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William Loney RN - Background

Home-Loney-Background-The Royal Navy Browse mid-Victorian RN vessels: A; B; C; D; E - F; G - H; I - L; M; N - P; Q - R; S; T - U; V - Z; ??

Type2nd rate, 2 decker TypeTwo-decker
Launched26 January 1854 Converted to screwon the stocks
HullWooden Length219 feet
PropulsionScrew Men860
Builders measure3340 tons   
Displacement4730 tons   
Fate1870 Last in commission1862
Ships bookADM 135/11   
26 January 1854Launched at Devonport Dockyard.
27 May 1854
- 13 February 1856
Commanded by Captain Charles Talbot, troop transport to the Baltic, and Black Sea during the Russian War
13 February 1856
- 13 September 1856
Commanded (until paying off at Portsmouth) by Commodore Henry John Codrington, in charge of a flotilla of gunboats
7 February 1859
- 1861
Commanded (from commissioning) by Captain George William Douglas O'Callaghan, Channel squadron, then (March 1861), the Mediterranean
- 12 December 1862
Commanded (until paying off at Portsmouth) by Captain Edward Bridges Rice, Mediterranean
26 February 1870Sold to D. Cooper Scott for breaking up.
Extracts from the Times newspaper
We 12 March 1856The following ships and vessels are fitting out and refitting at Portsmouth:- The Victor Emmanuel, screw, 91, will be ready for trial of her machinery at moorings on the 15th instant., and ready for the pendant by the 15th of April. The Rodney, 92, depôtship, will be ready for service on the 29th inst. The Shannon, 51, new screw frigate, will he fitted with her machinery, and ready for trial at moorings on the 15th inst., and ready for commission by about the 31st. The Perseverance steam troopship will be ready for service again by this day or to-morrow. The Vulcan steam troopship will be refitted by the 20th inst. The Centaur paddle-frigate is refitted in the shipwright department, and will be out of the hands of the chief engineer about the 28th inst. The Basilisk paddlewheel sloop will be refitted and ready for sea again by the end of the present month. The Transit steam troopship has repaired what defects she had, and is ready to embark. The Algiers, 91, will be refitted and ready for sea again by about the 25th inst. The Resistance sailing storeship will be refitted by the 22d inst. The Urgent screw troopship will be refitted in her machinery and ready for service by about the middle of next month. The new screw sloop Flying Fish, 6, will be out of hand of the artificers by the end of this week. The Pioneer, 6, will be out of hand by about the 20th inst. The Fury, 6, paddlesloop, has refitted, and is out of the shipwrights' hands.
We 4 November 1857From the activity displayed in preparing for the steam reserve the screw line-of-battle ships Duke of Wellington, Marlborough, and Royal Sovereign three deckers, and the Victor Emanuel, Caesar, Algiers, and Hannibal two-deckers, at Portsmouth, it is supposed that a Channel fleet or squadron of evolution is to be commissioned in the early part of the ensuing year. The Caesar and Hannibal are very forward in their equipments.
Ma 23 November 1857It has been already stated that it is in contemplation to commission a Channel squadron either before or in the spring, about the end of the financial year, and the Renown, 91, just commissioned at Chatham, is doubtless intended as a member. The Algiers, 91, sister ship, is being expedited for the pendant at Portsmouth as much as possible; there will be no difficulty in manning a fleet if commissioned, the guardships being full of continuous and general service men, to the extent at Portsmouth alone of about 2,000 (collectively), above their own complements and more are being added daily by the ships paying off.
We 28 April 1858The Ordnance Department at Portsmouth are issuing munitions of war to the line-of-battle ships Victor Emmanuel, 91, Algiers, 91, and Caesar, 91, in readiness for commission. The Caesar, being fully rigged, is expected to be the first commissioned to form one of the Channel fleet.
Fr 29 April 1859THE CHANNEL FLEET.- BEREHAVEN, April 23.-The ships of the Channel fleet that had been staying here for some months left to-day. They comprised the Royal Albert, the Renown, the Brunswick, the St. Jean d'Acre, and the Racoon. The Victor Emanuel and the Orion came in here with them, but early in March they were ordered to Tangier. It is said that these two vessels are to join the Channel fleet again, as also the Algiers and the James Watt, line-of-battle ships, and the Liffey, the Mersey, and the Doris, frigates. The Caesar and the Diadem are also returning from the West Indies to join, and the Euryalus from the Mediterranean. During their stay here the Marines and Naval Brigades were exercised on shore every week, as also in the boats. The Admiral, Sir Charles Freemantle, is most deservedly popular with all classes.- Cork Reporter.
Th 9 June 1859The Channel fleet now assembled at Portland consists of the following screw steamships;- Exmouth, 91, Capt. J. Stopford; Hero, 91, Capt. G.H. Seymour, C.B.; James Watt, 91, Capt. E. Codd; Algiers, 91, Capt. G.W.D. O'Callaghan; Cressy, 80, Capt. the Hon. G.J.B. Elliot, C.B.; Mersey, 40. Capt. H. Caldwell, C.B.; Blenheim, 60, Capt. F. Scott. A considerable augmentation, of the fleet is shortly expected.
Sa 18 June 1859The new line-of-battle ship Royal Albert, 121, Captain Rice, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, Commander-in-Chief of the Channel fleet, arrived at Portland harbour on Thursday afternoon at half-??? [unreadable] from Plymouth. On arriving off King's Pier, the Hero, Captain G. H. Seymour, C.B., saluted the gallant ??? with the usual number of guns, which was duly replied to. The Royal Albert came in under steam, and took an excellent position inside the other ships of war at anchor in that magnificent harbour. The fleet now comprises the following ships:- Royal Albert, 121; Hero, ???; James Watt, 91; Algiers, 91; Mersey, 40; Emerald, Blenheim, 60; and the gunboats Flying Fish, 6, and ???.
Fr 1 July 1859The screw line-of-battle ship Agamemnon, 91, Capt. Thomas Hope, arrlved at Portland on Tuesday afternoon from Spithead. Her Majesty's vessels now at anchor in that harbour are the Royal Albert, 121; Hero, 91; James Watt, 91; Agamemnon, 91; Algiers, 91; Emerald, 51; Mersey, 40; Curacoa, 31; Blenheim, 60; Pioneer, 6; Flying Fish, 6; and the Biter, 2.
Fr 8 July 1859The screw line-of-battle ships Royal Albert, 121, Capt. E.B. Rice, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle; the James Watt, 91, Capt. E. Codd; the Hero, 91, Capt. G.H. Seymour, C.B.; the Algiers, 91, Capt. G.W.D. O'Callaghan; the Mersey, 40, Capt. H. Caldwell, C.B.; and the screw despatch gunboat Flying Fish, 6, Commander Hope, left Portland harbour on Wednesday morning for a cruise in the Channel. The Agamemnon, 91, Capt. T. Hope; the Emerald, 31, Capt. Arthur Cumming; the Blenheim, 60, Capt. Scott; and the Pioneer, 6, Commander May, are still at anchor.
Ma 18 July 1859The screw line-of-battle ships Royal Albert, 121, bearing the flag of Sir Charles Fremantle; James Watt, 91; Algiers, 91; Hero, 91; the screw-frigate Mersey, 40; and the despatch gunboat Flying Fish, 6, arrived at Portland under steam on Friday morning after a few days cruise in the Channel. The other ships at anchor at Portland are the Agamemnon, 91; Aboukir, 91; Emerald, 51; Blenheim, 60 ; and the gun-boats Pioneer, 6, and Biter, 2.
Tu 26 July 1859His Royal Highness the Prince Consort, accompanied by Prince Alfred and Prince Arthur, arrived in the Royal yacht Victoria and Albert at noon yesterday on a visit of inspection to the extensive defensive and other important works in connexion with the new harbour at Portland. A portion of the Channel fleet, consisting of the Royal Albert, Agamemnon, James Watt, Algiers, and Emerald, which had shortly before left the harbour for Spithead, saluted the Royal party on passing. On the yacht rounding the extremity of the outer breakwater the ships at anchor - Aboukir, Blenheim, Topaze, Melpomene - also saluted. Their Royal Highnesses, on landing, were received by Mr. Coode, engineer-in-chief, and Mr. Leather, contractor for the breakwater, who conducted them over the works now in progress. After the inspection the Royal party returned on board the Victoria and Albert, which immediately left the harbour for Osborne.
Ma 22 August 1859Eight out of the 11 vessels forming that portion of the Channel fleet at Spithead left that anchorage under steam on Saturday. Early in the morning indications were given of their approaching departure; royal yards were crossed, funnels raised, and fires lit. At noon Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Howe Fremantle, K.C.B., embarked on board his barge from the sallyport stairs, and proceeded on board the Royal Albert, which, with the remainder of the squadron, had steam up, and was hove short. It was 3 p.m. before the fleet was fairly under way, the Royal Albert leading as far as the Nab Light, when the Flying Fish, 6, screw, Commander C. W. Hope, was sent ahead of the Royal Albert, and took up her position as look-out vessel to the squadron. Scarcely a ripple was on the water, and a more magnificent sight could not be imagined than the ships presented as they steamed round the east end of the Wight in the order named:- The Flying Fish, screw, 6, Commander C. W. Hope; the Royal Albert, 131, screw, Captain E. B. Rice, bearing the flag (red at the mizen) of Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Howe Fremantle, K.C.B.; the Algiers, 91, screw, Captain G.W.D. O'Callaghan; the James Watt, 91, screw, Captain E. Codd; the Agamemnon, 91, screw, Captain T. Hope; the Hero, 91, screw, Captain G.H. Seymour; the Diadem, 32, screw, Capt. W. Moorsom, C.B.; and the Emerald, 51, screw, Capt. A. Cumming. The Mersey was detained at Spithead on her experimental screw trials, her third attempt at the measured mile on Saturday again proving a failure, owing to the continued priming of her boilers. The ships at present at Spithead comprise the Trafalgar, 91, screw, Capt. E.G. Fanshawe; the Mersey, 40, screw, Capt. H. Caldwell, C.B.; and the Scout, 21, screw, Capt. John Corbett, the above three vessels belonging to the Channel fleet; the Sidon, 22, paddle, Capt. R.B. Crawford, and the Pioneer, 6, screw, Commander Hugh Reilley, both ordered on foreign service, and the Gorgon, 6, paddle, Commander Bedford C. Pim
Th 8 September 1859THE CHANNEL FLEET.- Torbay has been again honoured during the past week with a visit from the Channel fleet. On Wednesday the Melpomene, 51, Capt. Ewart; Diadem, 32, Capt. W. Moorsom, C.B.; and the screw despatch gunboat Flying Fish, 6, Commander Hope, arrived in the bay from the westward. On inquiry it was learnt that a day or two before the fleet encountered a very heavy westerly gale in the chops of the Channel, in which the Diadem sprang her mainyard, and that with the vessels above-named she was detached from the squadron and ordered to rendezvous at Torbay. Early on Friday morning they were rejoined by the remainder of the fleet. The vessels were discerned in the offing standing in for the bay in splendid order. They consisted of the Royal Albert, 121, Capt. E.B. Rice, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, K.C.B.; the James Watt, 91, Capt. E. Codd; the Algiers, 91, Capt. G.W.D. O'Callaghan; the Caesar, 90, Capt. T.H. Mason; the Agamemnon, 91, Capt. T. Hope; the Aboukir, 91, Capt. F. Schomberg; the Nile, 91, Capt. A.P.E. Wilmot; the Hero, 91, Capt. G.W. Seymour, C.B.; the Emerald, 51, Capt. A. Cumming; the Topaz, 51, Capt. the Hon. W.S. Spencer; and the Imperieuse, 50, Capt. John J.B.E. Frere. At noon the whole of the ships had come to an anchor about midbay. It was a noble sight to the spectator ashore to witness these magnificent specimens of naval architecture taking up their respective positions. Thousands of persons were, as on the last occasion, attracted to the quays, and the bay has been every day studded with boats and steamers conveying excursionists around the vessels. By the kindness of the commanders the ships were again, subject to necessary regulations, thrown open to the public, and during the whole of the specified hours an immense number of visitors have availed themselves of the privilege. The Diadem and the Flying Fish got under way on Saturday morning and proceeded to Plymouth, but the rest still remain at anchor.
Ma 12 September 1859The Channel fleet was off Plymouth on Saturday afternoon. At half-past 3 o'clock they were under steam only 3½ miles south of the Mewstone coming from the eastward, and led by the Royal Albert; they then edged in towards the Breakwater, under jibs and spankers only; wind, N. by W. The ships afterwards paid off towards the south, and at 5 o'clock were four or five miles east of the Eddystone, under steam only, apparently going down Channel. The fleet consisted of the flagship, the Royal Albert, 121, Rear. Admiral Sir Charles Freemantle; the Algiers, 91, Capt. George W.D. O'Callaghan; the James Watt, 91, Capt. Edward Codd; Caesar, 90, Capt. Thomas H. Mason; Hero, 91, Capt George H. Seymour; Mersey, 40, Capt. Henry Caldwell, C.B.; Nile, 90, Capt. Arthur P.E. Wilmot, C.B.; Aboukir, 90, Capt. Charles F. Schomberg; Agamemnon, 91, Capt. Thomas Hope; Topaze, 51, Capt. Hon. W.S. Spencer; Emerald, 51, Capt. Arthur Cumming; Flying Fish, 6, Commander Charles W. Hope; and Melpomene, 50, Capt. Charles J.F. Ewart.
Sa 17 September 1859The Channel fleet entered Plymouth Sound yesterday (Friday). It consists of the flagship Royal Albert, 121, Rear-Admiral Sir C. Fremantle; the Hero, 91, Captain Sir G.J. Brooke; the Algiers, 91, Captain O'Callaghan; the Agamemnon, 91, Capt. Wilson [this would seem to be an error, Thomas Hope was captain at this time]; the Caesar, 90, Capt. Mason; the Emerald, 50, Capt. Cumming; the James Watt, 91, Capt. E. Codd; the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Schomberg; and the Topazee, 50, Capt. Spencer. The ships hove in sight about 9 a.m.; the Admiral entered at 11; the last ship at 2 p.m.; the flagship parted her bower cable in the Sound; the Melpomene and the Mersey parted company from the rest of the fleet at sea.
Ma 10 October 1859Yesterday (Sunday) there were in Plymouth Sound ships of war belonging to five different nations, a circumstance said to be unprecedented.- The English ships of the line Aboukir, Algiers, Donegal, Hero, and Nile; frigates Diadem, Emerald, Melpomene, Mersey, and Topaze; corvette Pearl; the Dutch frigate Admiral Koopman, and sloops Vesuvius and Rainier; the Russian sloop Razboynik; the Brazilian corvette Bahiana; and the Turkish line-of-battle ship Shadie. In all 17 pennants. The whole of the ships, with the exception of the Brazilian corvette, have steam power.
Th 13 October 1859The following screw steamships, forming part of the Channel fleet, in Plymouth Sound, were ordered on Tuesday to prepare for sea immediately: viz., the Donegal, 101, Capt. William F. Glanville; the Emerald, 50, Capt. Arthur Cumming; the Melpomene, 50, Capt. Charles J.F. Ewart; the Mersey, 40, Capt. Henry Caldwell, C.B.; the Algiers, 91, Capt, George W.D. O'Callaghan; the Hero, 81, Capt. George H. Seymour; and the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Charles S. Schomberg. The Nile and Melpomene will probably go to the West Indies, and the Hero to Vancouver's Island.
The screw steam corvette Pearl, 21, Capt. Borlase, C.B., left Plymouth on Monday night for China. As she passed through the Sound her crew was cheered most lustily by the crews of the Channel fleet.
Sa 15 October 1859At 8 a.m. on Thursday Rear Admiral Elliott hoisted his flag (blue at the mizen) on board the screw steamship Hero, 90, Capt. Seymour, in Plymouth Sound, and took command of the fleet. His flag was saluted by the Dutch and Brazilian ships of war in the Sound. At noon the Aboukir, Capt. Schomberg, tripped her anchor and was followed in succession by the Hero, 90, Capt. Seymour; Algiers, 91, Capt. G. O'Callaghan; Trafalgar, 91, Capt. Fanshawe; and Donegal, 101, Capt. G. Glanville, under steam, and by the Mersey, 40, Capt. H. Caldwell, C.B,; Melpomene, 60, Capt. Ewart; and Emerald, 51, Capt. A, Cumming, under canvas. The last ship left at 5 p.m. One report states that the squadron will cruise ten days and return to Plymouth, another that they will rendezvous at Queenstown.
Th 20 October 1859The following ships of the Channel fleet arrived in Cork Harbour on Saturday:- Donegal, 101, screw steamer; Aboukir, 90, screw steamer; Hero, 91, screw steamer; Trafalgar, 120; Algiers, 91, screw steamer; Emerald, 51, screw steamer; Melpomene, 50, screw steamer; and Mersey, 40 screw steamer.
Sa 12 November 1859The Algiers, 91, screw, Capt. George D. O'Callaghan, arrived at Spithead from Portland yesterday.
The ships remaining in Portland Harbour are:- the Royal Albert, 131; the Hero, 91; the Aboukir, 91; the Mars, 81; the Blenheim, 61; the Mersey, 40; the Emerald, 51; and the Melpomene, 51.
The screw steamshlp Trafalgar, 91, from Portland, arrived in Plymouth Sound yesterday morning.
We 7 December 1859The screw line-of-battle ship Algiers, 91, rejoined the Channel Fleet at Portland on Sunday. The vessels now at anchor there are the Royal Albert, 131 (flag ship); Hero, 91; Aboukir, 91; Algiers, 91; Trafalgar, 91; Mars, 80; Mersey, 40; Diadem, 32; Blenheim, 60; Donegal, 101; Partridge, 6; and the Biter, 2.
Th 19 January 1860The screw line-of-battle ships in Portland harbour are the Edgar, 91, flagship of Rear-Admiral Erskine, second in command of the Channel fleet; Donegal, 101; Hero, 91; Algiers, 91; Trafalgar, 91; Aboukir, 91; and the Mars, 80. The screw frigate Diadem, 32; the screw corvette Mutine, 18; and the gunboats Flying Fish, 6; and the Partridge, 2. The paddlewheel steam frigate Prometheus, 6, and the Coastguard ship Blenheim are also at anchor. The Royal Albert, 121, is daily expected from Plymouth.
Th 23 February 1860The screw steam frigate Diadem, 32, Capt. James H. Cockburn, arrived at Portland on Tuesday from Portsmouth. A portion of the Channel fleet is expected to leave that harbour in a few days for the Tagus. The vessels now in port are the Royal Albert, 121; Edgar, 91; Queen, 91; Algiers, 91: Donegal, 101; Hero, 91; Trafalgar, 91; Melpomene, 51; Mersey, 40; Diadem, 32; Blenheim, 60; Mutine, 17; Greyhound, 17; Biter, 2; and the Partridge, 2.
Fr 24 February 1860We learn by electric telegraph that the Channel fleet, consisting of the Royal Albert, Edgar, Donegal, Algiers, Trafalgar, Queen, Mersey, Melpomene, and Diadem, left Portland at noon yesterday, under sail, for Lisbon.
Fr 2 March 1860A letter dated Torbay, Tuesday, received at Plymouth, from one of the officers of the Channel squadron, says that off the Lizard the ships were taken all aback, and could not again form a line. The Edgar, Queen, and Donegal remained out. Besides the casualties to the Queen, Diadem, Algiers, and Mersey, already reported in The Times, the letter states that the Aboukir lost her cross-jack yard and starboard quarter-boats, the Royal Albert pitched her jib-boom under at times, and the Trafalgar lost her jib-boom; she will probably call at Plymouth before proceeding to the Tagus.
We 4 April 1860A portion of the Channel Fleet, consisting of the screw steamships Royal Albert, 121, Capt. Henry J. Lacon, bearing the flag of Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, K.C.B.; the Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadhead; the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Charles F. Schomberg; and the screw steam-frigate Melpomene, 51, Capt. Charles J.F. Ewart, hove in sight at Plymouth about 6 o'clock yesterday (Tuesday) morning, with the wind from the westward, a smart breeze. They came in from sea under their three topsails, and on reaching the west end of the breakwater took in all canvas, and proceeded under steam to the anchorage ground, the flagship taking her position well to the westward. At 8 o'clock the flag of Port Admiral Sir Barrington Reynolds, K.C.B., was honoured by a salute, which was acknowledged by the Impregnable, 104, Capt. Stewart, in Hamoaze. This portion of the Channel fleet left Lisbon on Friday, March the 23d, in company with the screw steamships Edgar, 91, Capt. James E. Katon; Algiers, 91, Capt. George W.D. O'Callaghan; Queen, 86, Capt. Charles F. Hillyar; Mars, 80, Capt. James N. Strange; and the screw steam-frigate Mersey, 40, Capt. Henry Caldwell, C.B. The Edgar carried away her main topsailyard on Sunday morning, when crossing the Bay of Biscay. The Edgar and Mersey have lost a man each overboard. On Monday night, off the Lizard, the Edgar, Algiers, Queen, Mars, and Mersey parted company, and proceeded up Channel for Portsmouth. Very fine weather was experienced at first, but within the last four days strong gales from west-north-west have prevailed, with extraordinary heavy seas. All the ships are reported leaky; the Royal Albert will require a thorough caulking. Two Dutch ships of war were in the Tagus.
Th 5 April 1860The Second Division of the Channel fleet, comprising the Edgar, 91, screw, Capt. James E. Katon, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral of the Blue John E. Erskine; the Queen, 86, screw, Capt. C.F. Hillyar; the Algiers, 91, screw, Capt. G.W.D. O'Callaghan; the Mars, 80, screw, Capt. J.N. Strange; and the Mersey, 40, screw, Capt. H. Caldwell, C.B., steamed into Spithead from the Channel yesterday morning by the eastern entrance in the order named. The Edgar having anchored, each succeeding ship steamed to the westward of the flagship, and, rounding to, proceeded to their respective positions. The Queen took up the eastern berth of the line, a-head of the Edgar. To the westward of the Edgar the Algiers anchored, and the Mars took up the western berth. The four liners are thus moored in a line from south-east to north-west. The Mersey frigate brought up in deeper water on the outside of the line. Soon after the ships came in sight the customary salutes were exchanged between the Edgar, flagship of Rear-Admiral Erskine, and the Victory, flagship of the Commander-in-Chief, Vice-Admiral Bruce. The Sprightly and Pigmy steam tenders were despatched from the harbour to Spithead on the fleet's arrival.

Sails were unbent on Tuesday on board that portion of the Channel squadron which arrived in Plymouth Sound the same day from Lisbon, and measures are in progress for their immediate refitment. Those ships previously in the Sound sent up topgallantmasts and yards, and loosed sails to dry. The Conqueror, 101, Capt. Sotheby, steamed into Hamoaze and brought up off Keyham; she was appointed to go into dock yesterday (Wednesday).

We 11 April 1860The portion of the Channel fleet anchored at Spithead, under the command of Rear-Admiral John E. Erskine, and consisting of the Edgar, the Algiers, the Queen, the Mars, and the Mersey, has been inspected by the officials of the steam and shipwright departments, and their report of defects of the different ships, and the repairs recommended to be carried out, has been forwarded to the Admiralty. The whole of the five vessels, as we before stated, are in need of repairs to both hull and machinery. The Mersey's required repairs in the last-named department are likely to prove of a very extensive character, and necessarily involve a large outlay before she can be again pronounced fit for foreign service. The Queen's repairs have been taken in hand by the Steam Factory Department. The Algiers, it is expected, will proceed to Keyham, where she will be placed in dock to repair the defects in her stern, &c. It is rumoured that the Duke of Wellington, 131, screw, in the first-class steam reserve in Portsmouth harbour, will be commissioned to receive the flag of the Admiral commanding the Channel Fleet, the Royal Albert's defects requiring remedy. The Duke may be pronounced fit for 18 months, or, perhaps, two years' service, if worked carefully and no accident occurring; but at the end of that time she would require new boilers and very extensive repairs to both hull and engines. As she is not in a sufficiently healthy condition of hull, boilers, and engines, to be sent on a foreign station for a three years' cruise, it is very probable that the rumour concerning her may be verified, and that she may carry Admiral Fremantle's flag in the Channel Fleet.
Fr 11 May 1860The Algiers, 91, screw, Capt. George D. O'Callaghan, will go out of Portsmouth Harbour to Spithead to-morrow morning, to rejoin the first division of the Channel fleet at Spithead, on the completion of her repairs and refit.
Ma 14 May 1860The Algiers, 91, screw, Capt. G.D. O'Callaghan, steamed ont of Portsmouth harbour on Saturday, and anchored in her old position with the port division of the Channel fleet at Spithead.
Fr 25 May 1860The Channel fleet, consisting of the Conqueror, 101; the Donegal, 101; the Algiers, 91, the Aboukir, 91; the Trafalgar, 91; the Centurion, 80; the Mars, 80; and the Diadem, 32, left Portland harbour on Wednesday afternoon for a cruise in the Channel. The Blenheim, 60, is the only ship of war now at Portland.
Ma 25 June 1860The Channel squadron, after an anchorage of 15 days in St. Margaret's Hope, Firth of Forth, left its moorings on Saturday afternoon, and under canvass, with auxiliary steam power, proceeded down the Firth and stood out to sea. The squadron, in passing the narrow straits at Queensferry, proceeded in single line, the leading ships being the Royal Albert, 121, flagship of Vice-Admiral Sir C. Fremantle, the Mersey, 40-gun frigate, the Edgar, 91, flagship of Rear-Admiral Erskine, and the Donegal, 101, followed by seven other ships of the line and the Diadem frigate. The Greyhound corvette, 17, accompanied the Royal Albert as a tender. On passing Inchkeith, and getting into the outer bay of the Firth, the fleet formed in two lines, and stood out south-west in the direction of St. Abb's Head; the Royal Albert, the Donegal, the Aboukir, the Conqueror, and the Centurion, with the Greyhound forming the south line, and the Edgar, the Trafalgar, the Algiers, the Mars, the Diadem, and the Mersey, the north line. A number of steamers convoyed the fleet down the Firth, The public enthusiasm excited by the visit o£ the Channel squadron in the Forth can scarcely fall to give a stimulus to the service in the south-east of Scotland, where for many years a fleet of war-ships had not been seen; and great disappointment is felt that the fleet has not been able to make the tour of the north of Scotland and Ireland, as was anticipated. It was expected that the squadron would reach Yarmouth-roads yesterday afternoon.
Ma 2 July 1860On Saturday the Channel fleet arrived In Yarmouth Roads. The squadron, which has been engaged in target practice in the North Sea during the past week, consists of the Royal Albert, 120; Conqueror, 101; Donegal, 101; Algiers, 91; Edgar, 91; Aboukir, 91; Trafalgar, 91; Centurion, 80; Mars, 80; Mersey, 40; Diadem, 32; Ariadne, 26; and Flying Fish, 6. The fleet is not expected to remain in Yarmouth Roads more than three or four days, as it is to take part in a naval review before the departure of his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales for Canada.
Tu 10 July 1860



Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle's Channel squadron, consisting of the flagship Royal Albert, 121, Captain Henry J. Lacon; the Donegal, 101, Captain Henry Broadhead; the Aboukir, 90, Captain Douglas Curry; the Greyhound, 17, Commander Francis W. Sullivan; the Conqueror, 101, Captain Edward S. Sotheby, C.B.; the Trafalgar, 90, Captain Edward G. Fanshawe ; the Centurion, 80, Captain Henry G. Rogers, C.B.; the Edgar, 91, Captain James E. Katon; the Algiers, 91, Captain George W.D. O'Callaghan; the Mersey, 40, Captain Henry Caldwell, C.B.; and the Diadem, 32, Captain James H. Cockburn, under canvas only, with a smart breeze a little to the southward of east, hove in sight from Mount Wise at half-past 8 o'clock this morning in two lines. They then formed one line, and stood in for the port. At half-past 10 o'clock the ships wore in succession, and went away to the westward. Shortly after they came in sight more to the southward. Their funnels are up ready for use. The only ship likely to enter the Sound is the Diadem, which is said to be short of fuel. The Earl of Mount-Edgcumbe, in his steam yacht, near the Royal William Victualling-yard, is waiting the approach of the Prince of Wales. The Hero continues inside the Breakwater ready for sea, and arrangements are made for the expected departure of his Royal Highness to-morrow (Tuesday) morning. Her escort, the Ariadne, will probably take the Osborne in tow. The Flying Fish has gone on to Newfoundland.



Sir Charles Fremantle's squadron, which arrived off the port this morning, formed two lines, ranging about north and south, in the afternoon to receive the Royal yacht, which hove in sight at 7 o'clock, and was saluted by the Impregnable and other ships in Hamoaze. On rounding the west-end of the Breakwater the yardarms of the Hero, St. George, Emerald, and Ariadne, in the Sound, were manned, and the three last-named and the Plymouth Citadel saluted. At half-past 8, when the Prince left the yacht to join the Hero, the Emerald and the Citadel repeated the compliment. The weather is extremely fine, and thousands of the inhabitants were assembled on the heights.

Tu 11 September 1860


The fleet, having all got under way by about 8 a.m., stood out to sea from Milford Haven, and, having made an offing of about seven miles, the Osborne, which had previously joined, with the Lords of the Admiralty on board, made the signal for the fleet to form a double line. They accordingly broke into two divisions; the starboard one, consisting of the Royal Albert, 121; the Donegal, 101; the Conqueror, 101; the Mars, 80, and the Trafalgar, 91, was led by Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, K.C.B., in the Royal Albert. The port division, under Rear-Admiral Erskine, in the Edgar, 91, which was leading, comprised also the Algiers, 91; the Aboukir, 91; the Centurion, 80; the Mersey, 40; and the Diadem, 32. This manoeuvre having been executed with great precision, the Osborne signalled for the fleet to make sail under easy canvass, followed by an order from the Admiral to bank up the fires. Having stood on thus for some time, the two divisions tacked in succession to the starboard, after which the order was given to form a single line of battle. This was effected by the starboard division standing on its course, and the port one tacking until they came into line, when they followed in the wake of their predecessors, an interval of two cables' length separating each ship. The concluding and most exciting manoeuvre of the day was then made by the whole getting orders to make all sail that could be done with safety, and running before the wind. Studdingsail booms were then run out, and every inch of canvass both alow and aloft that would draw was set. The order was then given to make for the nearest port, on which the fleet bore up for Milford Haven. The Osborne then steamed up to the Admiral's ship, and Rear-Admiral Pelham, C.B., hailed Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, K.C.B., and expressed, on the part of his Grace the Duke of Somerset and the rest of the Lords, the extreme satisfaction they all felt, not only in the appearance of the fleet, but also in the admirable precision with which all the manoeuvres had that day been performed, and we believe Capt. Ramsay, C.B., the superintendent of Pembroke Dockyard, was commissioned to convey the above opinion in writing to the Admiral of the fleet. The Osborne then parted company, - the Royal Albert giving the Lords of the Admiralty a salute of 19 guns, which the Osborne acknowledged by dipping her ensign, after which she stood to the southward, it being their Lordships' intention to inspect some important works in progress at the Scilly Isles, and afterwards proceed to Devonport to inspect the dockyard at that place. Nothing could be more favourable than the weather; it was slightly hazy up to 8 o'clock a.m., when it cleared up, and a fine fresh breeze came from the north-east, which lasted up to 3 o'clock p.m., when it died away. The whole of the signalling was done by bunting, and not by Ward's new system, as was generally supposed that it would be, and the brilliant flags had a very pretty effect as rapidly repeated by every third ship. As the fleet entered the harbour the Admiral made the signal for all the ships to take up their old berths, and by 6 o'clock p.m., all were in their original positions.

The Lords of the Admiralty previous to leaving Pembroke-dock granted the employés the usual half-holyday for Saturday.

Th 13 September 1860Pursuant to orders received on Sunday last, the Channel fleet, consisting of the Royal Albert, 121, Capt. H.J. Lacon, flagship of Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, K.C.B., commanding the Fleet; the Conqueror, 101, Capt. Edward S. Sotheby, C.B.; the Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadhead; the Edgar, 91, Capt. James E. Katon, flagship of Rear-Admiral John E. Erskine; the Mars, 80, Capt. James F. Strange; the Trafalgar, 91, Capt. Edward G. Fanshawe; the Algiers, 91, Capt. George W.D, O'Callaghan; the Centurion, 80, Capt. Henry D. Rogers, C.B.; the Aboukir, 91, Capt. Douglas Curry; the Mersey, 40, Capt. Henry Caldwell, C.B.; and the Diadem, 32, Capt. James H. Cockburn, got steam up by daybreak on Tuesday last, and sailed from Milford Haven at about 10 o'clock a.m. They are bound for a cruise of three weeks or a month, and it is supposed will go round the Western Islands, after which they are to rendezvous at Torbay, previous to going into winter quarters. Mr Ward is on board the Admiral's ship with his new system of ocean telegraphs, which are to be thoroughly tried during the cruise. The fleet has been in Milford Haven for more than three weeks, and the conduct of the men has been most exemplary. The civil authorities have not had to interfere except in one or two exceptional cases of drunkenness, together with a few cases of the not very heinous crime of overstaying leave. Rumour has it that three or four vessels of the fleet are to winter at Milford. A more secure berth could not be found in any case.
Th 4 October 1860The second division of the Channel fleet, under the command of Rear-Admiral J.R. Erskine, arrived at Spithead yesterday morning from the westward, under steam and fore and aft canvas. The ships comprise the Edgar, 91, screw (flag), Captain J.E. Katon; Trafalgar, 91, screw, Capt E.G. Fanshawe; Algiers, 91, screw, Capt. George D. O'Callaghan; Mersey, 40, screw, Capt. H. Caldwell, C.B. and the Diadem, 32, screw, Capt J.H. Cockburn.
Sa 20 October 1860Vice-Admiral of the Blue Sir Charles Howe Fremantle, K.C.B., in command of the Channel squadron, is expected to return with the fleet to Portland to-morrow (Wednesday). The following is a list of the ships, guns, horse-power, and tons' burden, together with the names of the officers and number of men composing the fleet: - Vice-Admiral Sir C. H. Fremantle, K.C.B., Commander; Rear-Admiral J.B. Erskine, Second in Command; Rear-Admiral R.F. Stopford, Captain of the Fleet:-
ShipsGunsComplementHorse powerTonsCommanders
Royal Albert1211,0505003,726Capt H.J. Lacon
Donegal1019308003,245" H. Broadhead
Conqueror1009308003,265" E.S. Sotheby, C.B.
Edgar918606003,094" J.E. Katon
Trafalgar908605002,900" E.G. Fanshawe
Algiers918506003,340" G.W.D. O'Callaghan
Aboukir908304003,091" D. Curry
Centurion807504003,590" H.D. Rogers, C.B.
Mersey405941,0003,733" H. Caldwell, C.B.
Diadem324758002,475" J.H. Cockburn
Partridge2 60233Tender to Royal Albert.
Ma 31 December 1860THE POPULARITY OF THE NAVY.- A correspondent informs us that the eastern division of the Channel fleet shows the following list of desertions:- Trafalgar, 169; Edgar, 146; Algiers, 89; Diadem, 110;- a severe reckoning, which shows that there are causes for desertion more tempting than the inducements to remain, or that the deserters were irrational blackguards, who to their offence superadded ignorance of their own interests.- Army and Navy Gazette.
We 9 January 1861The Edgar, 91, screw, Capt. James Katon, flagship of Rear-Admiral J.E. Erskine, left Portsmouth harbour yesterday morning, and took up a berth to the eastward of the ships at Spithead. The ships now anchored at Spithead, in addition to the Edgar, comprise the Algiers, 91, screw, Capt. G.D. O'Callaghan; the Trafalgar, 91, screw, Capt. Fanshawe; the Immortalité, 51, screw, Capt. G. Hancock; the Diadem, 32, screw, Capt. G. Cockburn; the Cossack, 20, screw, Capt. R. Moorman; the Desperate, 7, screw, Commander Ross; and the Triton, 3, paddle, Lieut-Commander R. Burton; the whole representing a force of 477 guns, and 4,410-horse power, nominal.
The screw steamship Centurion, 80, Capt. H.D. Rogers, C.B., which left Lisbon on the 30th of December, arrived in Plymouth Sound yesterday morning. She started from the Tagus under steam, with a southerly wind, which continued until the 4th inst., when she was taken aback with east and south-east winds. On Sunday it changed to southwest, and so continued until 8.30 a.m. on Monday, when baffling winds were experienced, and at 2 30 p.m. steam was got up and continued until she reached the Sound. The weather was moderate and fine all the passage home. The Centurion brings only 10 invalids, who were taken from Lisbon hospital, where they were left by the Channel Fleet; she was ordered to go up Hamoaze yesterday afternoon to make good defects; her crew will be paid down and granted leave of absence. The screw steamship St. Jean d'Acre, 101, Capt. the Hon. C. Elliott, which arrived December 29, was left in the Tagus. The Centurion spoke January 4, at 4 p.m. the ship Phoenix, homeward bound.
Ma 14 January 1861Rear-Admiral J.E. Erskine's division of the Channel fleet, consisting of the Edgar, 91, screw, Capt. James Katon; Algiers, 91, screw, Capt. G.D. O'Callaghan; Trafalgar, 90, screw, Capt. E.G. Fanshawe; and the Diadem, 32, screw, Capt. E.G. Fanshawe [should be J.H. Cockburn], left Spithead at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, under steam, and, passing out by the Bembridge lightvessel, proceeded down Channel, their ultimate destination, being stated to be Lisbon.
The Immortalité, 51, screw, Capt G. Hancock, and the Desperate, 7, screw, Commander Ross, remain at Spithead.
The St. George, 90, screw, Capt. the Hon. F. Egerton, left Spithead at 10 a.m. yesterday for Plymouth, where his Royal Highness Prince Alfred will embark prior to the ship sailing for North, America and the West Indies. Prior to the ship leaving Spithead Col. the Hon. H. Byng embarked onboard, and proceeded round to Plymouth in her.

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