, or in any other ShipsBy every proper opportunity.
ix.A report of the number, description, and distribution of all Foreign Vessels of War which may come to his knowledge; and more particularly of all intelligence he may obtain of the movements or intentions of an enemy; and of all other circumstances worthy of noticeDitto
x.Acknowledgment of all orders and letters received by him from the Admiralty; and of all telegraphic messages received, with the replies thereto. (The time of receiving such messages and of sending the replies is to be noted)By every proper opportunity
xi.Reports of the Inspection and of the preparation for battle of the Ships under his commandDitto.
xii.The particulars of all additions or changes which may occur in the Tenders under his orders, and the names of the Ships to which they are attachedFrom time to time; for the Accountant-General.

The account of the Commander-in-chief's postage and other contingent expenses is to be made up to the last day of each Quarter, - and for the broken period to the date of the Commanmder-in-chief striking his Flag, - and the amount thereof will be repaid to the Commander-in-chief, under his own order, by the Paymaster of the Flag Ship. The account itself is to be delivered to the Paymaster, and by him transmitted as a voucher to his cash account.

14.

He is as far as circumstances will admit, to keep the Admiralty acquainted with his intended movements, specifying from time to time to what parts of the station he wishes his despatches to be forwarded, - and by what conveyance, where there is more than one route or means of communication.

15.

In every case of am Assistant Paymaster being appointed to that charge of Paymaster's stores abroad, the Commander-in-chief is, before actually conferring the appointment, to require and receive from him a letter containing his personal Bond and proposing Sureties, and to forward the same, together with a notification of the appointment, by the earliest conveyance, to the Admiralty. In the event of the Officer so appointed not being on the spot, the Captain of the Ship to which he belongs is to receive from him the above-mentioned letter and bond before delivering such appointment, and the said Captain is to forward the same, by the first opportunity, to the Commander- in-chief.

16.

As considerable expense must at all times be incurred in sending Stores and Provisions to Foreign Stations, and as many difficulties may arise during war to retard or prevent their arriving, the Commander-in-chief is to enjoin all the Captains under his command to take the greatest care of the Provisions, to use the utmost frugality in that expenditure of the Stores, and not to forward applications for surveys on them until they are really worn out or unfit for service. When condemned for the purposes for which they were originally supplied, they are to be converted to any use for which they may still be fit.

In addition to the instructions which are issued for the guidance of the Captains and several Officers in charge on this head, he is to adopt such further measures as he may deem necessary to insure the careful husbanding of the Stores and Provisions, in order that all unnecessary and wasteful expenditure may be avoided, and that his Fleet or Squadron may be kept in condition for active service, although prevented by untoward circumstances from receiving the usual supplies.

17.

When he sends any of the Ships of his Fleet or Squadron to England, he is to direct their Commanders to return into store, or to transfer to such Ships of the Squadron as he may think fit, all the Stores and Provisions on board, exceeding the quantity necessary for their voyage, unless he may see reason for acting otherwise, observing that the powder and shot are not to be reduced in any Ship below 30 rounds for each broadside gun, and 150 rounds for each revolving gun, even in time of peace; and he is also to cause the remains of public money in the hands of the Paymaster to be returned to a resident Naval Accountant, if there be one at the place, or transferred to the Paymaster of some Ship remaining on the station. And he is to send home in such Ships the invalids and others of the Squadron entitled to passage, all unserviceable stores, and whatever else, by being so carried, might prevent the expense of Transports, or of freight in Merchant Ships.

18.

When any Ship or Vessel, prize to any part of the Squadron, is to be purchased, particular care is to be taken that, as far as may be practicable, no person interested in the capture be employed in the survey or appraisement of her; and the Commander-in-chief, when he orders a prize ship to be purchased (which he is never to do unless the pressing exigency of the service requires it), is to direct that only three-fourths of the appraised value be paid to the Agents of the captors: the remaining fourth part is to be reserved until the Admiralty shall have either approved of the appraised value, or made such deductions from it as they shall think necessary.

19.

In Ports where Hospitals or Sick Quarters are established (except those Hospitals to which Captains are appointed Superintendents), he is frequently to cause the Captains under his command to visit them; to satisfy themselves as to the attention and general conduct of the Medical Attendants, and to inspect the state of the men, their lodging, clothes, bedding, food, &c., and to report to him the result of their inquiries and inspections; stating particularly whether the persons of the sick, their apartments, clothes and bedding, be clean, their food good, and their nurses attentive. They are to be instructed, also, to attend to the complaints of the Patients, if they have any to make, and, if they observe any neglect or mismanagement, to represent the same to him; and, when his other duties will admit of it, he is himself occasionally to visit the Hospitals and Sick Quarters within his Station.

20.

If the unloading of Store Ships, or if any works in a Foreign Yard, shall require more men than are usually employed there, the Commander-in-chief, whenever the duties of the Fleet or squadron will admit of it, is, upon the requisition of the Superintendent, to order as many men as may be required to be sent from the Ships to be employed on those services.

21.

He is not to authorize any Boats or Vessels being hired for the use of the Fleet, or Squadron, either at sea, or in Port, unless it be absolutely necessary; but he is to see that on all occasions the supplies of Stores and Provisions be carried on board, and all other services performed, by the boats of the Fleet or Squadron, or by those of the Dockyard. But if there be at any time an absolute necessity for hiring Boats or Vessels, he is to mention, in the order he gives for that purpose, the service they are required to perform, and the reasons for hiring them in addition to, or instead of, employing the boats of the Squadron.

22.

He is not to purchase nor hire any Ship or Vessel to be armed and fitted as a Ship of War, or as a Tender to the Feet, unless there be an absolute necessity for his doing so, to replace a Ship or Vessel that may have been lost, and there be not time for him to represent such necessity to the Admiralty and to receive their directions, which must always be done when circumstances will admit of it. But if he shall be ordered to purchase, or if the service shall absolutely require that he should purchase, any Ship or Vessel, to be fitted as a Ship or Vessel of War, he is to inform the Superintendent (if there be one at the Port) of the service for which such Vessel is intended, and is to request him, when a Vessel apparently fit for that service is found, to order the proper Officers to survey and value her; and he is to send two of the most intelligent and best qualified Carpenters, and any other Artificers he may think proper to select, to assist at the survey and valuation of the Vessel, her Masts, Yards, Iron Work, &c., and two of the best qualified Masters, two Boatswains, and two Sailmakers, to assist in surveying and valuing her rigging and sails. If the Vessel be found to be in good condition, and fit for the service on which she is intended to be employed, and can be purchased at a fair and equitable price, he is to draw bills upon the Accountant-General of the Navy for the amount of the valuation, transmitting to him, at the same time, the survey and appraisement, in which he is to see that the rate per ton for the Vessel, and the number, weight, quality, rate, and value of each article be inserted. Where there is no Superintendent, he is to direct the proper Officers of the Yard, with those above mentioned, to survey and value her; but he alone is to be accountable for justifying the necessity of the purchase, and the propriety of the terms, and the bills shall be drawn in his own name, - the Storekeeper being directed not to draw bills in such cases: but the Commander-in-chief is to direct the Storekeeper (if there be one) to hire or purchase Vessels for temporary service, when necessary.

23.

If there should be a necessity for purchasing, to replenish the Stores or Provisions in a Civil Establishment where there is no Superintendent, he is to order the Officer in whose department such want of Stores or Provisions shall occur, to provide the same by purchase; but if there be no such Naval Establishment at the Port, he is himself to take every precaution to ensure that such articles as may be indispensably necessary for the supply of Her Majesty's Ships under his command be obtained good in quality, and at the lowest prices. He is, as from circumstances he shall find most advantageous to Her Majesty's Service, either to make a contract for the supply of the whole quantity required, or to appoint an Agent to purchase them; and he is, in either case, to inform the Secretary of the Admiralty of the orders which he shall have given on the subject.

The bills which may be drawn in payment of such Stores or Provisions will be charged as an imprest conjointly against the Commander-in-chief, and the Officer by whom they are drawn, until regular and satisfactory accounts and vouchers shall be received for the same.

24.

Whenever a Commander-in-chief, or senior Officer, orders a Steam Ship on any service, he is to call the attention of the Officer in command to the instructions enjoining the use of sails, as much as practicable, according to the nature of the service on which the Ship may be employed. The Commander-in-chief is to inspect the log books and track charts, and returns of the expenditure of fuel, in each of the Steam Ships under his orders, and if he shall discover that Steam has been improperly or unnecessarily used in any case, he is to report the same forthwith to the Secretary of the Admiralty.

25.

He is to keep a Journal of the proceedings of the Fleet or Squadron under his command, in which he is to note the heads of all orders and letters received or written by him, - all Detachments made, and the service in which the Ships are sent; and, in general, all such information as may enable the Admiralty to judge of the manner in which the Fleet or Squadron has been employed.

26.

In the absence of the Commander-in-chief of a Fleet or Squadron, the senior Oflicer present is to superintend and conduct the Port duties, or the duties of refitting and replenishing the Ships, and other duties of the naval department.

27.

When he is directed to strike his Flag, or if he obtain permission to go to London, he is to attend the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, to give such information relating to his command as he may think likely to prove beneficial to the public service.

28.

When a Commander-in-chief, or the Commander of any Squadron, shall resign his command, he is to deliver to the Officer who succeeds him the originals, or authenticated copies, of all unexecuted orders, of all general regulations, of all papers he may have received from the several boards for his information and guidance, and of all intelligence he may have obtained of the operations or intentions of an enemy, or of any Foreign Power, except such as the Officer who succeeds him shall be already possessed of, and such as are either directed not to be, or from the nature of them necessarily ought not to he, so communicated; but of all other secret orders, instructions, or signals, he is to deliver the originals to his successor, without allowing copies to he taken of any of them, except, of those which may he necessary for his own use, after he shall have quitted the station.

29.

The Retinue of a Commander-in-chief who may die abroad, or give up his command before he is relieved, shall he disposed of in the following manner: -

The Flag-Lieutenant, the Secretary and his Clerks, and the Coxswain, shall continue their services to the successor to the command, until they shall he regularly relieved; but if such successor be a Flag Officer, they shall be sent to England by the first opportunity, if not disposed of in vacancies. The Domestics shall be sent to England by the first opportunity; but if any of them be fit for the service, and shall choose to enter, they may be placed in any vacancies for which they may be qualified. In the event, also, of a Commander in chief dying at home, the Flag-Lieutenant, the Secretary and his Clerks, and the Coxswain, shall continue their services until the arrival of a successor, or until orders be given, by the Admiralty respecting them.

§ II. - RELATIVE TO CIVIL ESTABLISHMENTS.

1.

He is, in the general transactions of the service, to have authority and control over the Superintendcnts of the Dock-yards, Victualling-yards, Naval Hospitals, or other Naval Civil Establishments; but he is not to interfere with the management of those Establishments where there are Superintendents, unless any particular and sufficient cause should in his opinion render it necessary; and in such case he is to report to the Admiralty the nature of the order given by him, and his reasons for interfering; but should a Superintendent receiving such order consider any public inconvenience likely to arise from his compliance with it, he is to represent it to the Officer, stating his objections; after which, if the order be still persisted in, it is always to he obeyed without further delay or discussion, the Commander-in-chief, or senior Officer, so persisting in the order becoming wholly responsible to the Admiralty for the necessity of the measure; and the Superintendent may, if he deem proper, send to the Admiralty any observations on the subject he may be desirous to submit for consideration thereon.

2.

Where there is no Superintendent in any of Her Majesty's Naval Yards abroad, the Commander-in-chief on the Station is to be guided by the instructions contained in the following Articles of this section, providing for the particular cases therein mentioned; and all the Officers of such Naval Yards, and those also of the Victualling Yards and Naval Hospitals, and others employed in the Naval Civil Establishments, are to obey his orders in all matters relating to the public service.

3.

He is as far as may be in his power, to see that every Officer punctually obeys the orders and instructions he shall have received from the Admiralty; and that he makes regularly, at the appointed periods, and in the prescribed forms, returns of the receipt, expenditure, and remains of the money and stores placed under his charge; and he is himself to acquaint the Secretary of the Admiralty whenever there is a probability that stores or provisions will be wanted for the use of the Squadron.

4.

In all orders which he shall give to the Officers of the several departments, he is, as far as circumstances will admit, to conform to the established rules and general practice of the Navy, and the particular regulations of the department to which his order shall be addressed and he is not to give any directions which may counteract, or interfere with, those which the Officers may have received, except in cases of urgent necessity, when he is to state the same, and the reason for so doing, to the Secretary of the Admiralty.

5.

He is to direct that all stores and provisions be received, from, and all repairs of Ships performed by, the persons appointed for those purposes; and he is not to allow supplies to be purchased, nor repairs to be executed, by any other person, without the most absolute necessity for doing so.

6.

When stores or provisions are required to be provided for the supply of any of Her Majesty's Ships under his command, he is to direct the proper Officer, where there is one, or, if there be none, such other person as he shall think fit, to cause notice of the quantities and quality of the stores, &c., which may be required to be contracted for, to be advertised in the most public manner in order that tenders may be received from all who may be disposed to offer them, and that the contracts may be made with the persons who shall offer the lowest terms, provided they be sufficiently responsible, and give security for the due execution of the same. The time for which any such contract shall be made is to be as short as possible, in order that the Board of Admiralty, should they disapprove of it, may cause it to be the sooner put an end to. The Commander-in-chief is to send to the Secretary of the Admiralty, by the first opportunity, a copy of any such contract, accompanied by a statement of his reasons for having authorized its being entered into. And he is to observe the same directions with respect to any contracts which he may order to be made for the supply of stores or provisions for the replenishment of the store at any Naval Civil Establishment within his command, or for the purpose of any public works at any such establishment.

7.

He is to be very particular in ascertaining the quantity and quality of all stores and provisions which shall have been supplied by contract, as well as the manner in which works performed by contract shall have been executed; he is to direct such Officers as shall be best qualified for such service, frequently to examine the works while in progress; and he is himself to inspect the same as often as circumstances will admit; or otherwise to adopt effectual means for ensuring that the contractors do most strictly comply with the terms of their contract.

8.

When any stores shall he sent from England for Ships employed on any Foreign Station, where there may not be a Naval Civil Establishment, they shall not be permitted to pass into the charge of the Officers who will have ultimately to account for the same, until they shall have been surveyed by a sufficient number of competent Officers to be appointed by the Commander-in-chief, and reported by them to be in every respect good and fit for Her Majesty's Service. If any such stores should prove on such survey to be unfit for Her Majesty's Service, the Commander-in-chief, on being satisfied thereof, is to cause the same to be disposed of, according to his discretion, for the best interests of the public service, reporting immediately to the Secretary of the Admiralty all the circumstances of the case, in order that, if such unfitness or defect shall have existed in the stores when shipped from England, or shall have occurred through default of the person into whose charge they shall have been put for conveyance, the Board of Admiralty may take such measures on the occasion as may be deemed requisite.

9.

He is not, without express directions from the Admiralty, to order any new works to be undertaken in any Dock-yard, Victualling-yard, Hospital, or other place on shore; nor any alterations to be made in Docks or Buildings; nor any repairs in them, except such as shall be absolutely necessary for their preservation: but he is to submit to the Admiralty any alterations or improvements that may be considered to be advantageous, with an estimate for the same; and he is to direct the proper Officers to make a report to the Secretary of the Admiralty of such repairs as may be necessary, with a correct estimate of the expense, and is to certify on the report that it is made with his approbation.

10.

If an Officer in any Civil department shall die, or shall be under the necessity of quitting his station for the recovery of his health, the Commander-in-chief is to appoint a proper person to act in his stead, until the pleasure of the Admiralty shall be known; but he is never to permit a Civil Officer to quit his station until he shall be satisfied that the state of his health does absolutely require it, which is to be certified in writing by the Inspector-General of Hospitals and Fleets, the Deputy Inspector-General of Hospitals and Fleets, and the Surgeon of one of the Ships of the Squadron; or, if there be no Inspector or Deputy Inspector-General, by three Surgeons of the Squadron; nor is he ever to allow such Officer to return to Kngland on leave of absence, without permission from the Admiralty.

If a Superintendent at a Foreign Yard shall die, or shall be obliged to quit his station on account of his health, the Commander-in-chief shall not appoint any person to act as Superintendent in his stead; but the duties of the Civil Establishments that were under his control shall be carried on by the other Officers according to their respective instructions.

11.

He may suspend from his employment any Officer in any department of the Naval Civil service, whose misconduct shall make it necessary for him to do so, and he may appoint another to act in his stead till the pleasure of the Admiralty shall be known; but he is to send to the Secretary of the Admiralty, by the first opportunity, a detailed statement of his reasons for suspending such Officer; and if he be an Officer having the charge of money or stores, he is to order a survey on such money or stores to be held forthwith, and he is to transfer them to the charge of the Officer whom he appoints to act in his stead; instructing him to open a new account, immediately, of the receipts, returns, conversions, and issues of all money or stores, in order to ensure the means of investigating correctly the accounts of the Officer suspended.

12.

He is not, without express directions from the Admiralty, to appoint any person to any new place or office, nor to make any alterations in the arrangements or emoluments of those persons whom he shall find established, he is not to alter the pay or allowances of Artificers or others employed in any department; nor to order any additional number to be employed, except when the urgency of some particular service shall require it, of which he shall inform the Secretary of the Admiralty.

13.

If he finds it indispensably necessary to appoint an acting Storekeeper to any Foreign Yard which may be captured from the enemy, he is to furnish him with a copy of the General Instructions for his government: such appointment will not, however, be confirmed by the Admiralty but upon the most satisfactory proof of its necessity; and the bills drawn by the Storekeeper so appointed are to be charged as an imprest against the Commander-in-chief, for the time being, until the Storekeeper's appointment shall be confirmed, or his accounts shall be passed.

14.

At all Foreign Stations where there is an establishment of the Commissariat, the money that may be required for the Naval Service will be supplied by the Commissariat Officer upon proper requisitions to be made by the Naval Accountant Officer requiring the money. These requisitions are to be presented to the Commander-in-chief (where there is no Superintendent), together with a statement of the balance in the Officer's hands, and of the service for which the money is required, when, if the Commander-in-chief is satisfied of the necessity for procuring it, he is to approve the requisition accordingly; but as it is presumed that money can be procured from the Commissariat chest, as often as it may be required, the Commander-in-chief is not to authorize the drawing of large sums for contingent or general purposes, the amount for which should never exceed the probable expenditure for one month, unless under any particular circumstances to be explained in a letter.

Where there is not a Commissariat Officer, the money required for Naval purposes is to he procured by bills to he drawn on the Accountant-General of the Navy, under the authority of the Commander-in-chief, or Superintendent, if there he one, who is in like manner to satisfy himself of the necessity for drawing before he approves the bills, causing public advertisement to be made for the sum required, and taking care that the most favourable terms for the public be secured.

A letter of advice, containing full particulars of the amount of the balance in hand, of the sum taken up from the Commissary or drawn by bill, the service for which the money was required, and the terms on which bills were negotiated; must be sent by the first proper opportunity, by the Accountant Officer, through the Commander-in-chief, to the Secretary of the Admiralty, for the Accountant-general of the Navy, upon every occasion of the approval of bills or requisitions for money.

15.

At places where there is not a Superintendent, the Commander-in-chief, or, in his absence, the senior Officer present is, immediately on the expiration of each calendar month, to require from the Naval Store-keeper, Agent Victualler, Inspector-General or Deputy Inspector-General of Hospitals, and from any other Cash Accountant Officer at Naval Establishments, an account of his receipts and disbursements of public money, in the precise form of the first part of his Cash Book, showing each item of receipt and expenditure under the date, and in the exact order of its occurrence, accompanied by the requisite vouchers.

The Commander in-chief, or senior Officer, is to cause the cash account to be compared with the vouchers, and the balance remaining in the Accountant Officer's hands to be ascertained by such person or persons as he may depute for this purpose, upon whose certificate he will approve the account, and transmit it, with the vouchers, by the first opportunity, to the Secretary of the Admiralty, marked for the Accountant-General.

The Commander-in-chief, or senior Officer; or the person or persons nominated by him, will inspect from time to time, - particularly when application shall be made for authority to draw money, - the remains of Public Money in the Chest, and ascertain that it corresponds with the balance shown by the daily Cash Book; and is, as often as he may see fit, to require from the Commissariat Officer, where there is one, a statement of the amounts of money advanced by him to Officers of the Naval Service.

At the end of each Quarter, every Accountant Officer is required to render an abstract of the three Monthly Accounts, and to produce, at the same time, to the Commander-in-chief, or senior Officer, or other person deputed for that purpose, his Cash Book, containing copies of the Monthly Accounts; and upon the correctness of the Abstract being ascertained, by comparison with the Cash Book, it is to be approved by the Commander-in-chief or senior Officer, and transmitted by him to the Secretary of the Admiralty, for the Accountant-General, as before directed.

If, at any time, a difference should he discovered between the balance shown by the Account, and the money found in the public chest, the Commander-in-chief, or senior Officer, is to call upon the Accountant Officer for an explanation, which he is to transmit to the Secretary of the Admiralty, with any remarks he may have to make thereon.

16.

In the absence of the Commander-in chief all the control and authority over the Civil Establishments of the Navy hereby vested in him, is to be exercised as fully and effectually by the senior Officer of Her Majesty's Ships present, provided such Officer be not under the rank of Commander.

§ III. - RELATIVE TO COMMAND AT HOME PORTS.

1.

In addition to the foregoing two sections, by which (except the Articles relating particularly to Foreign Stations) he is to be governed in his general duties as Commander-in-chief, he is to observe the following instructions relative to the special duties of the Port at which he has been appointed to command.

2.

He is to be responsible for the speedy and perfect equipment of all Her Majesty's Ships, and for the punctual execution of all orders, and the performance of all duties, at the Port where he commands. He is therefore to consider all Ships, during their continuance in port, as being under his command, except those which, not being in harbour, shall be under the orders of a senior Flag Officer then present. But though the Ships be under his command, for the purpose of his superintending and forwarding their equipment, he is not, on any account, to send any of them to sea (except such as shall be specially placed by the Admiralty under his orders) unless some very urgent necessity, not admitting of his receiving directions from the Admiralty, shall require it.

3.

When the state of a Ship shall be such as to require her going into harbour to be repaired, she shall during her stay there, be under the orders of the Port Admiral, although she belong to the Squadron of a Flag Officer then present, and senior to him; and if the Ship which carries the Flag of such senior Officer be required to go into harbour, he is to shift his Flag to some other Ship, as long as she remains there; and all returns, demands, and applications from every Ship while in harbour, are to be made to the Port Admiral. But the Commander of any Squadron may direct the Captains of Ships under his command, if he shall think it necessary, to report to him also the state of such Ships, and the progress made in repairing or refitting them.

4.

The Captains of all ships not in harbour, under the command of a Flag Officer present, are to make all returns and representations to him, who, if he be junior to the Port Admiral, is to transmit those returns to him; and the Captains of all Ships not put under the command of such Flag Officer, are to make all returns to the Port Admiral.

5.

The Captains of all Ships, not under the command of a Flag Officer present, are to make their returns to the Port Admiral, although they belong to a Fleet commanded by a Flag Officer senior to him; but the senior Captain of the Ships of any Squadron may, if so directed by his Commander-in chief (whether such Commander-in-chief, be senior or junior to the Port Admiral), collect duplicate returns from the Ships of the Squadron, and transmit them to his Commander-in-chief, that he may be informed of the state they are in, and of the probable time of their being fit for service.

6.

If a Flag Officer shall have occasion to send orders to a Ship absent, from the Port where his Flag is flying, he is to enclose them to the Port Admiral where such Ship may be, to be by him delivered to the Officer to whom they are addressed.

7.

A Flag Officer, though senior to the Port Admiral, is not in any way to interfere with his Port duties, nor is he to order any Ship to go into harbour without having first applied to the Port Admiral to know when it may be convenient to receive her.

8.

The Port Admiral is to inform the Secretary of the Admiralty if any Ship puts into Port unnecessarily; or if any Captain makes a report of defects which do not exist, or exaggerates those which do exist.

9.

When a Ship is fitting out, or refitting, he is to see that the Captain and all other Officcrs attend constantly to their duty: and that there is no delay nor neglect in her equipment; and it being of importance that Ships should proceed to their destinations at the time at which it may be reported that they will be ready for sea, - whenever a Ship fitting out has her time of being ready postponed, he is to transmit to the Admiralty a report from the Captain of the cause of the delay, with his own opinion as to the necessity of the same, together with any suggestions he may have to offer for expediting the service.

10.

The directions for mustering the Ships in port, in the Commander-in-chief's foregoing General Instructions, are to be carried into execution monthly at the Home Ports; and a more particular muster and inspection also is to be made in every Ship, and especially in those newly fitted out, a few days before proceeding to sea, at which muster the record book, and all authorities for entries and discharges are to be very carefully examined; and the additional certificate on the same sheet is to be filled up and signed, in addition to the signature to the statement of musters.

The duty of mustering the crews of Ships in harbour (not bearing the Flag of a Flag Officer or the Broad Pendant of a Commodore of the First Class) is to be performed by the Captain of the Commander-in-chief s Flag Ship, or, in his absence, by such other Captain as the Commander-in-chief shall direct; and, at the outer anchorages, the duty in question shall be performed by the senior Captain there present; but the periodical muster of the crew of a Ship bearing the Flag of a Flag Officer or the Broad Pendant of a Commodore of the First Class is to be made by the Captain of such Ship, and the statement thereof is, before being transmitted to the Commander-in-chief, to be submitted to the Flag Officer or Commodore on board, for him to append to it his signature of approval.

If a Squadron not under the orders of the Port Admiral, but under the orders of another Flag Officer, may happen to be present at any home port, the directions for mustering the crews of the Ships belonging to such Squadron are to be given, in. accordance with the foregoing instructions, by the Flag Officer under whose orders they may be placed; and the statement of musters is to be sent to the Port Admiral, if he be senior to the Flag Officer commanding the Squadron.

11.

He is to be careful to inspect, with the strictest attention, the preparation for battle of every Ship newly fitted out at the port at which he commands, a few days before they proceed to sea, as well as those arriving from other ports for their final orders, if they have not been already inspected, and are not under the orders of a Flag Officer present; also such as may arrive for paying off; and he is to forward to the Secretary of the Admiralty, immediately, a full and perfect report upon their state, in the form provided for the purpose. And he is likewise to make a similar inspection on board those placed under his immediate orders; and during the time they may be so employed, he is to inspect their state occasionally, and is to transmit every twelve months a report, as above directed, of his last inspection; taking every opportunity also to impress on the respective Captains and Commanders the importance of their Ships being always in good fighting order, and perfectly prepared to defend themselves against any sudden attack.

12.

He is to look carefully into the state and condition for service in respect of their complements of men, provision, stores, &c., of all hired Vessels not under the control of the Superintendent, and to see that they are not detained in port longer than is absolutely necessary; and he is to communicate to the Secretary of the Admiralty every deficiency or neglect in such Vessels, in order that a suitable mulct may be imposed upon the owners.

13.

He is, on the arrival of any one of Her Majesty's Ships at the port where he commands, to receive from the Captain or commanding Officer of such Ship lists of her defects, in the form given in the Appendix, one copy of which he is to send immediately to the Superintendent of the Dock-yard, who is, upon the authority of the Port Admiral, to cause an immediate survey afloat to be made by the proper Dock-yard Officers; the report of which survey is to be transmitted by the first post for the consideration of the Admiralty, who will give directions (if not already issued) in regard to the Ship proceeding into the harbour, either to have her defects made good, or to be paid off; or if the defects of the Ship are not of so serious a nature as to require that she should go into harbour, no works shall be undertaken which may prevent her from proceeding to another port, if orders should be sent to that effect by return of post.

But in all cases where the defects require immediate attention, the Port Admiral is to act according to his discretion with regard to ordering the Ship to proceed into harbour without delay, or to sending off Artificers to the Ship.

14.

He is to take care that Her Majesty's Ships, whilst in port, do not lay down moorings for their Tenders, Boats, or Boat-stages, either by anchors, ballast, or large stones, without obtaining permission from the Dock-yard Authorities.

15.

He is not to suffer any Ship to remain in port longer than shall be absolutely necessary, after the Captain has received orders to sail; but is to send her away the moment she shall be in a condition to put to sea, if the state of the weather will permit.

16.

Whenever the Superintendent of the Dock-yard shall represent to him, in writing, that an additional number of men is wanted to perform any service, or to execute any work in the Yard, or on board the Ships in Reserve, he is, if the necessary duties of the Ships in commission will admit of it, to direct their Captains to send, under the charge of proper Officers, the number of men required, who are to be employed as the Superintendent shall direct.

17.

He is, during War, to keep a sufficient number of the Ships or Vessels under his command cruizing in proper situations to prevent any Ships of War or other Vessels of the enemy from approaching the port without being discovered; and he is to direct the Officers commanding them to examine very carefully all Vessels going into or approaching the port, and to detain, for his examination, all those whose conduct shall be suspicious, or whose Masters shall not give a satisfactory account of themselves.

18.

He is to ascertain, as early as possible, after the arrival from abroad of any of Her Majesty's Ships to be paid off, that proper pay books have been lodged in the Office of the Superintendent of the Dock-yard for transmission to the Accountant-General of the Navy.

19.

As far as the convenience of the service will admit, the Captains and Officers of the Military Branch, belonging to the Gunnery Establishments, Instruction, Surveying, Troop, and Store Ships, and Guard Ships of the Steam Reserves, are not to be called upon to attend surveys out of their own Ships, or to perform any other of the casual duties of the Port unconnected with the special services on which they are respectively employed.

20.

Whenever a Ship is ordered to be commissioned, or paid-off, he is to lose no time in making the necessary communications to the heads of the several departments at the Port, so that they may be prepared to carry out the service in so far as it relates to their respective offices.

21.

He is to acquaint the Admiralty, by telegraph, of all matters of public interest or importance that may occur or arise from time to time during the day, - especially of the arrival, sailing, or passing of Ships of War, which circumstances are to be reported at the earliest possible moment. He is to cause the direction and force of the wind, the state of the weather, and the height of the barometer, to be telegraphed to the Admiralty, every week-day, at 11 A.M., and on Sunday at 1 P.M. The number of Seamen, Petty Officers, and of other Seamen, short of complement in sea-going Ships, is to be telegraphed every day at 10 A.M.

22.

In addition to the reports and returns which he may be specially directed to make or forward to the Secretary of tho Admiralty, he is to transmit the following:-

i.A general letter enclosing miscellaneous returns; reporting the time of the arrival or sailing of Her Majesty's Ships, from whence arrived, and place of destination, the state of the wind and weather, payment of wages to crews, and all common occurrences, not deemed necessary to be made the subject of separate communicationsDaily, to the time of going to Post.
ii.A report of the state of Her Majesty's Ships.Every Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday.
iii.An acknowledgment of all letters and orders received from the Admiralty; and of all telegraphic messages received, with the replies thereto. (The time of receiving such messages, and of sending the replies, is to be noted in the acknowledgment)Daily, to the time of going to Post.
iv.A return of leave granted to OfficersDaily, to the time of going to Post.
v.A return of the number of Petty Officers, Seamen, and Marines in each Ship, whose period of service has expired, but who are detained in consequence of the special emergencies of the public service. (This return is not required when there are no men so circumstanced.)
NOTE. Separate returns are required for Marines.
To be transmitted so as to reach the Admiralty on the 1st day of each Month.
vi.An abstract of the written circulars, letters, and orders, on general subjects, received during the QuarterOn the last day of each Quarter.
vii.A return of the receipt and issue of Signal BooksOn the 30th June, and 31st December, of each year.
viii.Report of inspection, and of preparation for battleAs soon as possible after the inspection of a Ship.

The account of the Commander-in-chief's postage and other contingent expenses is to be made up to the last day of each Quarter and the broken period to the date of the Commander-in-chief striking his flag, - and the amount thereof will be repaid to the Commander-in-chief, under his own order, by the Paymaster of the Flag Ship. The account itself is to be delivered to the Paymaster, and by him transmitted as a voucher to his cash account.


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