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William Loney RN - Background

Home-Loney-Background-The Royal Navy Browse mid-Victorian RN vessels: A; B; C; D; E - F; G - H; I - L; M; N - P; Q - R; S; T - U; V - Z; ??

TypeSloop (1862: Corvette)   
Launched9 February 1861   
HullWooden Length185 feet
PropulsionScrew Men180
Builders measure950 tons   
Displacement1419 tons   
Fate1875 Last in commission1872
Ships bookADM 135/85   
9 February 1861Launched at Portsmouth Dockyard.
11 December 1861
- 14 December 1863
Commanded (from commissioning at Portsmouth) by Commander Charles Stirling, Channel squadron, then (October 1862) Mediterranean
14 December 1863
- 6 June 1865
Commanded by Commander John Erskine Field Risk, Mediterranean
6 June 1865
- 20 February 1866
Commanded (until paying off at Woolwich) by Commander William Henry Fenwick, Mediterranean
4 April 1867
- 12 March 1872
Commanded (from commissioning at Woolwich until paying off at Sheerness) by Commander William Wilson Somerset Bridges, Pacific
Extracts from the Times newspaper
Fr 13 December 1861The Euryalus and Shannon frigates, at Portsmouth, have as yet no officers named to commission them. Both, vessels, however, are complete in every respect, and can proceed to sea within 12 hours, if necessary. The Vigilant and Pandora screw sloops are held in equal readiness, but, as in the case of the frigates, no one has yet been named to their command. The Chanticleer, 17, screw, is flying the transferred pennant of the Wasp, with her officers .and crew on a week's leave. On their rejoining, she can proceed to sea at a day's notice, if required. The case is very different with the Geyser, 6 paddle, which vessel, on being ordered to the Pacific, has been discovered to have serious defects, and has, in consequence, turned her crew over to one of the hulks in the harbour. She will be taken into the steam basin to-day to undergo the necessary repairs, the extent of which and the time occupied will depend, as a matter of course, upon the extent of defects discovered.
Ma 10 March 1862The Shannon, 35, screw, Capt. J.B. Wainwright; the Emerald, 35, screw, Capt. A. Cumming; the Chanticleer, 17, screw, Commander Stirling; and the Vigilant, 5, screw, Commander Pike, all at anchor at Spithead, are under orders to proceed on a cruise in the Channel, at the close of which they will rendezvous at Queenstown.
Tu 6 May 1862The screw steam sloop Chanticleer, 17, Commander Charles Stirling, left Plymouth Sound, under canvas, on Friday morning, for Portland. The screw steam ship St George, 89, Captain the Hon. F. Egerton, left in the afternoon for the same destination. They were followed by the screw steam frigate Emerald, 51, Capt, A. Cumming. It is reported at Plymouth that these ships will rendezvous at Leith before proceeding into the Baltic.
Tu 3 June 1862PRINCE ALFRED AND THE CHANNEL FLEET.- The division of the Channel Fleet which passed last week in Great Yarmouth Roads consisted of the Revenge, 90, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Smart; the Trafalgar, 90, the Emerald, 51; the Chanticleer, 17; and the Porpoise gunboat. It was joined on Sunday by the St. George, 90, with Prince Alfred on board. The St. George took up a position in a line with the Revenge, the Trafalgar and the Emerald; the Chanticleer (corvette) lies rather further out to sea. The ships yesterday morning presented a very beautiful appearance, their sails hanging lightly in the brails to be dried. The weather was delightful, and the sea was calm and unruffled. Large numbers of visitors put off from the shore for the purpose of going on board the squadron. The Prince is not much seen, and it is understood that he will remain in retirement during his stay in the Roads, which is expected to extend until to-morrow, at least. On Saturday evening the Mayor and several of the leading inhabitants were entertained at dinner by Rear-Admiral Smart on board the St. George; and last evening the gallant Admiral, and the Captains and officers of the various ships composing the squadron, were to attend a ball at the Town-hall. It is uncertain whether Prince Alfred will be present. The shipping in the harbour and the principal establishments in the town made a gay display of flags yesterday in honour of his Royal Highness, and the Yarmouth Battery of Artillery Volunteers fired early in the morning a Royal salute of 21 guns. A cricket match was played yesterday between the officers of the squadron and the Great Yarmouth Club The Fleet "eleven" was made up as follows:- Lieutenant Vidal, St. George; Mr. E.M. Watson, midshipman, St. George; Mr. Milman, midshipman, Emerald; Lieutenant Lord J. Scott, Emerald; Lieutenant Molyneux, Emerald; Lieutenant Key, Revenge; Mr. G.H. Lawson, midshipman, Revenge; Mr. E.W. Goldson, assistant-paymaster, St. George; Sub-lieutenant Stewart, Revenge; Mr. Isaacson, R.M., Revenge; and Lieutenant Gordon, Revenge. The Fleet eleven went in first, and had scored 32 with the loss of two wickets when our report was despatched. The match was played on the South Denes, near the monument to Lord Nelson.
We 4 June 1862PRINCE ALFRED AND THE CHANNEL FLEET.- The Revenge, 90, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Smart; the Trafalgar, 90; the St. George, 90; the Emerald, 51; the Chanticleer, 17; and the Porpoise gunboat still remained yesterday in Great Yarmouth Roads, although the squadron is expected to quit the roadstead some time to-day. Prince Alfred has remained as retired as possible, although the townspeople have evinced every desire to make a lion of him. On Monday it transpired that two officers and a youth had left by train for Norwich, and, although they travelled with second-class tickets, it was supposed that this was done with a view to maintain a strict incognito. A rumour, founded on these facts, that Prince Alfred intended to visit old Norwich, reached that city long before the train conveying the supposed distinguished passenger, and the municipal authorities straightway bestirred themselves to make some suitable demonstration in his honour. A hospitable canon of the Cathedral, presuming that the Prince would visit that venerable edifice, went to the length, of preparing a recherch√© lunch, but the Mayor, more cautions, telegraphed to Yarmouth to ascertain the truth of the reported visit. The reply was that the Royal stranger was still in Yarmouth, and, of course, the Mayor profited by his prudent inquiries. It had come, however, to be generally bruited about in Norwich that the Prince had actually visited the city, and hundreds went down to the Cathedral in the delusive hope of finding him there. All the while the object of this eager watchfulness was at Yarmouth, where he lunched with Mr. Manners Sutton at 3, Kimberley-terrace, afterwards visiting, at Trafalgar-house, Mrs. De Carle, a relative of his tutor, Mr. Onslow. Whenever his Royal Highness appeared in the streets he was followed by an attendant crowd, and on more than one occasion the enthusiasm found vent in irrepressible cheering. Even up to half-past 8 in the evening, when he embarked from the Britannia-pier for the St. George, his Royal Highness had to endure these well-meant attentions. Yesterday morning he remained perfectly retired. The Admiral of the squadron and a numerous party of officers were present at a call at the Town-hall on Monday evening; but the Prince, in consideration of his recent painful bereavement, abstained from joining in the festivities, which were prolonged to about 3 o'clock yesterday morning. About 160 ladies and gentlemen attended the ball, which passed off very agreeably. The cricket match played on the Denes on Monday between 11 officers from the fleet and an eleven from the Yarmouth Club terminated, as indeed it was expected it would, in favour of the visitors, who made 50 runs in their first innings and 86 in their second, while the Yarmouth side scored 56 and 30 respectively. The ships, which have taken in large quantities of fresh provisions, vegetables, and water, were visited yesterday by considerable numbers, but the attendance of strangers would probably have been much larger if cheaper transport facilities had been afforded by the Eastern Counties Railway Company. It may be added with regard to the armament of the ships composing the squadron that it does not correspond with the nominal numerical equipment. Thus the St. George, although, pierced for 90 guns, has only 86 on board; the Revenge, although pierced for 90, only 70; the Trafalgar, although pierced for 90, only 73; and the Emerald, although pierced for 51, only 35. These discrepancies are occasioned by the substitution of Armstrongs for ordinary guns.
Th 12 June 1862Her Majesty's screw steamships Revenge, 73, Capt. Charles Fellowes, flag of Rear-Admiral Robert Smart, K.H., and the Trafalgar, 70, Capt. John B. Dixon, the screw steam frigate Emerald, 35, Capt. Arthur Cumming, and the screw steam sloop Chanticleer, 17, Commander Charles Stirling, from the eastward, arrived in Plymouth Sound yesterday morning.
Fr 13 June 1862The gale which commenced from the southward and westward on Tuesday at Plymouth continued more or less up to yesterday morning, when the wind was blowing strongly from the south-east. All the ships of war in the Sound had taken in their light spars, lowered topgallant masts, and made all snug. It was reported there that the Revenge, Trafalgar, Emerald, Galatea, and Chanticleer were ordered to Milford, where they would be joined by the St. George, in order that Prince Alfred might be enabled to christen the iron-cased ship Prince Consort, 50, to be launched on the 26th inst.
Ma 30 June 1862The Channel fleet hove in sight off Portsmouth on Saturday afternoon, standing in for St. Helen's Roads, under canvass, on their return from Milford Haven. The Warrior, 40, iron frigate, Capt.the Hon, A.A. Cochrane,and the St. George, 86, screw; Capt. The Hon. Francis Egerton, made their way under steam into the anchorage at Spithead, The Elfin, Royal paddle yacht, met the St. George on her passage up to the roadstead, and His Royal Highness Prince Alfred, embarking on board, proceeded at once to Osborne. The Revenge, 89, screw, Capt. Charles Fellowes, bearing the flag of the Commander-in-Chief Rear-Admiral Robert Smart, K.H.; the Trafalgar, 86, screw, Capt. J. B. Dickson; the Emerald, screw frigate, Capt Arthur Cumming; and the Chanticleer, 17, screw, Commander Charles Stirling, anchored in St. Helen's Roads, a strong head wind and lee tide having prevented their reaching Spithead under sail alone. The flagship and Chanticleer are reported to have been on the ground.
Tu 15 July 1862The Channel Fleet have received orders for sea, and, according to arrangements existing yesterday, will sail from Spithead to-day for the Baltic, calling in at the Downs for pilots. The present intentions are for the fleet to proceed in the first instance to Stockholm, and afterwards to Riga, calling at Copenhagen on their return from the Baltic, sometime in the beginning of September. The Channel Fleet now anchored at Spithead comprises the Revenge, 89, screw, Capt, Charles Fellowes, flagship of the Commander-in-Chief, Rear-Admiral of the Red, Robert Smart, K.H.; St. George, 86, screw, Capt. Hon. Francis Egerton; Trafalgar, 86, screw, Capt. J.B. Dickson; Defence, 18, screw, iron frigate, Capt. R. Ashmore Powell, C.B.; Emerald, 40, screw, Capt. A. Cumming; Galatea, 28, screw, Capt. Rochfort Maguire; Chanticleer, 17, screw, Commander Charles Stirling; and Trinculo, 2, screw gunboat, of 60-horse power, tender to the Revenge, flagship. The Warrior, 40, screw iron frigate, Capt. Hon. A.A. Cochrane, in dock at Portsmouth, is detached from the Channel fleet, and consequently will not accompany the ships on their Baltic cruise. The Warrior will be undocked at Portsmouth to-day, and is expected to proceed round to the Mersey, beyond which she has no orders to extend her cruising at present.
We 16 July 1862The Channel Fleet sailed from Spithead yesterday for the Baltic. At 4 p.m. all the ships, with the exception of the Chanticleer, had weighed and stowed their anchors. The Emerald frigate led the way out of the anchorage under her three topsails, jib, spanker, and foretopmast staysail, before a strong westerly breeze, followed by the Revenge, carrying Rear-Admiral Smart's flag, under her three topsails, jib, and foresail. The St. George came next, under three topsails, jib, and foretopmast-staysail, succeeded by the Trafalgar, under the same sail, with the addition of her fore and main courses; the Galatea, with three topsails, jib, and staysail followed, and the Defence, under her double topsails, jib, and staysail, slowly moved up astern. South of the Warner light vessel the Emerald hove to, and the Admiral's ship passing took the lead of the line. The Trafalgar at the same time passed the St. George and took second place, with the St. George third. As soon as the line-of-battle ships had assumed their proper positions, the Emerald's sails were filled and she fell into her place astern of the St. George. The Galatea came next, followed by the Defence, which now let fall her fore and main courses to enable her to keep in her assigned position. As the Admiral's ship reared the Nab light vessel the Chanticleer had got her anchor at Spithead, and making sail brought up the rear of the line, about six miles astern of the leading ship. From the Nab light vessel a course was shaped to clear the Owers light ship, en route for the Downs, and soon after 5 p.m. the whole of the ships were out of sight from Portsmouth.
We 24 September 1862The St. George screw line-of-battle ship, Capt. the Hon. Francis Egerton, with his Royal Highness Prince Alfred on board; and the Chanticleer, 17, screw, Commander C. Stirling, arrived at Spithead yesterday morning from Kiel, as announced in our yesterday's second edition, and await orders at Spithead. The ships now at Spithead, in addition to the St. George and Chanticleer, are the Emerald, screw frigate, Capt. A. Cumming; the Galatea, screw frigate, Capt. R. Maguire; and the Resistance, screw iron frigate, Capt. Chamberlain. The last-named vessel was undocked yesterday at Portsmouth, and anchored at Spithead in readiness for her official trial of speed at the measured mile in Stokes Bay, ordered to take place this morning.
The Revenge, screw line-of-battle-ship, Capt. C. Fellowes (flag of Rear-Admiral Smart), moved her berth from alongside Portsmouth dockyard yesterday to alongside her hulk, to transfer her crew preparatory to going into dock.

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