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William Loney RN - Background

Home-Loney-Background-The Royal Navy Browse mid-Victorian RN vessels: A; B; C; D; E - F; G - H; I - L; M; N - P; Q - R; S; T - U; V - Z; ??

NameGannetExplanation
TypeSloop   
Launched29 December 1857   
HullWooden Length151 feet
PropulsionScrew Men 
Builders measure579 tons   
Displacement890 tons   
Guns11   
Fate1877 Last in commission1868
Class  Class (as screw)Racer
Ships bookADM 135/191   
Career
DateEvent
29 December 1857Launched at Pembroke Dockyard.
31 January 1859
- 11 July 1861
Commanded (from commissioning at Plymouth) by Commander Edward Henry Gage Lambert, Mediterranean
11 July 1861
- 9 January 1863
Commanded (until paying off at Plymouth) by Commander Maurice Horatio Nelson, Mediterranean
3 July 1865
- 5 October 1868
Commanded (from commissioning at Plymouth until paying off at Plymouth) by Commander William Chimmo, West Indies
February 1877Broken up at Devonport.
Extracts from the Times newspaper
DateExtract
We 18 August 1858Sir John Pakington and the other Lords of the Admiralty left the Diadem in Hamoaze at 10 o'clock on Monday morning, and proceeded to the office of the Admiral-Superintendent, Sir Thomas Pasley, in Devonport Dockyard. From 11 to half-past 1 was occupied in mustering the artisans, who were relieved from duty for the remainder of the day. The gunboat Redwing was in attendance to convey their Lordships to the breakwater in Plymouth Sound, but in consequence of the unsettled state of the weather their inspection on Monday was confined entirely to the dockyard. In building slip No. 1 is the screw steam vessel Pantaloon, 10, in frame. No. 2 is vacant. In No. 3 is the Narcissus, 50-gun screw. She was designed for a sailing vessel, and was nearly built in slip No. 2, when it was determined to lengthen and convert her into a steamer. She was therefore, about 12 months since, taken down in pieces, and rebuilt in the present slip, which is larger. In No. 4 is the Java, 20, screw, just begun framing [???; no Royal Navy ship of this name]. In No. 5 slip is the Donegal, 101, screw, seven-eighths built. She will be launched towards the close of September. In dock No. 1 is the Cumberland, 70 guns, docked on the 12th inst., having been ashore, and carried off her false keel in South America. In No. 2 dock is the Liberian schooner Lark, 2, which has been eight years on service on the coast of Africa for survey. As her repairs will cost over 2,000£., and she will then be but an old ship, it is supposed that the Admiralty rather than incur that expense will present the Liberian Government with another vessel. In No. 3 is the sixth-rate sailing ship Creole, 26, forwarding for commission. No. 4 contains the Gannet, 11, screw, preparing for the steam reserve; and No. 5 the second-rate sailing ship Lion, 80, altering to a screw. In the basin is the Topaz, 50, screw, preparing for the steam reserve. Alongside the dockyard are the Aboukir, 90, screw, and the St. Jean d'Acre, 101, screw, both preparing for the steam reserve. The latter will replace the Orion. The Lords of the Admiralty dined in tha evening with Admiral Superintendent Sir John [should be: Thomas] Pasley, after which they patronized a ball at St. George's-hall, Stonehouse, in support of the funds of the Naval and Military Orphan Asylum at Stoke. The official dinner will be given at Bates's Royal Hotel, Plymouth, this (Wednesday) evening, and the levee held in Devonport dockyard to-morrow morning.
We 28 September 1859The following is the distribution of the Mediterranean fleet at Malta:- Screw steamships of the Line.- The Marlborough, 131 (flagship of Vice-Admiral Fanshawe), on her way to Gibraltar, left Malta on the 15th of September; the Hannibal, 91 (flagship of Rear-Admiral Mundy), coast of Sicily; the Conqueror, 101, Gibraltar; the St. Jean d'Acre, 101, coast of Sicily; the Orion, 91, Gibraltar; the Princess Royal, 91, Gibraltar; the Renown, 91, Malta; the Victor Emmanuel, 91, Gibraltar; the Exmouth, 90, Naples; the London, 90, coast of Sicily; the Brunswick, 80, coast of Sicily; the Centurion, 80, Gibraltar; and the Cressy, 80, left Malta on the 5th of September. Steam Frigates.- The Euryalus, 51, Piraeus of Athens; the Liffey, 51, Piraeus of Athens; the Doris, 32, left Malta on the 13th of September; and the Terrible, 21, Naples. Steam Corvettes.- The Racoon, 22, Corfu; the Cadmus, 21, Malta; and the Vulture, 6, Morocco coast. Steam Sloops.- The Gannet, 11, Piraeus of Athens; the Argus, 6, Malta; the Intrepid, 6, Constantinople; the Recruit, 6, Malta; the Scourge, 6, Malta; the Assurance, 4, left Malta on the 31st of August; the Coquette, 4, Marseilles; the Lapwing, 4, Gibraltar; the Osprey, 4, Corfu; the Vigilant, 4, Venice; and the Wanderer, 4, Candia. Steam Gunboats.- The Growler, Gibraltar; and the Quail, Gibraltar. Steam Despatch-vessels.- The Banshee, 2, Malta; and the Caradoc, 2, Malta. Steam-tender.- The Boxer, 2, Malta. Steam Surveying-vessels.- The Medina, 4, Candia ; and the Tartarus, 4, Candia. Receiving-ship.- The Hibernia (flag of Rear-Admiral Codrington), Malta. Depot-ship.- The Africa, Gibraltar. Tugs.- The Hearty, Malta; and the Redpole, 2, Gibraltar. Sailing Gunboats.- The Azof, 2, Malta; and the Kertch, 2, Malta.
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