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William Loney RN - Background

Home-Loney-Background-The Royal Navy Browse mid-Victorian RN vessels: A; B; C; D; E - F; G - H; I - L; M; N - P; Q - R; S; T - U; V - Z; ??

NameSt GeorgeExplanation
Type1st rate TypeTwo-decker
Launched (Sail)27 August 1840 Converted to screw19 March 1859
HullWooden Length216 feet
PropulsionSail Men830
Builders measure2693 tons Builders measure (as screw)2864 tons
Displacement  Displacement (as screw)4579 tons
Guns120 Guns (as screw)89
Fate1883 Last in commission1869
Class  Class (as screw)Caledonia
Ships bookADM 135/454   
Snippets concerning career prior to conversion
DateEvent
27 August 1840Launched as 1st rate sailing ship at Plymouth Dockyard.
31 August 1850
- 8 September 1851
Commanded by Captain Joseph Nias, flagship of Commodore Lord John Hay, guard ship of Ordinary, Devonport
8 September 1851
- 23 May 1853
Commanded (until paying off at Plymouth) by Captain Joseph Nias, flagship of Commodore Michael Seymour, guard ship of Ordinary, Devonport
30 May 1853
- 16 February 1854
Commanded by Captain John Kingcome, flagship of Commodore Michael Seymour, guard ship of Ordinary, Devonport (replaced by Royal William)
16 February 1854
- 5 April 1856
Commanded (until paying off at Plymouth) by Captain Harry Eyres, particular service
Career as unarmoured wooden screw vessel
DateEvent
19 March 1859Undocked as screw at Devonport Dockyard.
6 June 1860
- 9 February 1864
Commanded (from commissioning at Plymouth until paying off at Plymouth) by Captain Francis Egerton, flagship of Rear-Admiral Edmund Lyons, Plymouth, then (May 1861) North America and West Indies, then (May 1862) Channel squadron, then (November 1862) Mediterranean
10 February 1864
- 4 May 1864
Commanded by Captain Sidney Grenfell, Coast Guard, Falmouth (replacing Russell)
5 May 1864
- 1 May 1867
Commanded by Captain Edward Bridges Rice, Coast Guard, Falmouth, then (May 1865) Portland (replacing Frederick William)
1 May 1867Commanded by Captain Mathew Stainton Nolloth, Coast Guard, Portland
27 May 1869
- 30 June 1869
Commanded by Captain Mathew Stainton Nolloth, Coast Guard, Portland (and, May 1869, cruise of the Reserve Fleet) (replace by Achilles)
November 1883Sold to Castle for breaking up at Charlton.
Extracts from the Times newspaper
DateExtract
We 11 July 1860

DEPARTURE OF THE PRINCE OF WALES.

PLYMOUTH, JULY 10.

The screw steamship Hero, 91, Captain George H. Seymour, C.B., with his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, and the screw steam frigate Ariadne, 26, Captain Edward W. Vansittart, weighed anchor in the Sound at 7 o'clock this morning, and shortly after sailed for Quebec. On leaving the port the Prince was saluted by the screw steamship St. George, 91, Captain the Hon. F. Egerton; the screw steam frigate Emerald, 51, Captain Arthur Cuming; by the Artillery in Plymouth Citadel, and by the Cornish Royal Volunteers from a field battery near the ruins of Mount-Edgcumbe-park. About a league and a half south-east of the Eddystone the Hero was joined by Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle's Channel squadron; wind, easterly; very light. It is understood that the squadron, after escorting the Prince part of the way across the Atlantic, will return to Bantry Bay, and, having already visited the capital of Scotland, there is some probability of their going afterwards to Dublin.

Th 13 September 1860The following is a list of ships in commission at Plymouth: - In the Sound, the screw steamship St George, 90, Capt. the Hon. Francis Egerton; the Sans Pareil, 70, Capt Arthur P.R. Wilmot; and the screw steam gunvessel Espoir, 5, Commander Sholto Douglas. In Hamoase, the flagship Impregnable, 104, Capt. Lord F. Kerr; the training ship Royal Adelaide, 104, Capt. K. Ball; the guardship in ordinary Wellington, 72, Capt. Astley C. Key; the Boscawen, 70, Capt. Richard A. Powell; the Implacable, 24, Commander J. W. Dorville; the gunnery training ship Cambridge, Capt. Jerningham;, the brig Nautilus, 6, Lieut. W.B. Grave; the paddlewheel steam tender Avon, 3; and the gunboat Porpoise, tender to the Royal Albert, and the Redwing, tender to the Cambridge.
We 26 September 1860COURT CIRCULAR. Antwerp, Sept. 23.
Her Majesty the Queen and the Prince Consort, accompanied by the Princess Alice, embarked at Gravesend in the Royal yacht Victoria and Albert, at half-past 5 o'clock yesterday.
Her Majesty was received by Viscount Sydney, the Lord-Lieutenant of the county of Kent, and Commodore Superintendent the Hon. James Drummond, and the Mayor and Corporation of Gravesend.
The Royal yacht left the pier at a quarter before 6 o'clock.
The following vessels followed the Royal yacht :- The Osborne, Black Eagle, Vivid, and the Trinity yacht Irene, which had on board the Deputy Master of the Trinity-House.
Her Majesty's ships St. George, Captain the Hon. F. Egerton; Emerald, Captain Cumming; Firebrand, Commander Bruce, together with the Royal yacht Fairy, preceded the Victoria and Albert, and awaited her arrival in the Scheldt.
The Royal Squadron anchored for the night at the Nore, the darkness rendering it unadvisable to proceed further. The vessels were under way at 5 o'clock this morning, and after an unusually fine and tranquil passage arrived off Flushing at half-past 12 o'clock p.m.
The Royal yacht was saluted by the forts at Flushing, and the English men-of-war manned yards and also saluted.
Upon entering the Sheldt the state of the tide rendered it necessary to slacken the speed of the yacht, and she proceeded slowly to ascend the river, and at 6 p.m. anchored off Antwerp.
The weather, which had been remarkably fine, changed at about half-past 4 o'clock, and the rain was very heavy.
As soon as the Royal yacht anchored at Antwerp the British Consul came on board to receive any orders that Her Majesty might have to give.
In attendance upon Her Majesty on board the Victoria and Albert were Lady Churchill, Lady In Waiting; the Hon. Mary Bulteel, Maid of Honour; Lord John Russell, Secretary of State; Major-General the Hon. C. Grey and Colonel Ponsonby, Equerries in Waiting; Colonel the Hon. Sir C. Phipps and Dr. Baly.
Her Majesty will land at half-past 7 o'clock to-morrow morning, and proceed by railway to Frankfort, whew she will pass the night.
Th 27 September 1860THE QUEENS ARRIVAL AT COBURG.
(From the Supplement to the London Gazette of Tuesday, Sept. 25. - Wednesday, Sept. 26.)
Whitehall, Sept. 26.
The Right Hon. Sir George Cornewall Lewis, has received a despatch from the Right Hon. Lord John Russell, dated Sept. 25, 6 P.M.., announcing that the Queen arrived at Coburg at 5 o'clock that afternoon.
(From the Court Circular.)
Antwerp, Sept. 24.
At half-past 7 o'clock this morning His Majesty the King of the Belgians, accompanied by his Royal Highness the Duke of Brabant, her Imperial and Royal Highness the Duchess of Brabant, and his Royal Highness the Count of Flanders, proceeded in His Majesty's barge on board the Victoria and Albert. They were received by Her Majesty the Queen, the Prince Consort, and the Princess Alice. The Ladies and Gentlemen of the suite were in attendance. Shortly afterwards the Royal party entered the barge of the King and went on shore, landing at the Quay, where a Guard of Honour was stationed, and thence were conveyed, together with the attendants upon their Majesties, in the carriages of the King of the Belgians, through Antwerp to the railway station.
The King and the Belgian Royal family accompanied the Queen and Prince to Vervieres.
At Aix la Chapelle the Prince Regent of Prussia received Her Majesty at the station. His Royal Highness, together with his brother, Prince Charles, accompanied Her Majesty as far as Darew. Colonel Count Golz was left by his Royal Highness to attend upon Her Majesty to Mayence.
Lord Howard de Walden, Her Majesty's Minister at Brussels, travelled in Her Majesty's suite from Antwerp to Vervieres, where Lord Bloomfield, Her Majesty's Minister at Berlin, awaited Her Majesty's arrival. Sir Alexander Malet was [in] attendance from Mayence to Frankfort to receive Her Majesty's commands, and the British Consuls at the different towns upon the route paid their respects to Her Majesty.
At Frankfort the Princess of Prussia, with their Royal Highnesses the Grand Duke and Grand Duchess of Baden, received Her Majesty, and afterwards dined in private with Her Majesty, the Prince Consort, and the Princess Alice.
Prince George of Saxony called likewise in the evening to pay his respects to the Queen on behalf of His Majesty the King of Saxony.
The Queen and Prince received at Vervieres, by telegraph, the melancholy and unexpected intelligence of the death, at 7 o'clock this morning, at Gotha, of the Duchess Dowager of Saxe-Coburg Gotha, stepmother to the Prince Consort. Her Royal Highness had for some time been in very precarious health, but there had been no reason to apprehend an additional or immediate cause for alarm.
The Queen and Prince proceed to Coburg to-morrow, and will live in strict retirement.
Ma 14 January 1861Rear-Admiral J.E. Erskine's division of the Channel fleet, consisting of the Edgar, 91, screw, Capt. James Katon; Algiers, 91, screw, Capt. G.D. O'Callaghan; Trafalgar, 90, screw, Capt. E.G. Fanshawe; and the Diadem, 32, screw, Capt. E.G. Fanshawe [should be J.H. Cockburn], left Spithead at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, under steam, and, passing out by the Bembridge lightvessel, proceeded down Channel, their ultimate destination, being stated to be Lisbon.
The Immortalité, 51, screw, Capt G. Hancock, and the Desperate, 7, screw, Commander Ross, remain at Spithead.
The St. George, 90, screw, Capt. the Hon. F. Egerton, left Spithead at 10 a.m. yesterday for Plymouth, where his Royal Highness Prince Alfred will embark prior to the ship sailing for North, America and the West Indies. Prior to the ship leaving Spithead Col. the Hon. H. Byng embarked onboard, and proceeded round to Plymouth in her.
Tu 1 October 1861A number of Armstrong 100 and 30 pounder guns, with their fittings, shot, shell, &c, have been already set aside by the Ordanance authorities at Portsmouth for the service of the North America and West India squadron, and according to present arrangements, the Emerald, 51 screw, capt. A. Cumming, will at once embark the guns and stores apportioned to the Nile, St. George, and Cadmus, and sail with them to Halifax.
We 15 January 1862From letters received from the West Indies, dated Jamaica, December 21, by our Chatham correspondent, several important movements on the part of the various vessels of war are announced. The Mersey, 40, 100-horse power, Capt. H. Caldwell, C.B., arrived at Port Royal, on the 13th of December, from Bermuda, and was shortly expected to leave. The Donegal, 99, 800-horse power, Capt. Osborn, C.B., and the Sanspareil, 70, 400-horse power, Capt. Bowyear, arrived from England on the 16th, with part of the Marine battalion, for Mexico, on board. The Himalaya, 700-horse power, Capt. Seccombe, had arrived from Bermuda, and was to leave for Barbadoes and England on the 22d of December. The Conqueror, 101, 800-horse power, Capt. Sotheby,C.B., had arrived out with her Marines, and was to leave for Bermuda about the 24th of December. Her Majesty's paddlewheel steamer Barracouta, 6, Capt. Malcolm, arrived at Jamaica, from England, on the 15th of December. The Sanspareil passed the Cadmus, 21, Captain Hillyar, C.B., near Antigua, standing to the southward, on the 9th. Of December, last from St. Thomas. Her Majesty's screw steamers St. George, 86, Captain the Hon. F. Egerton, and Cygnet, 5, Commander Thrupp, arrived at Port Royal on the 2lst of December, also a small French screw sloop of war. All were well on board these ships.
We 22 January 1862The Conqueror arrived at Port Royal, Jamaica, on the 13th, one month from England, all well onboard, and will proceed to Bermuda. The Donegal and Sanspareil have not yet arrived. The ships in the harbour are the Mersey, the Himalaya, and the Barracouta. The St. George is expected. The crews are all healthy, the weather being very fine.
Tu 28 January 1862From Nassau (Bahamas) we have advices to the 1st. The Nassau Guardian of that date says :-
"By the arrival to-day of the schooner William H. Bell, Henry Bowe, master, we regret to learn the probable loss of Her Majesty's line-of-battle ship Conqueror, 101 guns, which occurred on Sunday last, she having struck on a sunken rock on the east of Rum Cay, and become embedded five feet on the coral reef. Mr. Miller, an officer of the ill-fated steamer, was despatched in the schooner to Nassau for the purpose of obtaining assistance, and we understand the Bulldog will leave at 5 p.m. to-day for the scene of the disaster. The captain was using every exertion to get the vessel off. The Nimble goes to Bermuda with despatches for the Admiral, and the Steady will remain here for some time. The Conqueror was on her way from Jamaica to Bermuda, and had taken 1,100 marines on board, besides her crew. The marines were transferred to the St. George at Jamaica. We are sorry to hear that there were several cases of yellow fever on board the Challenger when, the Nimble left. The Conqueror is a two-decker screw ship of the line, drawing about 34 feet of water. She is of 800 horse-power, and her speed averaged 10 3/4 knots an hour. She is of 3,224 tons burden, carries 101 guns, and was built in 1855. Her former station was the Mediterranean, and she is one of the vessels recently sent to strengthen the British North American fleet.
We 29 January 1862From Her Majesty's ship Medusa, which left the British Commander-in-Chief on the 5th of January for New York, we learn that the destination of most of the ships on the West India station will be changed in consequence of the pacific tone of the news from Washington. The Mersey, 50, is ordered up to Bermuda; the St. George, 86, carrying His Royal Highness Prince Alfred, is to return home immediately in consequence of the death of the Prince Consort. The Donegal, 100, is to sail for the Gulf of Mexico, to fill the place of the St. George. The Conqueror, 100, will follow in the same direction. The Nile, 90, with the Admiral's flag, was at Bermuda, as well as the Diadem, 32. The Hero, Aboukir, and Emerald, recenly despatched from England, had not yet arrived at Bermuda; in fact, Her Majesty's ship Donegal was the only ship of the Channel fleet which had joined Admiral Milne on the 5th of January.
Tu 6 May 1862The screw steam sloop Chanticleer, 17, Commander Charles Stirling, left Plymouth Sound, under canvas, on Friday morning, for Portland. The screw steam ship St George, 89, Captain the Hon. F. Egerton, left in the afternoon for the same destination. They were followed by the screw steam frigate Emerald, 51, Capt, A. Cumming. It is reported at Plymouth that these ships will rendezvous at Leith before proceeding into the Baltic.
Tu 3 June 1862PRINCE ALFRED AND THE CHANNEL FLEET.- The division of the Channel Fleet which passed last week in Great Yarmouth Roads consisted of the Revenge, 90, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Smart; the Trafalgar, 90, the Emerald, 51; the Chanticleer, 17; and the Porpoise gunboat. It was joined on Sunday by the St. George, 90, with Prince Alfred on board. The St. George took up a position in a line with the Revenge, the Trafalgar and the Emerald; the Chanticleer (corvette) lies rather further out to sea. The ships yesterday morning presented a very beautiful appearance, their sails hanging lightly in the brails to be dried. The weather was delightful, and the sea was calm and unruffled. Large numbers of visitors put off from the shore for the purpose of going on board the squadron. The Prince is not much seen, and it is understood that he will remain in retirement during his stay in the Roads, which is expected to extend until to-morrow, at least. On Saturday evening the Mayor and several of the leading inhabitants were entertained at dinner by Rear-Admiral Smart on board the St. George; and last evening the gallant Admiral, and the Captains and officers of the various ships composing the squadron, were to attend a ball at the Town-hall. It is uncertain whether Prince Alfred will be present. The shipping in the harbour and the principal establishments in the town made a gay display of flags yesterday in honour of his Royal Highness, and the Yarmouth Battery of Artillery Volunteers fired early in the morning a Royal salute of 21 guns. A cricket match was played yesterday between the officers of the squadron and the Great Yarmouth Club The Fleet "eleven" was made up as follows:- Lieutenant Vidal, St. George; Mr. E.M. Watson, midshipman, St. George; Mr. Milman, midshipman, Emerald; Lieutenant Lord J. Scott, Emerald; Lieutenant Molyneux, Emerald; Lieutenant Key, Revenge; Mr. G.H. Lawson, midshipman, Revenge; Mr. E.W. Goldson, assistant-paymaster, St. George; Sub-lieutenant Stewart, Revenge; Mr. Isaacson, R.M., Revenge; and Lieutenant Gordon, Revenge. The Fleet eleven went in first, and had scored 32 with the loss of two wickets when our report was despatched. The match was played on the South Denes, near the monument to Lord Nelson.
We 4 June 1862PRINCE ALFRED AND THE CHANNEL FLEET.- The Revenge, 90, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Smart; the Trafalgar, 90; the St. George, 90; the Emerald, 51; the Chanticleer, 17; and the Porpoise gunboat still remained yesterday in Great Yarmouth Roads, although the squadron is expected to quit the roadstead some time to-day. Prince Alfred has remained as retired as possible, although the townspeople have evinced every desire to make a lion of him. On Monday it transpired that two officers and a youth had left by train for Norwich, and, although they travelled with second-class tickets, it was supposed that this was done with a view to maintain a strict incognito. A rumour, founded on these facts, that Prince Alfred intended to visit old Norwich, reached that city long before the train conveying the supposed distinguished passenger, and the municipal authorities straightway bestirred themselves to make some suitable demonstration in his honour. A hospitable canon of the Cathedral, presuming that the Prince would visit that venerable edifice, went to the length, of preparing a recherch√© lunch, but the Mayor, more cautions, telegraphed to Yarmouth to ascertain the truth of the reported visit. The reply was that the Royal stranger was still in Yarmouth, and, of course, the Mayor profited by his prudent inquiries. It had come, however, to be generally bruited about in Norwich that the Prince had actually visited the city, and hundreds went down to the Cathedral in the delusive hope of finding him there. All the while the object of this eager watchfulness was at Yarmouth, where he lunched with Mr. Manners Sutton at 3, Kimberley-terrace, afterwards visiting, at Trafalgar-house, Mrs. De Carle, a relative of his tutor, Mr. Onslow. Whenever his Royal Highness appeared in the streets he was followed by an attendant crowd, and on more than one occasion the enthusiasm found vent in irrepressible cheering. Even up to half-past 8 in the evening, when he embarked from the Britannia-pier for the St. George, his Royal Highness had to endure these well-meant attentions. Yesterday morning he remained perfectly retired. The Admiral of the squadron and a numerous party of officers were present at a call at the Town-hall on Monday evening; but the Prince, in consideration of his recent painful bereavement, abstained from joining in the festivities, which were prolonged to about 3 o'clock yesterday morning. About 160 ladies and gentlemen attended the ball, which passed off very agreeably. The cricket match played on the Denes on Monday between 11 officers from the fleet and an eleven from the Yarmouth Club terminated, as indeed it was expected it would, in favour of the visitors, who made 50 runs in their first innings and 86 in their second, while the Yarmouth side scored 56 and 30 respectively. The ships, which have taken in large quantities of fresh provisions, vegetables, and water, were visited yesterday by considerable numbers, but the attendance of strangers would probably have been much larger if cheaper transport facilities had been afforded by the Eastern Counties Railway Company. It may be added with regard to the armament of the ships composing the squadron that it does not correspond with the nominal numerical equipment. Thus the St. George, although, pierced for 90 guns, has only 86 on board; the Revenge, although pierced for 90, only 70; the Trafalgar, although pierced for 90, only 73; and the Emerald, although pierced for 51, only 35. These discrepancies are occasioned by the substitution of Armstrongs for ordinary guns.
Ma 30 June 1862The Channel fleet hove in sight off Portsmouth on Saturday afternoon, standing in for St. Helen's Roads, under canvass, on their return from Milford Haven. The Warrior, 40, iron frigate, Capt.the Hon, A.A. Cochrane,and the St. George, 86, screw; Capt. The Hon. Francis Egerton, made their way under steam into the anchorage at Spithead, The Elfin, Royal paddle yacht, met the St. George on her passage up to the roadstead, and His Royal Highness Prince Alfred, embarking on board, proceeded at once to Osborne. The Revenge, 89, screw, Capt. Charles Fellowes, bearing the flag of the Commander-in-Chief Rear-Admiral Robert Smart, K.H.; the Trafalgar, 86, screw, Capt. J. B. Dickson; the Emerald, screw frigate, Capt Arthur Cumming; and the Chanticleer, 17, screw, Commander Charles Stirling, anchored in St. Helen's Roads, a strong head wind and lee tide having prevented their reaching Spithead under sail alone. The flagship and Chanticleer are reported to have been on the ground.
Tu 15 July 1862The Channel Fleet have received orders for sea, and, according to arrangements existing yesterday, will sail from Spithead to-day for the Baltic, calling in at the Downs for pilots. The present intentions are for the fleet to proceed in the first instance to Stockholm, and afterwards to Riga, calling at Copenhagen on their return from the Baltic, sometime in the beginning of September. The Channel Fleet now anchored at Spithead comprises the Revenge, 89, screw, Capt, Charles Fellowes, flagship of the Commander-in-Chief, Rear-Admiral of the Red, Robert Smart, K.H.; St. George, 86, screw, Capt. Hon. Francis Egerton; Trafalgar, 86, screw, Capt. J.B. Dickson; Defence, 18, screw, iron frigate, Capt. R. Ashmore Powell, C.B.; Emerald, 40, screw, Capt. A. Cumming; Galatea, 28, screw, Capt. Rochfort Maguire; Chanticleer, 17, screw, Commander Charles Stirling; and Trinculo, 2, screw gunboat, of 60-horse power, tender to the Revenge, flagship. The Warrior, 40, screw iron frigate, Capt. Hon. A.A. Cochrane, in dock at Portsmouth, is detached from the Channel fleet, and consequently will not accompany the ships on their Baltic cruise. The Warrior will be undocked at Portsmouth to-day, and is expected to proceed round to the Mersey, beyond which she has no orders to extend her cruising at present.
We 16 July 1862The Channel Fleet sailed from Spithead yesterday for the Baltic. At 4 p.m. all the ships, with the exception of the Chanticleer, had weighed and stowed their anchors. The Emerald frigate led the way out of the anchorage under her three topsails, jib, spanker, and foretopmast staysail, before a strong westerly breeze, followed by the Revenge, carrying Rear-Admiral Smart's flag, under her three topsails, jib, and foresail. The St. George came next, under three topsails, jib, and foretopmast-staysail, succeeded by the Trafalgar, under the same sail, with the addition of her fore and main courses; the Galatea, with three topsails, jib, and staysail followed, and the Defence, under her double topsails, jib, and staysail, slowly moved up astern. South of the Warner light vessel the Emerald hove to, and the Admiral's ship passing took the lead of the line. The Trafalgar at the same time passed the St. George and took second place, with the St. George third. As soon as the line-of-battle ships had assumed their proper positions, the Emerald's sails were filled and she fell into her place astern of the St. George. The Galatea came next, followed by the Defence, which now let fall her fore and main courses to enable her to keep in her assigned position. As the Admiral's ship reared the Nab light vessel the Chanticleer had got her anchor at Spithead, and making sail brought up the rear of the line, about six miles astern of the leading ship. From the Nab light vessel a course was shaped to clear the Owers light ship, en route for the Downs, and soon after 5 p.m. the whole of the ships were out of sight from Portsmouth.
We 24 September 1862The St. George screw line-of-battle ship, Capt. the Hon. Francis Egerton, with his Royal Highness Prince Alfred on board; and the Chanticleer, 17, screw, Commander C. Stirling, arrived at Spithead yesterday morning from Kiel, as announced in our yesterday's second edition, and await orders at Spithead. The ships now at Spithead, in addition to the St. George and Chanticleer, are the Emerald, screw frigate, Capt. A. Cumming; the Galatea, screw frigate, Capt. R. Maguire; and the Resistance, screw iron frigate, Capt. Chamberlain. The last-named vessel was undocked yesterday at Portsmouth, and anchored at Spithead in readiness for her official trial of speed at the measured mile in Stokes Bay, ordered to take place this morning.
The Revenge, screw line-of-battle-ship, Capt. C. Fellowes (flag of Rear-Admiral Smart), moved her berth from alongside Portsmouth dockyard yesterday to alongside her hulk, to transfer her crew preparatory to going into dock.
Ma 13 October 1862The St. George, 86, screw, Capt. the Hon. Francis Egerton, went into Portsmouth harbour on Saturday from Spithead for the purpose of being docked, to replace some sheets of copper rubbed off her bottom, and repair damage to her garboard strake, caused by her grounding during her cruise with the Channel fleet in the Baltic. A doubt existing as to the possibility of placing the ship in dock to-day owing to her draught of water, 27 feet, and the tides now taking off, it was determined to lighten her by taking out part of her guns. She was lying lashed alongside the Caesar, a sister vessel now lying in ordinary, and it might have been supposed that the unencumbered decks of the latter were just the places to receive them. The guns, however, were deposited in ordnance lighters, which involved not only a great extra expense, but also a corresponding waste of time. The ship will be placed in dock to-day if it is found possible to do so, but this very doubt is another, and one of the strongest arguments which can be used in favour of the immediate construction of docks at Portsmouth having deep water entrances. The Channel fleet have now been lying at Spithead, with the exception of the Trafalgar, ever since its return from the Baltic, and every ship required docking, as all had been on shore during their Baltic cruise. Portsmouth is not behind other yards in dock accommodation; yet only one dock exists there which will receive first-class ships, and the consequences have been that each ship has had to wait its turn, and even now the repairs of the fleet are not yet completed.
The Trafalgar, 70, screw steamship, 2,900 tons, 500-horse power, has been removed from Sheerness dockyard, where she has undergone thorough repair, to the harbour. She is to have six months' supplies put on board, when she will again join the Channel squadron.
Tu 21 October 1862The Revenge, screw line-of-battle ship, Capt. Charles Fellowes, flagship of the Commander-in-Chief of the Channel fleet, Rear-Admiral of the Red R. Smart, K.H., bent sails in Portsmouth harbour yesterday, on the completion of her repairs and refit, and will rejoin the fleet at Spithead anchorage to-day. The ships now at Spithead comprise the St. George, 86, screw, Capt. Hon. F. Egerton; Emerald, 36, screw, Capt. A. Cumming; Galatea, 26, screw, Capt. R. Maguire; Resistance, 16, screw, iron ram, Capt. Chamberlain; Defence, 16, screw, iron ram, Capt. Augustus Phillimore; Oberon, 3, paddle, Lieut.-Commander Morice; and Virago, 6, paddle, Commander Johnstone.
Th 26 February 1863We have received the following letter from ant Malta correspondent, dated Valetta, Feb. 21:-
"The arrangements made for Prince Alfred going home have been unavoidably altered, I regret to say, owing to the unexpected illness of the young Prince, who has been suffering from a severe attack of cold and fever. The St. George, 84, Capt. the Hon. F. Egerton, having Prince Alfred on board, arrived here from Naples on Thursday last, and the Magicienne, 16, Capt. his Serene Highness the Prince of Leiningen, which, had proceeded from Malta to convey his Royal Highness to Marseilles, returned the same day from Naples. The Duke of Sutherland, accompanied by the Duchess, arrived at Malta on Sunday last from Alexandria, in his steam yacht Undine. They continued their voyage on Tuesday for Sicily and Naples. Her Majesty's despatch boat Psyche, Lieut-Commander Sterne, has arrived at Constantinople, and relieved the Trident, 6, Commander Balfour, which left on the 10th inst for Malta. Her Majesty's ships in Malta harbour are the Marlborough, 131 (bearing the flag of Vice-Admiral Sir W.F. Martin, K.C.B.); the Hibernia, receiving ship (bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral H.J. Codrington, C.B.); the St. George, 84; the Magicienne, 16; the Icarus, 11: the Medina and the Firefly, surveying ships; and the Boxer and Growler, tenders."

Her Majesty's screw steam corvette Racoon, 22, Capt. Victor Count Gleichen, which has recently been refitted at Chatham Dockyard, was taken from Sheerness harbour for her final trial on Monday previously to proceeding to sea. The Racoon carries an armament of two 110 lb. Armstrong guns, one 12 lb. Armstrong and one 12 lb. smooth bore guns for boats, one 12 lb. Armstrong fieldpiece, and one 6 lb. smooth bore gun for practice at short ranges on the upper deck; 16 8-inch smooth bore, and four 40 lb. Armstrong guns on the main deck. The most experienced workmen have been employed in fitting her out, which has been done on the principle most approved in the service, and no expense or labour has been spared to render her, as she undoubtedly is, one of the finest vessels of her class now afloat. The trial was under the superintendence of Capt. T.P. Thompson, of the Sheerness steam reserve, and took place at the measured mile off Maplin Sands, Messrs. W. Rumble, inspector of machinery afloat at Sheerness, and Baker, chief inspector of Chatham Dockyard, were in attendance to note the results with respect to the working of the machinery, and the condition of the ship was also minutely inspected by Messrs. Moore, of Chatham Dockyard, and Martin, assistant-master shipwright at Sheerness. The engines were in charge of Mr. Lawson, chief engineer of the ship. The vessel attained an average speed at full boiler power of 10.1 knots per hour; revolutions of engines, 54 per minute; pressure of steam, 20 lb.; vacuum, 25 1b.; while at half-boiler power the average speed was 7.279 knots; revolutions of engines, 42. The circle was turned with full boiler-power, helm to port, 17 deg., in 5 min. 21 secs.; with half-boiler power, helm to starboard, 23 deg., in 5 min. 59 secs. The engines were stopped when going at full speed in 16 secs, from the time of moving the telegraph; they were started ahead in 35 secs., and astern in 25 secs. from dead stop. The Racoon is fitted with trunk engines, 400-horse power, made by Messrs. Ravenhill, Salkeld, and Co., and common screw with corners cut off; pitch, 26 ft.; diameter, 16 ft.; length of blade, 3 ft. During the trial the draught of water was 18 ft. 2 in. forward and 19 ft. 6 in. aft. There was an entire absence of hot bearings or priming, and the trial was pronounced highly successful both as regards the machinery and the qualities of the vessel. The Racoon left Sheerness harbour on Tuesday for Greenhithe, where she will be stationed until after the arrival of her Royal Highness the Princess Alexandra, after which she will proceed to Portsmouth and remain there till the Royal marriage ceremony is over, when she is expected to leave for a lengthened cruise on the coasts of Norway, Sweden, and Iceland.

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