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William Loney RN - Background

Home-Loney-Background-The Royal Navy Browse mid-Victorian RN vessels: A; B; C; D; E - F; G - H; I - L; M; N - P; Q - R; S; T - U; V - Z; ??

Type2nd rate TypeTwo-decker
Launched1 June 1855 Converted to screwon the stocks
HullWooden Length190 feet
PropulsionScrew Men750
Builders measure2492 tons   
Displacement3632 tons   
Fate1867 Last in commission1860
Ships bookADM 135/67   
1 June 1855Launched at Pembroke Dockyard.
20 December 1855
- 12 July 1856
Commanded by Captain Hastings Reginald Yelverton, in charge of a division of gunboats
12 July 1856
- 22 October 1857
Commanded by Captain Henry Broadhead, Mediterranean
22 October 1857
- 2 March 1860
Commanded (until paying off at Plymouth) by Captain Erasmus Ommanney, West Indies (senior officer at Colón when the filibuster William Walker attempted to invade Nicaragua), then (1858) the Channel, and then (1859) the Mediterranean
Extracts from the Times newspaper
Ma 28 June 1858The Brunswick, 80, screw, Captain Erasmus Ommaney, arrived at Spithead yesterday morning from Plymouth, to join the Channel fleet.
Th 26 August 1858The Orion, 91, screw, Captain Edwin C.T. D'Eyncourt, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Howe Freemantle, Commander-in-Chief of the Channel squadron; the Caesar, 91, screw, Captain Charles Frederick; the Renown, 91, screw, Captain Arthur Forbes; the Brunswick, 80, screw, Captain Erasmus Ommanney; and the Racoon, 21, screw, Captain James A. Paynter, sailed from Spithead yesterday for a short cruise in the Channel, the first movement of the Channel fleet.
We 1 September 1858The Channel squadron, comprising the Orion, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Fremantle, the Brunswick, the Renown, the Caesar, and the Racoon, arrived in Plymouth Sound yesterday (Tuesday) evening.
Ma 6 September 1858

In consequence of the dirty weather from the southward and westward, Admiral Fremantle's squadron, consisting of the Orion, Caesar, Brunswick, Renown, and Racoon, did not sail from Plymouth Sound for Ireland on Saturday Preparations are made for their departure to-day (Monday).
The Diadem, 32, screw frigate, Captain W. Moorsom, C.B., sailed from Spithead yesterday forenoon for Plymouth to join the Channel squadron. She is expected to be away about a month, and on her return is to come into harbour to be fitted with her proper masts. Those she has at present are only jury masts.
The Victor Emmanuel, 91, screw, Captain James Willcox, is expected to sail from Spithead to-morrow to join the Channel squadron.

Ma 4 October 1858Admiral Fremantle's squadron hove in sight, near the Eddystone, at 9 o'clock yesterday (Sunday) morning. Wind, west south west; strong breeze. At 11 o'clock they were approaching Plymouth Sound in two divisions. The squadron includes the Renown, 91, Captain A. Forbes; the Victor Emmanuel, 91, Captain J. Wilcox; the Orion, 91, Captain D'Eyncourt; the Caesar, 90, Captain C. Frederick; the Brunswick, 81, Captain E. Ommanney; the Euryalus, 51, Captain J.W. Tarleton; the Diadem, 32, Captain W. Moorsom; and the Racoon, 22, Captain J.A. Paynter.
Ma 29 November 1858The Channel squadron, consisting of the Royal Albert, Renown, Orion, and Brunswick, weighed anchor on Saturday morning, and steamed out of Bantry Bay for Cork; on obtaining an offing the squadron at noon of the same day let off their steam, and raised their propellers, and proceeded under canvass, the Renown leading the weather line, and followed by the Orion, and the Brunswick leading the lee line, followed by the Royal Albert. The wind during the whole time the squadron was at sea was from south to south-east blowing fresh and occasionally increasing to a gale. At daylight of the 24th the squadron had separated owing to a dense November fog. The vessels arrived at Queenstown in the following order, Brunswick and Renown on the afternoon of the 24th and Royal Albert at 1 p.m. on the 25th. The Orion is outside of the harbour.
Ma 3 January 1859The annual return of the names, number of guns, and tonnage of the whole of the vessels in the navy was published on Saturday, from which it appeals that the British navy at the commencement of the present year, consists of 523 vessels, including screw steamers of every description, exclusive of which there are 167 gunboats. Of the number of vessels composing the navy no less than 176 are in commission, and doing duty in every part of the globe. The vessels in commission are distributed as follow:- 32 line-of-battle ships, frigates, and smaller vessels are attached to the East Indies and China station; 25 on the coast of Africa; 16 in the Mediterranean; 15 on the Pacific and on the Australia station; 15 on the North America and West India station; 7 on the south-east coast of America, and 5 at the Cape of Good Hope. The remaining 61 vessels, are employed on particular service, or attached as guardships to the principal ports in Great Britain and Ireland, including the Channel squadron, which is composed of the following screw steamers:- The Royal Albert, 121, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir C.H. Fremantle, K.C.B.; the Orion, 91, Captain E.C.T. D'Eyncourt; the Renown,. 91, Captain, A. Forbes; the Victor Emmanuel, 91, Captain J. Willcox; the Brunswick, 80, Captain E. Ommanney; and the Racoon, 22, Captain J.A. Paynter.
Fr 29 April 1859THE CHANNEL FLEET.- BEREHAVEN, April 23.-The ships of the Channel fleet that had been staying here for some months left to-day. They comprised the Royal Albert, the Renown, the Brunswick, the St. Jean d'Acre, and the Racoon. The Victor Emanuel and the Orion came in here with them, but early in March they were ordered to Tangier. It is said that these two vessels are to join the Channel fleet again, as also the Algiers and the James Watt, line-of-battle ships, and the Liffey, the Mersey, and the Doris, frigates. The Caesar and the Diadem are also returning from the West Indies to join, and the Euryalus from the Mediterranean. During their stay here the Marines and Naval Brigades were exercised on shore every week, as also in the boats. The Admiral, Sir Charles Freemantle, is most deservedly popular with all classes.- Cork Reporter.
Th 19 May 1859Her Majesty's screw line-of-battle ships Renown, 91 guns, Captain Arthur Forbes; the St. Jean d'Acre, 101, Captain Thomas P. Thompson; the Brunswick, 80, Capt. Erasmus Ommanney, and the screw corvette Racoon, 22, Captain James A. Paynter, arrived at Gibraltar on the 3d inst. from the coast of England on their way to the Mediterranean. These ships of war lately formed put of the Channel fleet, and were escorted to the Bay by the Royal Albert, 120, Rear-Admiral Sir Charles H. Fremantle. The Renown, the St. Jean d'Acre, the Brunswick, and the Racoon, having taken in some fresh supplies, left the Bay between 3 and 4 o'clock on the afternoon of the 4th, under steam for the eastward. The Victor Emmanuel, 91 guns, Captain Willcox, C.B., which has been lying at Gibraltar for some time past, proceeded eastward at 9 a.m. on the 4th. Admiral Fremantle returned to England in the Royal Albert, which left on the afternoon of the 6th.
We 28 September 1859The following is the distribution of the Mediterranean fleet at Malta:- Screw steamships of the Line.- The Marlborough, 131 (flagship of Vice-Admiral Fanshawe), on her way to Gibraltar, left Malta on the 15th of September; the Hannibal, 91 (flagship of Rear-Admiral Mundy), coast of Sicily; the Conqueror, 101, Gibraltar; the St. Jean d'Acre, 101, coast of Sicily; the Orion, 91, Gibraltar; the Princess Royal, 91, Gibraltar; the Renown, 91, Malta; the Victor Emmanuel, 91, Gibraltar; the Exmouth, 90, Naples; the London, 90, coast of Sicily; the Brunswick, 80, coast of Sicily; the Centurion, 80, Gibraltar; and the Cressy, 80, left Malta on the 5th of September. Steam Frigates.- The Euryalus, 51, Piraeus of Athens; the Liffey, 51, Piraeus of Athens; the Doris, 32, left Malta on the 13th of September; and the Terrible, 21, Naples. Steam Corvettes.- The Racoon, 22, Corfu; the Cadmus, 21, Malta; and the Vulture, 6, Morocco coast. Steam Sloops.- The Gannet, 11, Piraeus of Athens; the Argus, 6, Malta; the Intrepid, 6, Constantinople; the Recruit, 6, Malta; the Scourge, 6, Malta; the Assurance, 4, left Malta on the 31st of August; the Coquette, 4, Marseilles; the Lapwing, 4, Gibraltar; the Osprey, 4, Corfu; the Vigilant, 4, Venice; and the Wanderer, 4, Candia. Steam Gunboats.- The Growler, Gibraltar; and the Quail, Gibraltar. Steam Despatch-vessels.- The Banshee, 2, Malta; and the Caradoc, 2, Malta. Steam-tender.- The Boxer, 2, Malta. Steam Surveying-vessels.- The Medina, 4, Candia ; and the Tartarus, 4, Candia. Receiving-ship.- The Hibernia (flag of Rear-Admiral Codrington), Malta. Depot-ship.- The Africa, Gibraltar. Tugs.- The Hearty, Malta; and the Redpole, 2, Gibraltar. Sailing Gunboats.- The Azof, 2, Malta; and the Kertch, 2, Malta.
Th 13 September 1860The following ships and gunboats in the first-class steam reserve could be got ready for the pendant at a short notice:- The Windsor Castle, 100; the Revenge, 91; the Orlando, 60; the Forth, 12; the Seahorse, 12; the Merlin, 6; and the Hyena, the Gleaner, the Nightingale, the Steady, the Spider, the Delight, the Goldfinch, the Charon, and the Lark. The following, in Keyham steam yard, are in a forward state:- The Howe, 121; the Gibraltar, 101; the Brunswick, 80; the Phoebe, 51; the Narcissus, 51; the Jason, 21; and the Desperate, 8.

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