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William Loney RN - Background

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NameStromboliExplanation
Type1st class sloop   
Launched27 August 1839
HullWooden
PropulsionPaddle
Builders measure970 tons
Displacement1283 tons
Guns6
Fate1866
Class 
Ships bookADM 135/452
Note 
Snippets concerning this vessels career
DateEvent
(January 1840)Out of commission at Portsmouth
18 July 1840
- 2 June 1841
Commanded by Commander Woodford John Williams, Mediterranean (including operations on the coast of Syria in 1840)
11 June 1841
- June 1843
Commanded by Commander William Louis, Mediterranean
(October 1843)Out of commission at Woolwich
13 October 1843
- 12 June 1845
Commanded (from commissioning at Woolwich) by Commander Edward Plunkett, Irish station
13 June 1845
- 10 November 1847
Commanded (until paying off at Woolwich) by Commander Thomas Fisher, particular service
11 November 1847
- 17 September 1850
Commanded (from commissioning at Woolwich until paying off at Portsmouth) by Commander Amelius Wentworth Beauclerk, particular service
11 August 1853
- 11 August 1853
Commanded by Commander William Saltonstall Wiseman, temporarily commissioned to convey guests at the 1853 royal review of the fleet prior to the outbreak of the Rusian ("Crimean") War
23 August 1853Commanded by Commander Robert Hall, Baltic, then Mediterranean and Black Sea during the Russian War
27 February 1856Commanded by Commander George Foster Burgess, Mediterranean
9 December 1861
- 21 December 1861
Commanded (from commissioning at Portsmouth) by Commander William Buller Fullerton Elphinstone, Portsmouth
21 December 1861
- 4 June 1863
Commanded by Commander Arthur Robert Henry, south-east coast of America (until Henry invalided)
4 June 1863
- 8 June 1866
Commanded (until paying off at Portsmouth) by Commander Alexander Philips, south-east coast of America
Extracts from the Times newspaper
DateExtract
Sa 24 January 1852

ADMIRALTY COURT, Friday, Jan. 23.
(Before Dr. Lushington.)
THE STROMBOLI.—COLLISION.

This was a cause of damage promoted by the late schooner Hetty Clifton against Her Majesty's steamer Stromboli, to recover the loss resulting from a collision between them about half-past 12 a.m. on the 1st of May, 1850, in the Irish Channel, 28 miles S.W. of the Calf of Man. The schooner, coal-laden, was proceeding from Chester to Dundalk, and, according to her representation, the wind was blowing from N.E. by N., with a fresh breeze. She was on the starboard tack, close hauled, and, in obedience to the Trinity-house rules, kept her course. The Stromboli, of the burden of 970 tons, was proceeding from Greenock to Portsmouth, having in tow Her Majesty steamer Simoom, of the burden of 2,000 tons, and whose engines were partially disabled. The principal point in dispute between the parties was the state of the night; by the schooner it was said to be fine and clear; by the steamer to be cloudy, with a haze on the sea. It was admitted that the schooner was seen from four to five minutes before the collision, and on the vessels approaching, the steamer, according to her account, hailed the schooner to put her helm down, and it was contended that had she done so the accident would not have occurred. The schooner said she heard the hailing, but supposed it was addressed to the Simoom, and she imputed the accident to the want of a good look out being kept on board the steamer, and to her not giving way in sufficient time.

Dr. Harding and Dr. R. Phillimore were heard for the schooner; the Queen's Advocate and Dr. Phillimore (Admiralty Advocate) for the steamer.

The learned Judge having called the attention of the Elder Brethren by whom he was assisted to the facts alleged by the parties, inquired of them, whether the Stromboli ought not to have stopped or reversed her engines, and whether the Hetty Clifton, on seeing the steamers, which she supposed were racing, ought not to have adopted precautions, notwithstanding the general rule, to avoid the accident.

The Elder Brethren were of opinion that, had a good look out been kept on board the Stromboli, the schooner must have been seen time enough to prevent the collision. It did not appear that the most common precautions were taken by the schooner, either by tacking or backing her headyards, when a collision appeared otherwise inevitable.

The COURT said that the result of that opinion was that both vessels were to blame; the ordinary decree, therefore, must be made,— the damage must be divided between them.

At the rising of the Court the learned judge stated that he should sit in the Prerogative Court for Sir H.J. Fust, commencing on Tuesday next.

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