* Home * Loney home * Life & career * Documents * Album * Ships * Portrait * Uniform * Background * * Search this site * 
William Loney RN - Background

Home-Loney-Background-The Royal Navy Browse mid-Victorian RN vessels: A; B; C; D; E - F; G - H; I - L; M; N - P; Q - R; S; T - U; V - Z; ??

NameAboukirExplanation
Type2nd rate, 2 decker TypeTwo-decker
Launched (Sail)4 April 1848 Converted to screw1 January 1858
HullWooden Length204 feet
PropulsionSail Men830
Builders measure3080 tons Builders measure (as screw)3080 tons
Displacement  Displacement (as screw)4382 tons
Guns90 Guns (as screw)91
Fate1877 Last in commission1862
Class  Class (as screw)Albion
Ships bookADM 135/1   
Snippets concerning career prior to conversion
DateEvent
4 April 1848Launched as 2nd rate sailing ship at Devonport Dockyard.
Career as unarmoured wooden screw vessel
DateEvent
1 January 1858Completed as screw at Devonport Dockyard.
25 May 1859
- 9 January 1860
Commanded (from commissioning at Devonport) by Captain Charles Frederick Schomberg, Channel squadron
10 January 1860
- 18 February 1861
Commanded by Captain Douglas Curry, Channel squadron
18 February 1861
- August 1862
Commanded by Captain Charles Frederick Alexander Shadwell, Channel squadron, then (November 1861) Mediterranean, then (February 1862) West Indies
19 September 1862Commanded by Captain Peter Cracroft, flagship of Commodore Hugh Dunlop, Receiving ship, Jamaica
6 September 1865
- 21 February 1868
Commanded by Commodore Francis Leopold McClintock, Receiving ship, Jamaica
22 February 1868
- 1 December 1869
Commanded by Commodore Augustus Phillimore, Receiving ship, Jamaica
1 December 1869Commanded by Commodore Richard William Courtenay, Receiving ship, Jamaica
1872Commanded by Commodore Algernon Frederick Rous De Horsey, Receiving ship, Jamaica
1875
- 20 July 1877
Commanded (until paying off) by Commodore Algernon McLennan Lyons, Receiving ship, Jamaica
23 November 1877Sold at Jamaica.
Extracts from the Times newspaper
DateExtract
Ma 15 September 1856The Aboukir, 90, has been taken from her moorings in Hamoaze to the dockyard, Devonport to be docked and fitted with a screw.
Fr 4 September 1857Her Majesty's paddlewheel transport Rhadamanthus sailed from Woolwich yesterday for the west, laden with steam machinery for the 90 screw steamship Aboukir, the 50 screw steam frigate Melpomene, and other ships under construction at Devonport and Pembroke.
Ma 28 September 1857Her Majesty's paddlewheel transport Dee, Master-Commander Thomas Pullen, sailed from Woolwich on Saturday for Devonport, having a full cargo of boilers and steam machinery for the Melpomene and Aboukir, under construction at that and Pembroke yards.
We 18 August 1858Sir John Pakington and the other Lords of the Admiralty left the Diadem in Hamoaze at 10 o'clock on Monday morning, and proceeded to the office of the Admiral-Superintendent, Sir Thomas Pasley, in Devonport Dockyard. From 11 to half-past 1 was occupied in mustering the artisans, who were relieved from duty for the remainder of the day. The gunboat Redwing was in attendance to convey their Lordships to the breakwater in Plymouth Sound, but in consequence of the unsettled state of the weather their inspection on Monday was confined entirely to the dockyard. In building slip No. 1 is the screw steam vessel Pantaloon, 10, in frame. No. 2 is vacant. In No. 3 is the Narcissus, 50-gun screw. She was designed for a sailing vessel, and was nearly built in slip No. 2, when it was determined to lengthen and convert her into a steamer. She was therefore, about 12 months since, taken down in pieces, and rebuilt in the present slip, which is larger. In No. 4 is the Java, 20, screw, just begun framing [???; no Royal Navy ship of this name]. In No. 5 slip is the Donegal, 101, screw, seven-eighths built. She will be launched towards the close of September. In dock No. 1 is the Cumberland, 70 guns, docked on the 12th inst., having been ashore, and carried off her false keel in South America. In No. 2 dock is the Liberian schooner Lark, 2, which has been eight years on service on the coast of Africa for survey. As her repairs will cost over 2,000£., and she will then be but an old ship, it is supposed that the Admiralty rather than incur that expense will present the Liberian Government with another vessel. In No. 3 is the sixth-rate sailing ship Creole, 26, forwarding for commission. No. 4 contains the Gannet, 11, screw, preparing for the steam reserve; and No. 5 the second-rate sailing ship Lion, 80, altering to a screw. In the basin is the Topaz, 50, screw, preparing for the steam reserve. Alongside the dockyard are the Aboukir, 90, screw, and the St. Jean d'Acre, 101, screw, both preparing for the steam reserve. The latter will replace the Orion. The Lords of the Admiralty dined in tha evening with Admiral Superintendent Sir John [should be: Thomas] Pasley, after which they patronized a ball at St. George's-hall, Stonehouse, in support of the funds of the Naval and Military Orphan Asylum at Stoke. The official dinner will be given at Bates's Royal Hotel, Plymouth, this (Wednesday) evening, and the levee held in Devonport dockyard to-morrow morning.
Th 17 February 1859The screw steamship Aboukir, 90, was masted at Devonport on Tuesday
Ma 21 February 1859The screw steamship Aboukir, 90, was placed alongside the dockyard at Devonport, on Wednesday. Several divisions of riggers and seamen riggers are actively employed preparing her for sea.
Ma 28 February 1859The screw steamship Aboukir, 90, was towed up Hamoaze on Thursday, and placed in the steam reserve.
Tu 3 May 1859The screw steamship Aboukir is ordered to be put in the first-class steam reserve at Devonport, in place of the Exmouth, 90.
Ma 9 May 1859The Aboukir, 90, was towed down on Saturday from Hamoaze to Devonport to got her yards and other spars on board, for the purpose of being further advanced.
We 25 May 1859The screw steamship Aboukir, 90, was undocked at Devonport on Monday, and moored to the jetty; she is to be prepared immediately for commission.
Fr 27 May 1859The screw steamship Aboukir, 90, was put in commission at Devonport, on Wednesday afternoon.
Sa 18 June 1859The new steamship Aboukir, 90, Capt. Schomberg, was moved on Thursday from the Devonport dockyard to moorings in the stream, Hamoaze.
Tu 28 June 1859The screw steamship Aboukir, 90, Capt. Schomberg has been ordered to proceed from. Hamoaze into Plymouth Sound.
Fr 1 July 1859The screw steamship Aboukir, 90, Capt. Schomberg, got up steam in Hamoazea on Wednesday, and went outside the Breakwater, and then returned into the Sound.
Sa 2 July 1859The screw steamship Aboukir, 90, Capt. Schomberg, in Plymouth Sound, received her powder on Thursday.
Th 7 July 1859The crew of the screw steamship Aboukir, 90, Capt. Schomberg, were paid wages at Plymouth on Tuesday.
Sa 9 July 1859The screw steamship Aboukir, 90, Capt. Schomberg, got up steam on Thursday, and left Plymouth Sound for Portland.
Ma 18 July 1859The screw line-of-battle ships Royal Albert, 121, bearing the flag of Sir Charles Fremantle; James Watt, 91; Algiers, 91; Hero, 91; the screw-frigate Mersey, 40; and the despatch gunboat Flying Fish, 6, arrived at Portland under steam on Friday morning after a few days cruise in the Channel. The other ships at anchor at Portland are the Agamemnon, 91; Aboukir, 91; Emerald, 51; Blenheim, 60 ; and the gun-boats Pioneer, 6, and Biter, 2.
Tu 26 July 1859His Royal Highness the Prince Consort, accompanied by Prince Alfred and Prince Arthur, arrived in the Royal yacht Victoria and Albert at noon yesterday on a visit of inspection to the extensive defensive and other important works in connexion with the new harbour at Portland. A portion of the Channel fleet, consisting of the Royal Albert, Agamemnon, James Watt, Algiers, and Emerald, which had shortly before left the harbour for Spithead, saluted the Royal party on passing. On the yacht rounding the extremity of the outer breakwater the ships at anchor - Aboukir, Blenheim, Topaze, Melpomene - also saluted. Their Royal Highnesses, on landing, were received by Mr. Coode, engineer-in-chief, and Mr. Leather, contractor for the breakwater, who conducted them over the works now in progress. After the inspection the Royal party returned on board the Victoria and Albert, which immediately left the harbour for Osborne.
We 24 August 1859At half-past 6 o'clock on Saturday evening Her Majesty's ship Nile steamed out of Cork harbour with the intention of joining the Channel squadron at Spithead. It is thought likely that she will henceforth form portion of the squadron, and that the Hawke will continue for some time longer to hold the post of guardship in Queenstown.
The screw steam despatch vessel Flying Fish, 6, Commander C. Hope, arrived at Plymouth on Monday, from the Channel fleet. The screw steamship Caesar, 90, Capt. T.H. Mason, got up steam on Monday morning, and in the afternoon left Plymouth Sound to join the Channel fleet, which, it is said, will cruise as far west as Ushant.
The scrow steamships Aboukir, 91, the Topaz, 51, and the Melpomene, 51, left Portland harbour on Sunday, to join the Channel fleet, which was cruising a few miles from the harbour. The Edgar, 91, the Impérieuse, 51, and the Blenheim, 60, remain in port.
Th 8 September 1859THE CHANNEL FLEET.- Torbay has been again honoured during the past week with a visit from the Channel fleet. On Wednesday the Melpomene, 51, Capt. Ewart; Diadem, 32, Capt. W. Moorsom, C.B.; and the screw despatch gunboat Flying Fish, 6, Commander Hope, arrived in the bay from the westward. On inquiry it was learnt that a day or two before the fleet encountered a very heavy westerly gale in the chops of the Channel, in which the Diadem sprang her mainyard, and that with the vessels above-named she was detached from the squadron and ordered to rendezvous at Torbay. Early on Friday morning they were rejoined by the remainder of the fleet. The vessels were discerned in the offing standing in for the bay in splendid order. They consisted of the Royal Albert, 121, Capt. E.B. Rice, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, K.C.B.; the James Watt, 91, Capt. E. Codd; the Algiers, 91, Capt. G.W.D. O'Callaghan; the Caesar, 90, Capt. T.H. Mason; the Agamemnon, 91, Capt. T. Hope; the Aboukir, 91, Capt. F. Schomberg; the Nile, 91, Capt. A.P.E. Wilmot; the Hero, 91, Capt. G.W. Seymour, C.B.; the Emerald, 51, Capt. A. Cumming; the Topaz, 51, Capt. the Hon. W.S. Spencer; and the Imperieuse, 50, Capt. John J.B.E. Frere. At noon the whole of the ships had come to an anchor about midbay. It was a noble sight to the spectator ashore to witness these magnificent specimens of naval architecture taking up their respective positions. Thousands of persons were, as on the last occasion, attracted to the quays, and the bay has been every day studded with boats and steamers conveying excursionists around the vessels. By the kindness of the commanders the ships were again, subject to necessary regulations, thrown open to the public, and during the whole of the specified hours an immense number of visitors have availed themselves of the privilege. The Diadem and the Flying Fish got under way on Saturday morning and proceeded to Plymouth, but the rest still remain at anchor.
Ma 12 September 1859The Channel fleet was off Plymouth on Saturday afternoon. At half-past 3 o'clock they were under steam only 3½ miles south of the Mewstone coming from the eastward, and led by the Royal Albert; they then edged in towards the Breakwater, under jibs and spankers only; wind, N. by W. The ships afterwards paid off towards the south, and at 5 o'clock were four or five miles east of the Eddystone, under steam only, apparently going down Channel. The fleet consisted of the flagship, the Royal Albert, 121, Rear. Admiral Sir Charles Freemantle; the Algiers, 91, Capt. George W.D. O'Callaghan; the James Watt, 91, Capt. Edward Codd; Caesar, 90, Capt. Thomas H. Mason; Hero, 91, Capt George H. Seymour; Mersey, 40, Capt. Henry Caldwell, C.B.; Nile, 90, Capt. Arthur P.E. Wilmot, C.B.; Aboukir, 90, Capt. Charles F. Schomberg; Agamemnon, 91, Capt. Thomas Hope; Topaze, 51, Capt. Hon. W.S. Spencer; Emerald, 51, Capt. Arthur Cumming; Flying Fish, 6, Commander Charles W. Hope; and Melpomene, 50, Capt. Charles J.F. Ewart.
Sa 17 September 1859The Channel fleet entered Plymouth Sound yesterday (Friday). It consists of the flagship Royal Albert, 121, Rear-Admiral Sir C. Fremantle; the Hero, 91, Captain Sir G.J. Brooke; the Algiers, 91, Captain O'Callaghan; the Agamemnon, 91, Capt. Wilson [this would seem to be an error, Thomas Hope was captain at this time]; the Caesar, 90, Capt. Mason; the Emerald, 50, Capt. Cumming; the James Watt, 91, Capt. E. Codd; the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Schomberg; and the Topazee, 50, Capt. Spencer. The ships hove in sight about 9 a.m.; the Admiral entered at 11; the last ship at 2 p.m.; the flagship parted her bower cable in the Sound; the Melpomene and the Mersey parted company from the rest of the fleet at sea.
Ma 3 October 1859None of the ships belonging to the Channel fleet have left Plymouth during the last week, and there is no present prospect of a combined movement by Admiral Fremantle, who is Commander-in-Chief of the port daring the temporary absence of Vice-Admiral Sir Barrington Reynolds, K.C.B. In the meantime indications which would pass unnoticed under other circumstances, are now observed with interest both on board and on shore; the officers know, if possible, less than the townsmen. The flag ship, Royal Albert, 121, Capt. B. Rice, went from the Sound on Wednesday into Hamoaze, and, with all her armament on board, was placed in dock at Devonport. The copper was stripped off near the aperture of her shaft, and that part of the ship was caulked and recoppered; her bends were also caulked. She was undocked on Saturday. The corners of her fans will probably be reduced. Her crew of 1,000 men are considered good. Some of them are absent on leave until the 7th inst. Strong gales from the southward, accompanied by heavy rains, have recently prevailed, and have compelled the fleet in the Sound to strike top-gallant-masts and make all snug. The state of the weather has most likely prevented the departure of the screw steamship Caesar, 90, Capt. Thomas H. Mason; for some days the davits have been ready to get up her anchors, and she has been otherwise prepared. The blue Peter was flying on Saturday, and 10 or 12 officers and about 60 men, for various ships in the Mediterranean, have embarked. The officers of the Caesar are requesting to have their letters addressed in the first instance to Gibraltar. According to present information she will remain two years on the station; she was commissioned in June, 1853. The Caesar sailed yesterday (Sunday) morning, at 10 o'clock, It will be recollected that, some 10 days since, the Lords of the Admiralty issued orders to prepare for foreign service the James Watt, 91, Capt. Edward Codd, and the Agamemnon, 91, Capt. Thomas Hope. These ships continue ready. The James Watt is bound for the Mediterranean, and has received stores for the Orion and other ships there. The destination of the Agamemnon is uncertain; it is not thought now that she will follow the James Watt; some of her officers have just received leave of absence for a week. The Nile, 90, Capt. A.B. Wilmot, C.B, has a good crew of 850 men, many of whom are from Liverpool; about five months since she supplied 80 to the Doris, and shortly after, 90 to the Algiers. It is expected that the Nile will return to Queenstown, where her crew will probably be reduced to 350. The screw steam frigate Emerald, 50, Capt. Arthur Cumming has a crew of 550, which is less than her complement; it is supposed that she will winter at Sheerness. The Mersey, 40, Capt. Caldwell, C.B., has a complement of 560, chiefly "young fellows," who hope to be paid down at Portsmouth, and to pass the winter there. No preparations for sea are making on board the Diadem, 32, Capt. William Moorsom, C.B. The screw steam gun-vessel Flying Fish, 6, Commander Hope, went outside the harbour on Thursday to try her machinery, which has been recently repaired at Keyham steam yard. The Aboukir, Hero, Melpomene, Topaze, and Virago, complete the Channel fleet. Very few men have volunteerd for the expedition to China.
Ma 10 October 1859Yesterday (Sunday) there were in Plymouth Sound ships of war belonging to five different nations, a circumstance said to be unprecedented.- The English ships of the line Aboukir, Algiers, Donegal, Hero, and Nile; frigates Diadem, Emerald, Melpomene, Mersey, and Topaze; corvette Pearl; the Dutch frigate Admiral Koopman, and sloops Vesuvius and Rainier; the Russian sloop Razboynik; the Brazilian corvette Bahiana; and the Turkish line-of-battle ship Shadie. In all 17 pennants. The whole of the ships, with the exception of the Brazilian corvette, have steam power.
Th 13 October 1859The following screw steamships, forming part of the Channel fleet, in Plymouth Sound, were ordered on Tuesday to prepare for sea immediately: viz., the Donegal, 101, Capt. William F. Glanville; the Emerald, 50, Capt. Arthur Cumming; the Melpomene, 50, Capt. Charles J.F. Ewart; the Mersey, 40, Capt. Henry Caldwell, C.B.; the Algiers, 91, Capt, George W.D. O'Callaghan; the Hero, 81, Capt. George H. Seymour; and the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Charles S. Schomberg. The Nile and Melpomene will probably go to the West Indies, and the Hero to Vancouver's Island.
The screw steam corvette Pearl, 21, Capt. Borlase, C.B., left Plymouth on Monday night for China. As she passed through the Sound her crew was cheered most lustily by the crews of the Channel fleet.
Sa 15 October 1859At 8 a.m. on Thursday Rear Admiral Elliott hoisted his flag (blue at the mizen) on board the screw steamship Hero, 90, Capt. Seymour, in Plymouth Sound, and took command of the fleet. His flag was saluted by the Dutch and Brazilian ships of war in the Sound. At noon the Aboukir, Capt. Schomberg, tripped her anchor and was followed in succession by the Hero, 90, Capt. Seymour; Algiers, 91, Capt. G. O'Callaghan; Trafalgar, 91, Capt. Fanshawe; and Donegal, 101, Capt. G. Glanville, under steam, and by the Mersey, 40, Capt. H. Caldwell, C.B,; Melpomene, 60, Capt. Ewart; and Emerald, 51, Capt. A, Cumming, under canvas. The last ship left at 5 p.m. One report states that the squadron will cruise ten days and return to Plymouth, another that they will rendezvous at Queenstown.
Th 20 October 1859The following ships of the Channel fleet arrived in Cork Harbour on Saturday:- Donegal, 101, screw steamer; Aboukir, 90, screw steamer; Hero, 91, screw steamer; Trafalgar, 120; Algiers, 91, screw steamer; Emerald, 51, screw steamer; Melpomene, 50, screw steamer; and Mersey, 40 screw steamer.
Sa 12 November 1859The Algiers, 91, screw, Capt. George D. O'Callaghan, arrived at Spithead from Portland yesterday.
The ships remaining in Portland Harbour are:- the Royal Albert, 131; the Hero, 91; the Aboukir, 91; the Mars, 81; the Blenheim, 61; the Mersey, 40; the Emerald, 51; and the Melpomene, 51.
The screw steamshlp Trafalgar, 91, from Portland, arrived in Plymouth Sound yesterday morning.
We 7 December 1859The screw line-of-battle ship Algiers, 91, rejoined the Channel Fleet at Portland on Sunday. The vessels now at anchor there are the Royal Albert, 131 (flag ship); Hero, 91; Aboukir, 91; Algiers, 91; Trafalgar, 91; Mars, 80; Mersey, 40; Diadem, 32; Blenheim, 60; Donegal, 101; Partridge, 6; and the Biter, 2.
Th 19 January 1860The screw line-of-battle ships in Portland harbour are the Edgar, 91, flagship of Rear-Admiral Erskine, second in command of the Channel fleet; Donegal, 101; Hero, 91; Algiers, 91; Trafalgar, 91; Aboukir, 91; and the Mars, 80. The screw frigate Diadem, 32; the screw corvette Mutine, 18; and the gunboats Flying Fish, 6; and the Partridge, 2. The paddlewheel steam frigate Prometheus, 6, and the Coastguard ship Blenheim are also at anchor. The Royal Albert, 121, is daily expected from Plymouth.
Fr 2 March 1860A letter dated Torbay, Tuesday, received at Plymouth, from one of the officers of the Channel squadron, says that off the Lizard the ships were taken all aback, and could not again form a line. The Edgar, Queen, and Donegal remained out. Besides the casualties to the Queen, Diadem, Algiers, and Mersey, already reported in The Times, the letter states that the Aboukir lost her cross-jack yard and starboard quarter-boats, the Royal Albert pitched her jib-boom under at times, and the Trafalgar lost her jib-boom; she will probably call at Plymouth before proceeding to the Tagus.
We 4 April 1860A portion of the Channel Fleet, consisting of the screw steamships Royal Albert, 121, Capt. Henry J. Lacon, bearing the flag of Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, K.C.B.; the Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadhead; the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Charles F. Schomberg; and the screw steam-frigate Melpomene, 51, Capt. Charles J.F. Ewart, hove in sight at Plymouth about 6 o'clock yesterday (Tuesday) morning, with the wind from the westward, a smart breeze. They came in from sea under their three topsails, and on reaching the west end of the breakwater took in all canvas, and proceeded under steam to the anchorage ground, the flagship taking her position well to the westward. At 8 o'clock the flag of Port Admiral Sir Barrington Reynolds, K.C.B., was honoured by a salute, which was acknowledged by the Impregnable, 104, Capt. Stewart, in Hamoaze. This portion of the Channel fleet left Lisbon on Friday, March the 23d, in company with the screw steamships Edgar, 91, Capt. James E. Katon; Algiers, 91, Capt. George W.D. O'Callaghan; Queen, 86, Capt. Charles F. Hillyar; Mars, 80, Capt. James N. Strange; and the screw steam-frigate Mersey, 40, Capt. Henry Caldwell, C.B. The Edgar carried away her main topsailyard on Sunday morning, when crossing the Bay of Biscay. The Edgar and Mersey have lost a man each overboard. On Monday night, off the Lizard, the Edgar, Algiers, Queen, Mars, and Mersey parted company, and proceeded up Channel for Portsmouth. Very fine weather was experienced at first, but within the last four days strong gales from west-north-west have prevailed, with extraordinary heavy seas. All the ships are reported leaky; the Royal Albert will require a thorough caulking. Two Dutch ships of war were in the Tagus.
Fr 25 May 1860The Channel fleet, consisting of the Conqueror, 101; the Donegal, 101; the Algiers, 91, the Aboukir, 91; the Trafalgar, 91; the Centurion, 80; the Mars, 80; and the Diadem, 32, left Portland harbour on Wednesday afternoon for a cruise in the Channel. The Blenheim, 60, is the only ship of war now at Portland.
Ma 25 June 1860The Channel squadron, after an anchorage of 15 days in St. Margaret's Hope, Firth of Forth, left its moorings on Saturday afternoon, and under canvass, with auxiliary steam power, proceeded down the Firth and stood out to sea. The squadron, in passing the narrow straits at Queensferry, proceeded in single line, the leading ships being the Royal Albert, 121, flagship of Vice-Admiral Sir C. Fremantle, the Mersey, 40-gun frigate, the Edgar, 91, flagship of Rear-Admiral Erskine, and the Donegal, 101, followed by seven other ships of the line and the Diadem frigate. The Greyhound corvette, 17, accompanied the Royal Albert as a tender. On passing Inchkeith, and getting into the outer bay of the Firth, the fleet formed in two lines, and stood out south-west in the direction of St. Abb's Head; the Royal Albert, the Donegal, the Aboukir, the Conqueror, and the Centurion, with the Greyhound forming the south line, and the Edgar, the Trafalgar, the Algiers, the Mars, the Diadem, and the Mersey, the north line. A number of steamers convoyed the fleet down the Firth, The public enthusiasm excited by the visit o£ the Channel squadron in the Forth can scarcely fall to give a stimulus to the service in the south-east of Scotland, where for many years a fleet of war-ships had not been seen; and great disappointment is felt that the fleet has not been able to make the tour of the north of Scotland and Ireland, as was anticipated. It was expected that the squadron would reach Yarmouth-roads yesterday afternoon.
Ma 2 July 1860On Saturday the Channel fleet arrived In Yarmouth Roads. The squadron, which has been engaged in target practice in the North Sea during the past week, consists of the Royal Albert, 120; Conqueror, 101; Donegal, 101; Algiers, 91; Edgar, 91; Aboukir, 91; Trafalgar, 91; Centurion, 80; Mars, 80; Mersey, 40; Diadem, 32; Ariadne, 26; and Flying Fish, 6. The fleet is not expected to remain in Yarmouth Roads more than three or four days, as it is to take part in a naval review before the departure of his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales for Canada.
Tu 10 July 1860

HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE PRINCE OF WALES.

PLYMOUTH, MONDAY AFTERNOON.

Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle's Channel squadron, consisting of the flagship Royal Albert, 121, Captain Henry J. Lacon; the Donegal, 101, Captain Henry Broadhead; the Aboukir, 90, Captain Douglas Curry; the Greyhound, 17, Commander Francis W. Sullivan; the Conqueror, 101, Captain Edward S. Sotheby, C.B.; the Trafalgar, 90, Captain Edward G. Fanshawe ; the Centurion, 80, Captain Henry G. Rogers, C.B.; the Edgar, 91, Captain James E. Katon; the Algiers, 91, Captain George W.D. O'Callaghan; the Mersey, 40, Captain Henry Caldwell, C.B.; and the Diadem, 32, Captain James H. Cockburn, under canvas only, with a smart breeze a little to the southward of east, hove in sight from Mount Wise at half-past 8 o'clock this morning in two lines. They then formed one line, and stood in for the port. At half-past 10 o'clock the ships wore in succession, and went away to the westward. Shortly after they came in sight more to the southward. Their funnels are up ready for use. The only ship likely to enter the Sound is the Diadem, which is said to be short of fuel. The Earl of Mount-Edgcumbe, in his steam yacht, near the Royal William Victualling-yard, is waiting the approach of the Prince of Wales. The Hero continues inside the Breakwater ready for sea, and arrangements are made for the expected departure of his Royal Highness to-morrow (Tuesday) morning. Her escort, the Ariadne, will probably take the Osborne in tow. The Flying Fish has gone on to Newfoundland.


(BY ELECTRIC AND INTERNATIONAL TELEGRAPH.)

PLYMOUTH, MONDAY EVENING.

Sir Charles Fremantle's squadron, which arrived off the port this morning, formed two lines, ranging about north and south, in the afternoon to receive the Royal yacht, which hove in sight at 7 o'clock, and was saluted by the Impregnable and other ships in Hamoaze. On rounding the west-end of the Breakwater the yardarms of the Hero, St. George, Emerald, and Ariadne, in the Sound, were manned, and the three last-named and the Plymouth Citadel saluted. At half-past 8, when the Prince left the yacht to join the Hero, the Emerald and the Citadel repeated the compliment. The weather is extremely fine, and thousands of the inhabitants were assembled on the heights.

Fr 13 July 1860Two of Sir Charles Fremantle'a squadron - viz., the screw steamship Donegal, 101, Capt. S. Broadhead, and the Aboukir, 90, Capt. D. Curry, dismasted two fishing smacks on Tuesday, when, they were escorting his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales down Channel.
The screw steamsloop Greyhound, 17, Commander Francis W. Sullivan, which returned to Plymouth from the Channel squadron on Tuesday evening, has some defects to make good. She is ordered to prepare for foreign service - the Mediterranean, it is said.
Tu 11 September 1860

REVIEW OF THE CHANNEL FLEET.

The fleet, having all got under way by about 8 a.m., stood out to sea from Milford Haven, and, having made an offing of about seven miles, the Osborne, which had previously joined, with the Lords of the Admiralty on board, made the signal for the fleet to form a double line. They accordingly broke into two divisions; the starboard one, consisting of the Royal Albert, 121; the Donegal, 101; the Conqueror, 101; the Mars, 80, and the Trafalgar, 91, was led by Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, K.C.B., in the Royal Albert. The port division, under Rear-Admiral Erskine, in the Edgar, 91, which was leading, comprised also the Algiers, 91; the Aboukir, 91; the Centurion, 80; the Mersey, 40; and the Diadem, 32. This manoeuvre having been executed with great precision, the Osborne signalled for the fleet to make sail under easy canvass, followed by an order from the Admiral to bank up the fires. Having stood on thus for some time, the two divisions tacked in succession to the starboard, after which the order was given to form a single line of battle. This was effected by the starboard division standing on its course, and the port one tacking until they came into line, when they followed in the wake of their predecessors, an interval of two cables' length separating each ship. The concluding and most exciting manoeuvre of the day was then made by the whole getting orders to make all sail that could be done with safety, and running before the wind. Studdingsail booms were then run out, and every inch of canvass both alow and aloft that would draw was set. The order was then given to make for the nearest port, on which the fleet bore up for Milford Haven. The Osborne then steamed up to the Admiral's ship, and Rear-Admiral Pelham, C.B., hailed Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, K.C.B., and expressed, on the part of his Grace the Duke of Somerset and the rest of the Lords, the extreme satisfaction they all felt, not only in the appearance of the fleet, but also in the admirable precision with which all the manoeuvres had that day been performed, and we believe Capt. Ramsay, C.B., the superintendent of Pembroke Dockyard, was commissioned to convey the above opinion in writing to the Admiral of the fleet. The Osborne then parted company, - the Royal Albert giving the Lords of the Admiralty a salute of 19 guns, which the Osborne acknowledged by dipping her ensign, after which she stood to the southward, it being their Lordships' intention to inspect some important works in progress at the Scilly Isles, and afterwards proceed to Devonport to inspect the dockyard at that place. Nothing could be more favourable than the weather; it was slightly hazy up to 8 o'clock a.m., when it cleared up, and a fine fresh breeze came from the north-east, which lasted up to 3 o'clock p.m., when it died away. The whole of the signalling was done by bunting, and not by Ward's new system, as was generally supposed that it would be, and the brilliant flags had a very pretty effect as rapidly repeated by every third ship. As the fleet entered the harbour the Admiral made the signal for all the ships to take up their old berths, and by 6 o'clock p.m., all were in their original positions.

The Lords of the Admiralty previous to leaving Pembroke-dock granted the employés the usual half-holyday for Saturday.

Th 13 September 1860Pursuant to orders received on Sunday last, the Channel fleet, consisting of the Royal Albert, 121, Capt. H.J. Lacon, flagship of Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, K.C.B., commanding the Fleet; the Conqueror, 101, Capt. Edward S. Sotheby, C.B.; the Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadhead; the Edgar, 91, Capt. James E. Katon, flagship of Rear-Admiral John E. Erskine; the Mars, 80, Capt. James F. Strange; the Trafalgar, 91, Capt. Edward G. Fanshawe; the Algiers, 91, Capt. George W.D, O'Callaghan; the Centurion, 80, Capt. Henry D. Rogers, C.B.; the Aboukir, 91, Capt. Douglas Curry; the Mersey, 40, Capt. Henry Caldwell, C.B.; and the Diadem, 32, Capt. James H. Cockburn, got steam up by daybreak on Tuesday last, and sailed from Milford Haven at about 10 o'clock a.m. They are bound for a cruise of three weeks or a month, and it is supposed will go round the Western Islands, after which they are to rendezvous at Torbay, previous to going into winter quarters. Mr Ward is on board the Admiral's ship with his new system of ocean telegraphs, which are to be thoroughly tried during the cruise. The fleet has been in Milford Haven for more than three weeks, and the conduct of the men has been most exemplary. The civil authorities have not had to interfere except in one or two exceptional cases of drunkenness, together with a few cases of the not very heinous crime of overstaying leave. Rumour has it that three or four vessels of the fleet are to winter at Milford. A more secure berth could not be found in any case.
Fr 5 October 1860It is expected that the screw steamship Aboukir, 90, Captain Douglas Curry, which arrived in Plymouth Sound on Wednesday with the Royal Albert, the Conqueror, and the Centurion, will have to go up Hamoaze to be repaired. During the recent cruise the fleet has been engaged in the usual routine of naval evolutions, and the discipline of the ships has been fully tested. Under canvas only the Edgar is said to be the best. The Conqueror has been repeatedly complimented by Admiral Freemantle for her smart appearance and efficiency. Complaint is made that the Commercial Code of signals which has been recently introduced, and is of great value, appears to receive no proper attention from the merchant vessels met by the ships of the fleet. During the cruise Ward's night signals have been tested, and have proved very valuable. Admiral Bethune's signals were also tried; they are useful only at short distances.
The officers of the Steam Reserve Department of Woolwich Dockyard yesterday went down to Greenhithe for the purpose of accompanying Her Majesty's screw steam gunvessel Landrail, 5, Commander Wilson [should probably be Martin], down the measured mile, on a trial of her new engines, supplied by Mr. Humphreys, of Deptford. The trial having been perfectly satisfactory, the Landrail proceeded on her way to Portsmouth to join the Channel Squadron, and will ultimately proceed to the West Indies.
Sa 20 October 1860Vice-Admiral of the Blue Sir Charles Howe Fremantle, K.C.B., in command of the Channel squadron, is expected to return with the fleet to Portland to-morrow (Wednesday). The following is a list of the ships, guns, horse-power, and tons' burden, together with the names of the officers and number of men composing the fleet: - Vice-Admiral Sir C. H. Fremantle, K.C.B., Commander; Rear-Admiral J.B. Erskine, Second in Command; Rear-Admiral R.F. Stopford, Captain of the Fleet:-
ShipsGunsComplementHorse powerTonsCommanders
Royal Albert1211,0505003,726Capt H.J. Lacon
Donegal1019308003,245" H. Broadhead
Conqueror1009308003,265" E.S. Sotheby, C.B.
Edgar918606003,094" J.E. Katon
Trafalgar908605002,900" E.G. Fanshawe
Algiers918506003,340" G.W.D. O'Callaghan
Aboukir908304003,091" D. Curry
Centurion807504003,590" H.D. Rogers, C.B.
Mersey405941,0003,733" H. Caldwell, C.B.
Diadem324758002,475" J.H. Cockburn
Partridge2 60233Tender to Royal Albert.
Total8388,3295,53031696 
Tu 6 November 1860That portion of the Channel squadron stationed at Plymouth are reefing studding-sail gear, and making other preparations for proceeding to Lisbon. It is reported that the flagship Royal Albert may sail to-day.
The Centurion, 80, Capt. H.D. Rogers, received her powder on Friday afternoon.
On Monday morning the riggers of the Devonport dock-yard were admitted before the usual hour, for the purpose of unmooring the screw steamship Aboukir, 90, Capt. Douglas Curry, which will then be taken from Hamoaze into the Sound; she received her powder when in the inner harbour. The despatch of these ships to the Tagus was unexpected at Plymouth.
The Emerald, 51, screw, Capt. Arthur Cumming, sailed from Spithead early on Sunday morning for Plymouth Sound and Lisbon.
We 7 November 1860Rear-Admiral Robert F. Stopford's port division of the Channel squadron, in Plymouth Sound, received orders on Monday evening to prepare for sailing yesterday (Tuesday) morning for Lisbon; and the ships were supplied by Mr. W.F. Collier, the Portuguese Vice-Consul, with bills of health for that city,- a course not frequently observed. They consist of the flagship Royal Albert, 12l, Capt. Henry D. Lacon, Conqueror, 101, Capt. E.S. Sotheby, C.B.; Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadhead; Aboukir, 90, Capt. Douglas Curry; Centurion, 80, Capt. H.D. Rogers, C.B.; and Emerald, 51, Capt. Arthur Cumming. At an early hour yesterday (Tuesday) morning, they picked up their small bower anchors, and at 11 o'clock fires were lighted under the boilers of the Royal Albert and Aboukir. At 1 p.m. the ships were detained for despatches. At 2 the Conqueror, Centurion, and Donegal left the Sound under canvas, and the Royal Albert and Aboukir under steam. They would soon put out their fires, as the wind continues strong from the eastward. The Emerald hauled down her blue-peter at 11, and will not sail with the rest, but remain at Plymouth for the stragglers, of whom there are about 200 on shore without leave.
Fr 21 December 1860The flagship Royal Albert, 121, Capt. Henry Lacon; the Conqueror, 101, Capt. Edward S. Sotheby, C.B.; the Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadhead; the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Douglas Curry; and the Emerald, 51, Capt. Arthur Cumming, which left Lisbon on the 10th inst., entered Plymouth Sound yesterday. They were under canvas until Monday, when steam was got up, in order to arrive by the time appointed. Fine weather was experienced until Wednesday evening, when a heavy squall carried away the Emerald's mainyard close off in the slings. The Centurion, 80, Capt. Henry B. Rogers, C.B., will remain up the Tagus until the arrival from Gibraltar of the St. Jean d'Acre, 101, Capt. Thomas P. Thomson, which she will supply with provisions, and then join the Channel squadron at Plymouth. The crews are all healthy.
Sa 22 December 1860The mainmast of the flagship Royal Albert, 121, at Plymouth, is said to have sustained damage on the passage out to Lisbon, owing to the mainstay having given way.
The ships in the Sound, belonging to the Channel squadron, discharged their powder yesterday morning. Admiral Stopford's ship, the Royal Albert, 121, Capt. Henry J Lacon; the Conqueror, 101, Capt. Edward S. Sotheby, C.B., and the Donegal, 101, Capt. Broadhead, went up Hamoaze; the Aboukir and the Emerald are likely to follow.
Ma 24 December 1860The screw steamship Aboukir, 90, Capt. Douglas Curry and the screw steam frigate Emerald, 51, Capt. Arthur Cumming, went on Saturday afternoon from Plymouth Sound into Hamoaze.
The mainmast of the screw steamship Royal Albert, 121, at Devonport, is decayed. Her sails were sent to the Devonport Dockyard on Saturday. The crew are paid down, and granted 21 days' absence on leave. It is probable the crews of the Centurion, Donegal, Aboukir, and the Emerald will also be paid down, and that they will be provided with passages to the home ports.
Tu 1 January 1861The port division of the Channel squadron will probably continue some time at Plymouth. The screw steamship Royal Albert, 121, 850-horse power, is in Hamoaze; Admiral Stopford and Capt. Lacon are both on leave, and so is a large portion of her crew, who were paid down on the 23d ult. Her mainmast, reported to be defective, is stripped, and ready for inspection this week. There is some gossip at Devonport about transferring her crew to the Howe, which carries the same number of guns, but has a superiority of 150 horses in her engines, which are of 1,000-horse power. The masts of the Howe are not yet on board. The crew of the screw steam-frigate Emerald, 51, Capt. Arthur B. Cumming, do not expect to leave Hamoaze before April. The Aboukir, 90, Capt. Douglas Curry, has, it is said, been ashore, and will therefore most likely be docked in Keyham steam-yard. The Conqueror, 101, Capt. Edward S. Sotheby, will be placed in dock on account of the defective condition of her valves. The Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadhead, is also in Hamoaze. When in the Tagus a valuable seaman lost his life. He was one of the ship's corporals, and had been absent on duty by night. When alongside he took two lanterns in each hand, stepped from the boat on to the stage or platform, walked overboard, and was unfortunately drowned. It appears that while the Donegal was at Lisbon her side ladder was drawn up by night. When this is done it is the duty of some one to fasten a rope across the opening left. On the night in question the rope was omitted to be fastened; hence the loss of the life of a valuable petty officer while attending to the service of his ship.
Th 11 April 1861The screw steamship Centurion, 80. Capt. H.D. Rogers, C.B., the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Douglas Curry, and the Hero, 91, Capt. Alfred P. Ryder, were appointed to leave Hamoaze yesterday afternoon, and go into Plymouth Sound. The Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadhead, will probably follow to-day, and the Conqueror, 101. Capt. Edward S. Sotheby, to-morrow. The ships belonging to the Plymouth division of the Channel Fleet have sent up their lower yards and topmasts. Nearly all arrived at Plymouth on the 20th of December last.
Fr 19 April 1861It appears that the Princess Royal, 91, grounded on the Winter Shoal in Plymouth Sound on Tuesday afternoon, not in endeavouring to go to the westward, but to the northward of that shoal. She should, therefore, have gone nearer to the Citadel before attempting to make for Hamoaze, or else her jib should not have been hoisted. A very few fathoms would have taken her clear of danger. Her rise on the rock was rather understated in The Times of yesterday; instead of one to four feet, it should have been three to five feet - competent authorities say five feet. The diver examined the bottom on Wednesday and brought op a piece of her fore foot, about two feet six inches long; he stated that there are several feet gone. The gunboat Weser having been removed, the Princess Royal is now in No. 3 dock at Keyham Steamyard. However much this accident is to be regretted, it has been the means of bringing under special observation the very efficient condition of that portion of the Channel fleet now at anchor in the Sound. It consists of five screw steamships - viz., the Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadhead, inside the western portion of the breakwater; the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Charles F.A. Shadwell, inside the Camber; the Conqueror, 101, Capt. Edward S. Sotheby, inside both; and the Hero, 91, Capt. Alfred P. Ryder, and the Centurion, 80, Capt. Henry D. Rogers, C.B., yet further in. The officers on duty on board all the ships were apparently watching the Princess Royal. Boats were manned simultaneously. Between the striking of the ship on the rock and the starting of a pinnace from the Donegal with a stream anchor and all appurtenances only four minutes and a half elapsed. Equal activity was manifested by Commander Brown, Master Attendant, and the executive of the Devonport Dockyard, in the despatch of steam tenders and launches. On Wednesday again a boat belonging to the Aboukir was upset in the Sound, but the crew were promptly rescued by assistance from the ships just enumerated.
Ma 22 April 1861When the starboard division of the Channel fleet left Plymouth Sound on Friday afternoon the Hero, 91, took the lead under topsails, topgallant sails, and royals, with. jib and flying jib. She was followed by the Centurion, 80, Aboukir, 90, and the Conqueror, 101, which had her studding sails on. the port side. The senior ship, the Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadband, was under all plain sail; wind, easterly. Port Admiral Sir Houston Stewart and party witnessed the departure of the ships from the steam tender Avon, in the Sound. They are gone to relieve the homeward bound, and are expected again at Plymouth in the course of a week or 16 days.
Th 2 May 1861The screw steamship. Princess Royal, 91, Capt. Charles Fellowes, flag of Rear-Admiral Robert Smart, K.H., in command of the Channel Squadron, was put out of commission at Devonport on Tuesday, the 30th ult., and on Wednesday the screw steamship Revenge, 91, was commissioned to take her place. The crew will be paid wages and granted leave of absence probably on Saturday. The Revenge was removed yesterday morning from No. 3 Dock in Keyham steamyard, and moored in the basin. The gunboats Trinculo and Gleaner were placed in the dock immediately afterwards.
Sa 18 May 1861The division of the Channel fleet which anchored in St. Helen's Roads, from Portland, on Thursday evening, weighed anchor yesterday morning, the Donegal and Hero proceeding under canvas to Spithead, where they anchored, joining Rear-Admiral Erskine's division lying at that anchorage. The three remaining ships - the Conqueror, Aboukir, and Centurion, stood out to sea, also under canvas, bound for Plymouth Sound.
Sa 22 June 1861The Plymouth division of the Channel fleet, under the command of Rear-Admiral Stuart [should be Smart], consisting of the Revenge (flagship), Aboukir, Conqueror, and Centurion, with the steam tender Porpoise, cast anchor in Leith Heads on Thursday morning shortly after midnight. The division had been nearly three days at the mouth of the Firth of Forth, off the Isle of May, cruising about in expectation of meeting the Spithead division (Admiral Erskine's), consisting of the Edgar (flag), Donegal, Trafalgar, and Hero. Up to Wednesday evening the latter division had not been seen, and Admiral Smart gave the signal to proceed up the Firth. While cruising of the Isle of May the ships' crews were busily exercised in artillery and rifle practice at targets moored for the purpose. All Thursday the Plymouth division lay off the Island Of Inchkeith in Leith Roads, and at noon the several ships fired a royal salute in honour of Her Majesty's accession. In the afternoon the ships were ordered to get up steam for the purpose, it was understood, of proceeding up the Firth to St. Margaret's Hope, where both divisions of the Fleet lay for about a fortnight last summer.
Th 27 June 1861Rear-Admiral Erskine's division of the Channel Fleet, consisting of the Edgar, the Hero, and the Trafalgar, joined Admiral Smart's division, composed of the Revenge, the Aboukir, the Conqueror, and the Centurion, in Leith Roads on Saturday evening. It was expected that they should leave that anchorage early on Wednesday morning to proceed northward by the Moray and Pentland Firths, and subsequentlv visit the north of Ireland, and also, it is said, the Clyde.
Sa 6 July 1861THE CHANNEL FLEET AT KIRKWALL.- We are indebted for the following to the Orkney Herald:- "On Saturday morning intelligence reached this place that the seven vessels of the Channel fleet now cruising on the east coast had left Leith, and that their next port of destination, was Kirkwall. On Monday morning intelligence was received that the vessels were tacking about between Tankerness and the south end of the island of Shapinsha, and were moving down towards Kirkwall, the wind being westerly, nearly right ahead; but, as the tide was turning also against them, it was thought they would anchor in some of the bays outside till the evening. However, they kept moving on, led by the Revenge, Admiral Smart's flagship, and it was surprising even to those best acquainted with the rapid cross tides and difficult navigation of these narrow channels how the large war-ships were managed. They moved slowly on, sounding their way, and by half-past 12 the Admiral's ship anchored off Carness Point, in Kirkwall Roads. Half an hour afterwards she was followed by the Aboukir, which anchored to the right or north side of the Revenge. A strong adverse tide, running at the rate of 10 miles an hour, having now set in, the wind also being right against them, the other five vessels anchored in the Bay of Holland; and between 7 and 10 in the evening they all entered the Roads, and anchored to the north and west of the Revenge. The weather continues gusty, wind west, and frequent thick, drizzling showers, some of which came on in the forenoon just when the vessels were passing between Shapinsha and the mainland, and interfered both with the signalling and with the view of the magnificent vessels from the shore. A salute of 13 guns was fired from the fort when the Admiral's ship cast anchor, which was promptly answered by the Revenge. The fleet is expected to remain here till Saturday."
Ma 29 July 1861The Channel Fleet are now anchored in the waters of Loughswilly. On Wednesday they sailed majestically up the Lough on the tide in the form of a crescent. The Londonderry Sentinel gives a graphic description of the scene, which I abridge:-
"No sight could be more beautiful. Crowds collected from many points to witness the magnificent spectacle. These seven wooden walls of old England now displayed their graceful lines, their beautiful symmetry, and gayest bunting to the admiration of hundreds, while the waters of the Lough, as if proud of their freight, reflected their spire-like masts, their thousand flags and streamers, and their stately outlines in the glassy waves beneath. Now the ships are off Dunree Fort, on which the red cross of England unfurls its folds to the wind. As each man-of-war passes a salute is fired, and in the intervals the martial strains of the well-trained bands on board each vessel are borne to the shore. The scene was of the most thrilling description, and its interest was not lessened by the fact that this exhibition of the 'pride, pomp, and circumstance' of the maritime greatness of our country was unattended by the more direful accompaniments of 'glorious war.'
"At half-past 4 the fleet were off Buncrana, having arrived in the following order:-
"The Revenge, 91 guns, 800-horse power, Captain Charles Fellows, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Smart, senior Admiral of the fleet. The Edgar, 91 guns, 600-horse power, Captain Mends, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Erskine (white), second in command. The Conqueror, 101 guns, 200-horse power, Captain Southby, C.B., and Aide-de-Camp to the Queen, The Aboukir, 91 guns, 403-horse power, Captain Shadwell, C.B. The Hero, 91 guns, 600-horse power, Captain Ryder. The Trafalgar, 90 guns, 500-horse power, Captain Dixon. The Centurion, 80 guns, 400-horse power, Captain Rogers, C.B. The Porpoise gunboat, commanded by Lieutenant-Commander John Brasier Creagh, Knight of the Legion of Honour.
"As night set in the shores of tough Swilly were brilliantly lit up with bonfires. The glare brought out the ships into fine relief, affording a spectacle easy to be enjoyed, but difficult to describe. All the inhabitants of Buncrana likewise illuminated their dwellings, and on every side great enthusiasm was witnessed. It was most gratifying to see the cordial reception given by the people of Ennishowen to the fleet, and both officers and men feel much pleased and complimented at the reception they have met with. Perhaps in no other place since they have left Spithead have they received such a hearty welcome, and the short experience had of the members of the fleet gives reason to believe that it will be richly deserved.
"Some idea may be formed of the might and majesty of England's navy, from the fact that these seven vessels carry 636 guns, with crews amounting in number to 6,250 men, being more than the entire population of Strabane The entire horse-power is nominally 4,200, but is equal to double these figures. Three vessels properly belonging to this portion of the fleet are absent on other service - namely, the Donegal, the Diadem, and the Emerald."
This spectacle will produce a profound and lasting impression on the peasantry of Donegal, and the fame of it will spread throughout all the mountains and glens of the west.
We 9 October 1861Rear Admiral Erskine's division of the Channel fleet, consisting of the Edgar, 89 screw (flagship), Capt. George P. Mends; the Hero, 89, screw, Capt. A.P. Ryder; and the Trafalgar, 86, screw, Capt. J.B. Dickson, arrived at Spithead yesterday morning under steam, and brought up in line on reaching the anchorage. The Edgar discharged her powder and shell yesterday at Spithead, preparatory to going into harbour.
The starboard division of the Channel fleet, under Admiral Smart, which left Ireland eight days previously, and arrived at Plymouth yesterday morning (as reported in our second edition), parted company on Saturday evening with the port division, consisting of the Hero, the Edgar, and the Trafalgar, which are bound for Spithead. They entered the Sound in the following order:- The screw steamship Revenge, 89, Capt. Charles Fellowes, flag of Rear-Admiral Robert Smart, K.H., white at the mizen; the Centurion, 80, Capt. Henry D. Rogers, C.B.; the Conqueror, 99, Capt. Edward S. Sotheby, C.B.; and the Aboukir, 86, Capt. Charles F. A. Shadwell, C.B.
Th 10 October 1861The damage sustained by the Channel Fleet during the late severe storm is estimated at 10,000 l. The Conqueror, Centurion, and Aboukir lost all their quarter boats. The Aboukir rolled excessively. The Hero lost her mainyard. The Trafalgar suffered severely. The Conqueror also lost her three topsails; indeed, so much canvas was blown away that when Admiral Stuart [should be Smart] signalled some of the ships to hoist certain sails, the reply given was "that they had none." It is reported at Plymouth that the Centurion and Aboukir are to be sent to the West Indies. The Revenge was removed yesterday from Plymouth Sound into Hamoaze to be repaired. The Conqueror, Centurion, and Aboukir will follow.
We 29 January 1862From Her Majesty's ship Medusa, which left the British Commander-in-Chief on the 5th of January for New York, we learn that the destination of most of the ships on the West India station will be changed in consequence of the pacific tone of the news from Washington. The Mersey, 50, is ordered up to Bermuda; the St. George, 86, carrying His Royal Highness Prince Alfred, is to return home immediately in consequence of the death of the Prince Consort. The Donegal, 100, is to sail for the Gulf of Mexico, to fill the place of the St. George. The Conqueror, 100, will follow in the same direction. The Nile, 90, with the Admiral's flag, was at Bermuda, as well as the Diadem, 32. The Hero, Aboukir, and Emerald, recenly despatched from England, had not yet arrived at Bermuda; in fact, Her Majesty's ship Donegal was the only ship of the Channel fleet which had joined Admiral Milne on the 5th of January.
Sa 1 March 1862According to the Bermuda Royal Gazette, there were at the island, on the 4th of February, the screw steamship Nile, 90, Capt. Barnard, flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Alexander Milne, K.C.B. ; the Hero, 89, Capt. Ryder; the Agamemnon, 89, Capt. Hope; the Aboukir, 86, Capt. Shadwell, C.B. ; the Immortalité, 57, Capt. Hancock; the Diadem, 32, Capt Randolph; the Rinaldo, 17, Commander Hewett; the Terror, 16, Capt. Hutton; the Spiteful, 6, Commander Wilson; the Landrail, 5, Commander Martin; the Nimble, 6, Lieut. D'Arcy; and the gunboats Nettle and Onyx. The Immortalité, from Annapolis, Chesapeake Bay, arrived on the 30th of January, and the Diadem and Landrail from the West Indies on the 1st of February. The last two brought the remainder of the crew of the wrecked ship Conqueror, 90, the bowsprit only of which, is now above water. All the ship's company are berthed on board the hulk Medway, where they will remain until the court-martial, which was appointed to be held on board the Hero on the 6th of February. The crew may arrive in England in March.
Sa 29 March 1862The screw steam frigate Diadem, 32, Capt. Scott, which left Bermuda March 11, arrived in Plymouth Sound on Friday morning. On the 12th of March, in lat. 33 2 N., long. 61 51 W., she took on board the crew of the American brig C.W. Conner, Capt. Joseph Urann, which was bound with a cargo of sundries from Boston for St. Jago. The brig was dismasted on tho 6th of March, and the crew for the previous five days had been living on biscuit only. Moderate weather was experienced during all the passage, excepting on the 21st, when, in lat. 42 45 N., long. 32 29 W., they had a gale of wind from the westward. The Diadem brings home 250 officers and men, the remaining portion of the crew of the Conqueror, lost on Rum Bay Island, in the West Indies, and about 130 invalids, supernumeraries, and passengers, including lieutenant Taylor, 39th Regiment, and Mr. Tucker, late Colonial Aide-de-Camp to the Governor of Bermuda, who is the bearer of the contributions from the island to the Great Exhibition. Mr. Vivian, carpenter of the Terror, died on the 23d, and Peter Kenney, private of Royal Marines, a lunatic, jumped overboard oa the 21st during the gale, and was drowned. The Diadem left at Bermuda the screw steamship Nile, 90, Capt. Edward K. Barnard, flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Alexander Milne, K.C.B.; the screw steamships Aboukir, 86, Capt. Charles F. Shadwell, C.B.; Hero, 89, Capt. Alfred P. Ryder; and Agamemnon, 89; the screw steam frigates Immortalité, 51, Orlando, 50, and Liffey, 51; the screw steam sloop Greyhound, 17; paddlewheel steam sloops Spiteful, 6, and Medea, 6 ; the screw steam sloop Racer, 11; the screw steam gun-vessels Nimble, 5, and Landrail, 5 ; and the floating battery Terror, 16. The screw steamship Adelaide, with troops, arrived at Bermuda March 10. Her fuel was nearly expended.
Top  

 * Home * Loney home * Life & career * Documents * Album * Ships * Portrait * Uniform * Background *
Valid HTML 5.0