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William Loney RN - Background

Home-Loney-Background-The Royal Navy Browse mid-Victorian RN vessels: A; B; C; D; E - F; G - H; I - L; M; N - P; Q - R; S; T - U; V - Z; ??

NameHeroExplanation
Type2nd rate TypeTwo-decker
Launched15 April 1858   
HullWooden Length234 feet
PropulsionScrew Men860
Builders measure3148 tons   
Displacement4765 tons   
Guns91   
Fate1871 Last in commission1862
Class    
Ships bookADM 135/229   
Career
DateEvent
15 April 1858Launched at Chatham Dockyard.
7 March 1859
- 29 April 1859
Commanded (from commissioning at Sheerness) by Captain George Nathaniel Broke, Sheerness (until invalided)
29 April 1859
- 5 January 1861
Commanded by Captain George Henry Seymour, Channel squadron, and (July - November 1860) as Commodore of the squadron taking the Prince of Wales to North America
5 January 1861
- 22 November 1862
Commanded (until paying off at Sheerness) by Captain Alfred Phillipps Ryder, Channel squadron, then North America and West Indies
20 June 1871Sold to Castle for breaking up at Charlton.
Extracts from the Times newspaper
DateExtract
Ma 10 May 1858All the artificers at Sheerness are to be henceforth, until further orders, put on what is termed job and task work on unlimited earnings, and all labourers now employed, whether on the establishment or temporarily hired, whose weekly wages do not amount to 14s. Per week, are to have their pay raised to that sum. All extra time to be paid for. Provisions and stores of every description are ordered to be forthwith taken on board the screw steam guard-ship of ordinary Royal George, 102 guns, Captain Superintendent John C. Fitzgerald, and the screw steam guardship of steam reserve Cressy, 80 guns, Captain Edward P. Halsted, &c. If required for immediate service they are ordered to be manned from the different Coastguard stations attached to their district. The ships now under fitment at Sheerness, in the fitting basin and in dry dock, are the Majestic screw steamship, 80 guns; the Colossus screw steamship, 80 guns; the new screw steamship Hero, 91 guns; the Terrible paddle-wheel steam frigate, 21 guns; the new screw steam frigate Emerald, 51 guns, and sundry gunboats.
Th 9 June 1859The Channel fleet now assembled at Portland consists of the following screw steamships;- Exmouth, 91, Capt. J. Stopford; Hero, 91, Capt. G.H. Seymour, C.B.; James Watt, 91, Capt. E. Codd; Algiers, 91, Capt. G.W.D. O'Callaghan; Cressy, 80, Capt. the Hon. G.J.B. Elliot, C.B.; Mersey, 40. Capt. H. Caldwell, C.B.; Blenheim, 60, Capt. F. Scott. A considerable augmentation, of the fleet is shortly expected.
Sa 18 June 1859The new line-of-battle ship Royal Albert, 121, Captain Rice, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, Commander-in-Chief of the Channel fleet, arrived at Portland harbour on Thursday afternoon at half-??? [unreadable] from Plymouth. On arriving off King's Pier, the Hero, Captain G. H. Seymour, C.B., saluted the gallant ??? with the usual number of guns, which was duly replied to. The Royal Albert came in under steam, and took an excellent position inside the other ships of war at anchor in that magnificent harbour. The fleet now comprises the following ships:- Royal Albert, 121; Hero, ???; James Watt, 91; Algiers, 91; Mersey, 40; Emerald, Blenheim, 60; and the gunboats Flying Fish, 6, and ???.
Fr 1 July 1859The screw line-of-battle ship Agamemnon, 91, Capt. Thomas Hope, arrlved at Portland on Tuesday afternoon from Spithead. Her Majesty's vessels now at anchor in that harbour are the Royal Albert, 121; Hero, 91; James Watt, 91; Agamemnon, 91; Algiers, 91; Emerald, 51; Mersey, 40; Curacoa, 31; Blenheim, 60; Pioneer, 6; Flying Fish, 6; and the Biter, 2.
Fr 8 July 1859The screw line-of-battle ships Royal Albert, 121, Capt. E.B. Rice, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle; the James Watt, 91, Capt. E. Codd; the Hero, 91, Capt. G.H. Seymour, C.B.; the Algiers, 91, Capt. G.W.D. O'Callaghan; the Mersey, 40, Capt. H. Caldwell, C.B.; and the screw despatch gunboat Flying Fish, 6, Commander Hope, left Portland harbour on Wednesday morning for a cruise in the Channel. The Agamemnon, 91, Capt. T. Hope; the Emerald, 31, Capt. Arthur Cumming; the Blenheim, 60, Capt. Scott; and the Pioneer, 6, Commander May, are still at anchor.
Ma 18 July 1859The screw line-of-battle ships Royal Albert, 121, bearing the flag of Sir Charles Fremantle; James Watt, 91; Algiers, 91; Hero, 91; the screw-frigate Mersey, 40; and the despatch gunboat Flying Fish, 6, arrived at Portland under steam on Friday morning after a few days cruise in the Channel. The other ships at anchor at Portland are the Agamemnon, 91; Aboukir, 91; Emerald, 51; Blenheim, 60 ; and the gun-boats Pioneer, 6, and Biter, 2.
Ma 22 August 1859Eight out of the 11 vessels forming that portion of the Channel fleet at Spithead left that anchorage under steam on Saturday. Early in the morning indications were given of their approaching departure; royal yards were crossed, funnels raised, and fires lit. At noon Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Howe Fremantle, K.C.B., embarked on board his barge from the sallyport stairs, and proceeded on board the Royal Albert, which, with the remainder of the squadron, had steam up, and was hove short. It was 3 p.m. before the fleet was fairly under way, the Royal Albert leading as far as the Nab Light, when the Flying Fish, 6, screw, Commander C. W. Hope, was sent ahead of the Royal Albert, and took up her position as look-out vessel to the squadron. Scarcely a ripple was on the water, and a more magnificent sight could not be imagined than the ships presented as they steamed round the east end of the Wight in the order named:- The Flying Fish, screw, 6, Commander C. W. Hope; the Royal Albert, 131, screw, Captain E. B. Rice, bearing the flag (red at the mizen) of Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Howe Fremantle, K.C.B.; the Algiers, 91, screw, Captain G.W.D. O'Callaghan; the James Watt, 91, screw, Captain E. Codd; the Agamemnon, 91, screw, Captain T. Hope; the Hero, 91, screw, Captain G.H. Seymour; the Diadem, 32, screw, Capt. W. Moorsom, C.B.; and the Emerald, 51, screw, Capt. A. Cumming. The Mersey was detained at Spithead on her experimental screw trials, her third attempt at the measured mile on Saturday again proving a failure, owing to the continued priming of her boilers. The ships at present at Spithead comprise the Trafalgar, 91, screw, Capt. E.G. Fanshawe; the Mersey, 40, screw, Capt. H. Caldwell, C.B.; and the Scout, 21, screw, Capt. John Corbett, the above three vessels belonging to the Channel fleet; the Sidon, 22, paddle, Capt. R.B. Crawford, and the Pioneer, 6, screw, Commander Hugh Reilley, both ordered on foreign service, and the Gorgon, 6, paddle, Commander Bedford C. Pim
Th 8 September 1859THE CHANNEL FLEET.- Torbay has been again honoured during the past week with a visit from the Channel fleet. On Wednesday the Melpomene, 51, Capt. Ewart; Diadem, 32, Capt. W. Moorsom, C.B.; and the screw despatch gunboat Flying Fish, 6, Commander Hope, arrived in the bay from the westward. On inquiry it was learnt that a day or two before the fleet encountered a very heavy westerly gale in the chops of the Channel, in which the Diadem sprang her mainyard, and that with the vessels above-named she was detached from the squadron and ordered to rendezvous at Torbay. Early on Friday morning they were rejoined by the remainder of the fleet. The vessels were discerned in the offing standing in for the bay in splendid order. They consisted of the Royal Albert, 121, Capt. E.B. Rice, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle, K.C.B.; the James Watt, 91, Capt. E. Codd; the Algiers, 91, Capt. G.W.D. O'Callaghan; the Caesar, 90, Capt. T.H. Mason; the Agamemnon, 91, Capt. T. Hope; the Aboukir, 91, Capt. F. Schomberg; the Nile, 91, Capt. A.P.E. Wilmot; the Hero, 91, Capt. G.W. Seymour, C.B.; the Emerald, 51, Capt. A. Cumming; the Topaz, 51, Capt. the Hon. W.S. Spencer; and the Imperieuse, 50, Capt. John J.B.E. Frere. At noon the whole of the ships had come to an anchor about midbay. It was a noble sight to the spectator ashore to witness these magnificent specimens of naval architecture taking up their respective positions. Thousands of persons were, as on the last occasion, attracted to the quays, and the bay has been every day studded with boats and steamers conveying excursionists around the vessels. By the kindness of the commanders the ships were again, subject to necessary regulations, thrown open to the public, and during the whole of the specified hours an immense number of visitors have availed themselves of the privilege. The Diadem and the Flying Fish got under way on Saturday morning and proceeded to Plymouth, but the rest still remain at anchor.
Ma 12 September 1859The Channel fleet was off Plymouth on Saturday afternoon. At half-past 3 o'clock they were under steam only 3½ miles south of the Mewstone coming from the eastward, and led by the Royal Albert; they then edged in towards the Breakwater, under jibs and spankers only; wind, N. by W. The ships afterwards paid off towards the south, and at 5 o'clock were four or five miles east of the Eddystone, under steam only, apparently going down Channel. The fleet consisted of the flagship, the Royal Albert, 121, Rear. Admiral Sir Charles Freemantle; the Algiers, 91, Capt. George W.D. O'Callaghan; the James Watt, 91, Capt. Edward Codd; Caesar, 90, Capt. Thomas H. Mason; Hero, 91, Capt George H. Seymour; Mersey, 40, Capt. Henry Caldwell, C.B.; Nile, 90, Capt. Arthur P.E. Wilmot, C.B.; Aboukir, 90, Capt. Charles F. Schomberg; Agamemnon, 91, Capt. Thomas Hope; Topaze, 51, Capt. Hon. W.S. Spencer; Emerald, 51, Capt. Arthur Cumming; Flying Fish, 6, Commander Charles W. Hope; and Melpomene, 50, Capt. Charles J.F. Ewart.
Sa 17 September 1859The Channel fleet entered Plymouth Sound yesterday (Friday). It consists of the flagship Royal Albert, 121, Rear-Admiral Sir C. Fremantle; the Hero, 91, Captain Sir G.J. Brooke; the Algiers, 91, Captain O'Callaghan; the Agamemnon, 91, Capt. Wilson [this would seem to be an error, Thomas Hope was captain at this time]; the Caesar, 90, Capt. Mason; the Emerald, 50, Capt. Cumming; the James Watt, 91, Capt. E. Codd; the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Schomberg; and the Topazee, 50, Capt. Spencer. The ships hove in sight about 9 a.m.; the Admiral entered at 11; the last ship at 2 p.m.; the flagship parted her bower cable in the Sound; the Melpomene and the Mersey parted company from the rest of the fleet at sea.
Ma 3 October 1859None of the ships belonging to the Channel fleet have left Plymouth during the last week, and there is no present prospect of a combined movement by Admiral Fremantle, who is Commander-in-Chief of the port daring the temporary absence of Vice-Admiral Sir Barrington Reynolds, K.C.B. In the meantime indications which would pass unnoticed under other circumstances, are now observed with interest both on board and on shore; the officers know, if possible, less than the townsmen. The flag ship, Royal Albert, 121, Capt. B. Rice, went from the Sound on Wednesday into Hamoaze, and, with all her armament on board, was placed in dock at Devonport. The copper was stripped off near the aperture of her shaft, and that part of the ship was caulked and recoppered; her bends were also caulked. She was undocked on Saturday. The corners of her fans will probably be reduced. Her crew of 1,000 men are considered good. Some of them are absent on leave until the 7th inst. Strong gales from the southward, accompanied by heavy rains, have recently prevailed, and have compelled the fleet in the Sound to strike top-gallant-masts and make all snug. The state of the weather has most likely prevented the departure of the screw steamship Caesar, 90, Capt. Thomas H. Mason; for some days the davits have been ready to get up her anchors, and she has been otherwise prepared. The blue Peter was flying on Saturday, and 10 or 12 officers and about 60 men, for various ships in the Mediterranean, have embarked. The officers of the Caesar are requesting to have their letters addressed in the first instance to Gibraltar. According to present information she will remain two years on the station; she was commissioned in June, 1853. The Caesar sailed yesterday (Sunday) morning, at 10 o'clock, It will be recollected that, some 10 days since, the Lords of the Admiralty issued orders to prepare for foreign service the James Watt, 91, Capt. Edward Codd, and the Agamemnon, 91, Capt. Thomas Hope. These ships continue ready. The James Watt is bound for the Mediterranean, and has received stores for the Orion and other ships there. The destination of the Agamemnon is uncertain; it is not thought now that she will follow the James Watt; some of her officers have just received leave of absence for a week. The Nile, 90, Capt. A.B. Wilmot, C.B, has a good crew of 850 men, many of whom are from Liverpool; about five months since she supplied 80 to the Doris, and shortly after, 90 to the Algiers. It is expected that the Nile will return to Queenstown, where her crew will probably be reduced to 350. The screw steam frigate Emerald, 50, Capt. Arthur Cumming has a crew of 550, which is less than her complement; it is supposed that she will winter at Sheerness. The Mersey, 40, Capt. Caldwell, C.B., has a complement of 560, chiefly "young fellows," who hope to be paid down at Portsmouth, and to pass the winter there. No preparations for sea are making on board the Diadem, 32, Capt. William Moorsom, C.B. The screw steam gun-vessel Flying Fish, 6, Commander Hope, went outside the harbour on Thursday to try her machinery, which has been recently repaired at Keyham steam yard. The Aboukir, Hero, Melpomene, Topaze, and Virago, complete the Channel fleet. Very few men have volunteerd for the expedition to China.
Ma 10 October 1859Yesterday (Sunday) there were in Plymouth Sound ships of war belonging to five different nations, a circumstance said to be unprecedented.- The English ships of the line Aboukir, Algiers, Donegal, Hero, and Nile; frigates Diadem, Emerald, Melpomene, Mersey, and Topaze; corvette Pearl; the Dutch frigate Admiral Koopman, and sloops Vesuvius and Rainier; the Russian sloop Razboynik; the Brazilian corvette Bahiana; and the Turkish line-of-battle ship Shadie. In all 17 pennants. The whole of the ships, with the exception of the Brazilian corvette, have steam power.
Th 13 October 1859The following screw steamships, forming part of the Channel fleet, in Plymouth Sound, were ordered on Tuesday to prepare for sea immediately: viz., the Donegal, 101, Capt. William F. Glanville; the Emerald, 50, Capt. Arthur Cumming; the Melpomene, 50, Capt. Charles J.F. Ewart; the Mersey, 40, Capt. Henry Caldwell, C.B.; the Algiers, 91, Capt, George W.D. O'Callaghan; the Hero, 81, Capt. George H. Seymour; and the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Charles S. Schomberg. The Nile and Melpomene will probably go to the West Indies, and the Hero to Vancouver's Island.
The screw steam corvette Pearl, 21, Capt. Borlase, C.B., left Plymouth on Monday night for China. As she passed through the Sound her crew was cheered most lustily by the crews of the Channel fleet.
Sa 15 October 1859At 8 a.m. on Thursday Rear Admiral Elliott hoisted his flag (blue at the mizen) on board the screw steamship Hero, 90, Capt. Seymour, in Plymouth Sound, and took command of the fleet. His flag was saluted by the Dutch and Brazilian ships of war in the Sound. At noon the Aboukir, Capt. Schomberg, tripped her anchor and was followed in succession by the Hero, 90, Capt. Seymour; Algiers, 91, Capt. G. O'Callaghan; Trafalgar, 91, Capt. Fanshawe; and Donegal, 101, Capt. G. Glanville, under steam, and by the Mersey, 40, Capt. H. Caldwell, C.B,; Melpomene, 60, Capt. Ewart; and Emerald, 51, Capt. A, Cumming, under canvas. The last ship left at 5 p.m. One report states that the squadron will cruise ten days and return to Plymouth, another that they will rendezvous at Queenstown.
Th 20 October 1859The following ships of the Channel fleet arrived in Cork Harbour on Saturday:- Donegal, 101, screw steamer; Aboukir, 90, screw steamer; Hero, 91, screw steamer; Trafalgar, 120; Algiers, 91, screw steamer; Emerald, 51, screw steamer; Melpomene, 50, screw steamer; and Mersey, 40 screw steamer.
Sa 12 November 1859The Algiers, 91, screw, Capt. George D. O'Callaghan, arrived at Spithead from Portland yesterday.
The ships remaining in Portland Harbour are:- the Royal Albert, 131; the Hero, 91; the Aboukir, 91; the Mars, 81; the Blenheim, 61; the Mersey, 40; the Emerald, 51; and the Melpomene, 51.
The screw steamshlp Trafalgar, 91, from Portland, arrived in Plymouth Sound yesterday morning.
We 7 December 1859The screw line-of-battle ship Algiers, 91, rejoined the Channel Fleet at Portland on Sunday. The vessels now at anchor there are the Royal Albert, 131 (flag ship); Hero, 91; Aboukir, 91; Algiers, 91; Trafalgar, 91; Mars, 80; Mersey, 40; Diadem, 32; Blenheim, 60; Donegal, 101; Partridge, 6; and the Biter, 2.
Th 19 January 1860The screw line-of-battle ships in Portland harbour are the Edgar, 91, flagship of Rear-Admiral Erskine, second in command of the Channel fleet; Donegal, 101; Hero, 91; Algiers, 91; Trafalgar, 91; Aboukir, 91; and the Mars, 80. The screw frigate Diadem, 32; the screw corvette Mutine, 18; and the gunboats Flying Fish, 6; and the Partridge, 2. The paddlewheel steam frigate Prometheus, 6, and the Coastguard ship Blenheim are also at anchor. The Royal Albert, 121, is daily expected from Plymouth.
Th 23 February 1860The screw steam frigate Diadem, 32, Capt. James H. Cockburn, arrived at Portland on Tuesday from Portsmouth. A portion of the Channel fleet is expected to leave that harbour in a few days for the Tagus. The vessels now in port are the Royal Albert, 121; Edgar, 91; Queen, 91; Algiers, 91: Donegal, 101; Hero, 91; Trafalgar, 91; Melpomene, 51; Mersey, 40; Diadem, 32; Blenheim, 60; Mutine, 17; Greyhound, 17; Biter, 2; and the Partridge, 2.
Ma 5 March 1860The Hero, 91, screw, Captain George H. Seymour, C.B., which had sailed on Friday from Spithead to join the Channel Fleet, put back to that anchorage on Saturday morning, with the loss of her fore yard, which had been carried away in a heavy squall from the W.S.W. off St. Catharine's at 5 a.m. the same day. The broken yard was towed ashore by the Comet steamtug, and the irons, &c. landed at the dockyard at noon. By 3 p.m. the new yard had been fitted with the irons, leathered, and launched into the water off the King's Stairs, In readiness for towing off to the ship. The Hero again sailed from Spithead at 7 a.m. yesterday, but brought up in St. Helen's Roads, the weather looking wild and unsettled, with a strong breeze from the westward.
We 4 July 1860Rear-Admiral the Hon. Frederick Thomas Pelham, C.B., one of the Lords of the Admiralty, arrived at Devonport on Monday morning, and in the afternoon, accompanied by Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Pasley, Admiral-Superintendent of the Dockyard, went on board the screw steam-ship Hero, 91, Capt. Seymour, where a large party of ladies were assembled. Shortly after steam was got up, and the Hero left Hamoaze and proceeded into Plymouth Sound, where she will probably remain until his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales embarks. It is expected that the Channel fleet will wait outside the port and escort the Hero into the Atlantic.
Tu 10 July 1860

HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE PRINCE OF WALES.

PLYMOUTH, MONDAY AFTERNOON.

Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle's Channel squadron, consisting of the flagship Royal Albert, 121, Captain Henry J. Lacon; the Donegal, 101, Captain Henry Broadhead; the Aboukir, 90, Captain Douglas Curry; the Greyhound, 17, Commander Francis W. Sullivan; the Conqueror, 101, Captain Edward S. Sotheby, C.B.; the Trafalgar, 90, Captain Edward G. Fanshawe ; the Centurion, 80, Captain Henry G. Rogers, C.B.; the Edgar, 91, Captain James E. Katon; the Algiers, 91, Captain George W.D. O'Callaghan; the Mersey, 40, Captain Henry Caldwell, C.B.; and the Diadem, 32, Captain James H. Cockburn, under canvas only, with a smart breeze a little to the southward of east, hove in sight from Mount Wise at half-past 8 o'clock this morning in two lines. They then formed one line, and stood in for the port. At half-past 10 o'clock the ships wore in succession, and went away to the westward. Shortly after they came in sight more to the southward. Their funnels are up ready for use. The only ship likely to enter the Sound is the Diadem, which is said to be short of fuel. The Earl of Mount-Edgcumbe, in his steam yacht, near the Royal William Victualling-yard, is waiting the approach of the Prince of Wales. The Hero continues inside the Breakwater ready for sea, and arrangements are made for the expected departure of his Royal Highness to-morrow (Tuesday) morning. Her escort, the Ariadne, will probably take the Osborne in tow. The Flying Fish has gone on to Newfoundland.


(BY ELECTRIC AND INTERNATIONAL TELEGRAPH.)

PLYMOUTH, MONDAY EVENING.

Sir Charles Fremantle's squadron, which arrived off the port this morning, formed two lines, ranging about north and south, in the afternoon to receive the Royal yacht, which hove in sight at 7 o'clock, and was saluted by the Impregnable and other ships in Hamoaze. On rounding the west-end of the Breakwater the yardarms of the Hero, St. George, Emerald, and Ariadne, in the Sound, were manned, and the three last-named and the Plymouth Citadel saluted. At half-past 8, when the Prince left the yacht to join the Hero, the Emerald and the Citadel repeated the compliment. The weather is extremely fine, and thousands of the inhabitants were assembled on the heights.

We 11 July 1860

DEPARTURE OF THE PRINCE OF WALES.

PLYMOUTH, JULY 10.

The screw steamship Hero, 91, Captain George H. Seymour, C.B., with his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, and the screw steam frigate Ariadne, 26, Captain Edward W. Vansittart, weighed anchor in the Sound at 7 o'clock this morning, and shortly after sailed for Quebec. On leaving the port the Prince was saluted by the screw steamship St. George, 91, Captain the Hon. F. Egerton; the screw steam frigate Emerald, 51, Captain Arthur Cuming; by the Artillery in Plymouth Citadel, and by the Cornish Royal Volunteers from a field battery near the ruins of Mount-Edgcumbe-park. About a league and a half south-east of the Eddystone the Hero was joined by Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Fremantle's Channel squadron; wind, easterly; very light. It is understood that the squadron, after escorting the Prince part of the way across the Atlantic, will return to Bantry Bay, and, having already visited the capital of Scotland, there is some probability of their going afterwards to Dublin.

Th 11 April 1861The screw steamship Centurion, 80. Capt. H.D. Rogers, C.B., the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Douglas Curry, and the Hero, 91, Capt. Alfred P. Ryder, were appointed to leave Hamoaze yesterday afternoon, and go into Plymouth Sound. The Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadhead, will probably follow to-day, and the Conqueror, 101. Capt. Edward S. Sotheby, to-morrow. The ships belonging to the Plymouth division of the Channel Fleet have sent up their lower yards and topmasts. Nearly all arrived at Plymouth on the 20th of December last.
Fr 19 April 1861It appears that the Princess Royal, 91, grounded on the Winter Shoal in Plymouth Sound on Tuesday afternoon, not in endeavouring to go to the westward, but to the northward of that shoal. She should, therefore, have gone nearer to the Citadel before attempting to make for Hamoaze, or else her jib should not have been hoisted. A very few fathoms would have taken her clear of danger. Her rise on the rock was rather understated in The Times of yesterday; instead of one to four feet, it should have been three to five feet - competent authorities say five feet. The diver examined the bottom on Wednesday and brought op a piece of her fore foot, about two feet six inches long; he stated that there are several feet gone. The gunboat Weser having been removed, the Princess Royal is now in No. 3 dock at Keyham Steamyard. However much this accident is to be regretted, it has been the means of bringing under special observation the very efficient condition of that portion of the Channel fleet now at anchor in the Sound. It consists of five screw steamships - viz., the Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadhead, inside the western portion of the breakwater; the Aboukir, 90, Capt. Charles F.A. Shadwell, inside the Camber; the Conqueror, 101, Capt. Edward S. Sotheby, inside both; and the Hero, 91, Capt. Alfred P. Ryder, and the Centurion, 80, Capt. Henry D. Rogers, C.B., yet further in. The officers on duty on board all the ships were apparently watching the Princess Royal. Boats were manned simultaneously. Between the striking of the ship on the rock and the starting of a pinnace from the Donegal with a stream anchor and all appurtenances only four minutes and a half elapsed. Equal activity was manifested by Commander Brown, Master Attendant, and the executive of the Devonport Dockyard, in the despatch of steam tenders and launches. On Wednesday again a boat belonging to the Aboukir was upset in the Sound, but the crew were promptly rescued by assistance from the ships just enumerated.
Ma 22 April 1861When the starboard division of the Channel fleet left Plymouth Sound on Friday afternoon the Hero, 91, took the lead under topsails, topgallant sails, and royals, with. jib and flying jib. She was followed by the Centurion, 80, Aboukir, 90, and the Conqueror, 101, which had her studding sails on. the port side. The senior ship, the Donegal, 101, Capt. Henry Broadband, was under all plain sail; wind, easterly. Port Admiral Sir Houston Stewart and party witnessed the departure of the ships from the steam tender Avon, in the Sound. They are gone to relieve the homeward bound, and are expected again at Plymouth in the course of a week or 16 days.
Th 2 May 1861The screw steamship. Princess Royal, 91, Capt. Charles Fellowes, flag of Rear-Admiral Robert Smart, K.H., in command of the Channel Squadron, was put out of commission at Devonport on Tuesday, the 30th ult., and on Wednesday the screw steamship Revenge, 91, was commissioned to take her place. The crew will be paid wages and granted leave of absence probably on Saturday. The Revenge was removed yesterday morning from No. 3 Dock in Keyham steamyard, and moored in the basin. The gunboats Trinculo and Gleaner were placed in the dock immediately afterwards.
Sa 18 May 1861The division of the Channel fleet which anchored in St. Helen's Roads, from Portland, on Thursday evening, weighed anchor yesterday morning, the Donegal and Hero proceeding under canvas to Spithead, where they anchored, joining Rear-Admiral Erskine's division lying at that anchorage. The three remaining ships - the Conqueror, Aboukir, and Centurion, stood out to sea, also under canvas, bound for Plymouth Sound.
Ma 27 May 1861Rear-Admiral J.E. Erskine's division of the Channel fleet, now lying at Spithead, comprising the Edgar, 91, screw, Capt. G.P. Mends (flag); the Donegal, 101, screw, Capt. Sherard Osborn, C.B.; the Hero, 91, screw, Capt. A.P. Ryder; the Flying Fish, 6, screw, Commander W.H. Anderson; and the Diadem, 32, screw, Capt. J.H. Cockburn, have received their orders for sea, and are expected to sail from Spithead on the termination of the courts martial now being held on board Her Majesty's ship Victory at Portsmouth.
Sa 22 June 1861The Plymouth division of the Channel fleet, under the command of Rear-Admiral Stuart [should be Smart], consisting of the Revenge (flagship), Aboukir, Conqueror, and Centurion, with the steam tender Porpoise, cast anchor in Leith Heads on Thursday morning shortly after midnight. The division had been nearly three days at the mouth of the Firth of Forth, off the Isle of May, cruising about in expectation of meeting the Spithead division (Admiral Erskine's), consisting of the Edgar (flag), Donegal, Trafalgar, and Hero. Up to Wednesday evening the latter division had not been seen, and Admiral Smart gave the signal to proceed up the Firth. While cruising of the Isle of May the ships' crews were busily exercised in artillery and rifle practice at targets moored for the purpose. All Thursday the Plymouth division lay off the Island Of Inchkeith in Leith Roads, and at noon the several ships fired a royal salute in honour of Her Majesty's accession. In the afternoon the ships were ordered to get up steam for the purpose, it was understood, of proceeding up the Firth to St. Margaret's Hope, where both divisions of the Fleet lay for about a fortnight last summer.
Th 27 June 1861Rear-Admiral Erskine's division of the Channel Fleet, consisting of the Edgar, the Hero, and the Trafalgar, joined Admiral Smart's division, composed of the Revenge, the Aboukir, the Conqueror, and the Centurion, in Leith Roads on Saturday evening. It was expected that they should leave that anchorage early on Wednesday morning to proceed northward by the Moray and Pentland Firths, and subsequentlv visit the north of Ireland, and also, it is said, the Clyde.
Ma 29 July 1861The Channel Fleet are now anchored in the waters of Loughswilly. On Wednesday they sailed majestically up the Lough on the tide in the form of a crescent. The Londonderry Sentinel gives a graphic description of the scene, which I abridge:-
"No sight could be more beautiful. Crowds collected from many points to witness the magnificent spectacle. These seven wooden walls of old England now displayed their graceful lines, their beautiful symmetry, and gayest bunting to the admiration of hundreds, while the waters of the Lough, as if proud of their freight, reflected their spire-like masts, their thousand flags and streamers, and their stately outlines in the glassy waves beneath. Now the ships are off Dunree Fort, on which the red cross of England unfurls its folds to the wind. As each man-of-war passes a salute is fired, and in the intervals the martial strains of the well-trained bands on board each vessel are borne to the shore. The scene was of the most thrilling description, and its interest was not lessened by the fact that this exhibition of the 'pride, pomp, and circumstance' of the maritime greatness of our country was unattended by the more direful accompaniments of 'glorious war.'
"At half-past 4 the fleet were off Buncrana, having arrived in the following order:-
"The Revenge, 91 guns, 800-horse power, Captain Charles Fellows, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Smart, senior Admiral of the fleet. The Edgar, 91 guns, 600-horse power, Captain Mends, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Erskine (white), second in command. The Conqueror, 101 guns, 200-horse power, Captain Southby, C.B., and Aide-de-Camp to the Queen, The Aboukir, 91 guns, 403-horse power, Captain Shadwell, C.B. The Hero, 91 guns, 600-horse power, Captain Ryder. The Trafalgar, 90 guns, 500-horse power, Captain Dixon. The Centurion, 80 guns, 400-horse power, Captain Rogers, C.B. The Porpoise gunboat, commanded by Lieutenant-Commander John Brasier Creagh, Knight of the Legion of Honour.
"As night set in the shores of tough Swilly were brilliantly lit up with bonfires. The glare brought out the ships into fine relief, affording a spectacle easy to be enjoyed, but difficult to describe. All the inhabitants of Buncrana likewise illuminated their dwellings, and on every side great enthusiasm was witnessed. It was most gratifying to see the cordial reception given by the people of Ennishowen to the fleet, and both officers and men feel much pleased and complimented at the reception they have met with. Perhaps in no other place since they have left Spithead have they received such a hearty welcome, and the short experience had of the members of the fleet gives reason to believe that it will be richly deserved.
"Some idea may be formed of the might and majesty of England's navy, from the fact that these seven vessels carry 636 guns, with crews amounting in number to 6,250 men, being more than the entire population of Strabane The entire horse-power is nominally 4,200, but is equal to double these figures. Three vessels properly belonging to this portion of the fleet are absent on other service - namely, the Donegal, the Diadem, and the Emerald."
This spectacle will produce a profound and lasting impression on the peasantry of Donegal, and the fame of it will spread throughout all the mountains and glens of the west.
Tu 1 October 1861A portion of the Channel fleet is expected shortly at Plymouth to make good defects. The screw steamship Hero, 89, Capt Alfred P. Ryder, has lost canvas, and some of the others are deficient of spars. There is a dock vacant at Keyham Steamyard should any of the ships require docking.
We 2 October 1861

Dublin, Monday

Six ships of the Channel Fleet are at Berehaven. The others, namely, the Hero and the Trafalgar, are expected immediately. They experienced very heavy weather at sea during the week, having sustained some damage and lost several of their boats. A correspondent of the Cork Constitution says:-
"I most sincerely hope that a rumour circulated concerning the Hero and the Conqueror is not correct, or that it may prove, at most, an exaggeration of the facts - that when reefing sails 50 of the former and 10 of the latter ship's crew were swept off the yards and found a watery grave. Already the harbour for miles around teems with life, for, independent of the ships' boats gliding along from one to another vessel, or towards the shore with despatches, boats from the town and coast, plied with might and main, swarm around the leviathans, either delivering supplies or soliciting orders. Business is astir, - bakers, grocers, butchers, cabmen, ponies, bumboats, &c., are in requisition. In anticipation of this state of things commercial travellers from Cork and elsewhere have been receiving orders freely for some days past. Our post-office disgorged about 7,000 letters and papers this evening, and received from on board a return supply for circulation through the length and breadth of the land. On former occasions the men of the fleet remitted by post-office orders, to their friends and families, some tens of thousands of pounds. It is expected that business will be done to an equal extent in this way now."
We 9 October 1861Rear Admiral Erskine's division of the Channel fleet, consisting of the Edgar, 89 screw (flagship), Capt. George P. Mends; the Hero, 89, screw, Capt. A.P. Ryder; and the Trafalgar, 86, screw, Capt. J.B. Dickson, arrived at Spithead yesterday morning under steam, and brought up in line on reaching the anchorage. The Edgar discharged her powder and shell yesterday at Spithead, preparatory to going into harbour.
The starboard division of the Channel fleet, under Admiral Smart, which left Ireland eight days previously, and arrived at Plymouth yesterday morning (as reported in our second edition), parted company on Saturday evening with the port division, consisting of the Hero, the Edgar, and the Trafalgar, which are bound for Spithead. They entered the Sound in the following order:- The screw steamship Revenge, 89, Capt. Charles Fellowes, flag of Rear-Admiral Robert Smart, K.H., white at the mizen; the Centurion, 80, Capt. Henry D. Rogers, C.B.; the Conqueror, 99, Capt. Edward S. Sotheby, C.B.; and the Aboukir, 86, Capt. Charles F. A. Shadwell, C.B.
Th 10 October 1861The damage sustained by the Channel Fleet during the late severe storm is estimated at 10,000 l. The Conqueror, Centurion, and Aboukir lost all their quarter boats. The Aboukir rolled excessively. The Hero lost her mainyard. The Trafalgar suffered severely. The Conqueror also lost her three topsails; indeed, so much canvas was blown away that when Admiral Stuart [should be Smart] signalled some of the ships to hoist certain sails, the reply given was "that they had none." It is reported at Plymouth that the Centurion and Aboukir are to be sent to the West Indies. The Revenge was removed yesterday from Plymouth Sound into Hamoaze to be repaired. The Conqueror, Centurion, and Aboukir will follow.
We 29 January 1862From Her Majesty's ship Medusa, which left the British Commander-in-Chief on the 5th of January for New York, we learn that the destination of most of the ships on the West India station will be changed in consequence of the pacific tone of the news from Washington. The Mersey, 50, is ordered up to Bermuda; the St. George, 86, carrying His Royal Highness Prince Alfred, is to return home immediately in consequence of the death of the Prince Consort. The Donegal, 100, is to sail for the Gulf of Mexico, to fill the place of the St. George. The Conqueror, 100, will follow in the same direction. The Nile, 90, with the Admiral's flag, was at Bermuda, as well as the Diadem, 32. The Hero, Aboukir, and Emerald, recenly despatched from England, had not yet arrived at Bermuda; in fact, Her Majesty's ship Donegal was the only ship of the Channel fleet which had joined Admiral Milne on the 5th of January.
Sa 1 March 1862According to the Bermuda Royal Gazette, there were at the island, on the 4th of February, the screw steamship Nile, 90, Capt. Barnard, flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Alexander Milne, K.C.B. ; the Hero, 89, Capt. Ryder; the Agamemnon, 89, Capt. Hope; the Aboukir, 86, Capt. Shadwell, C.B. ; the Immortalité, 57, Capt. Hancock; the Diadem, 32, Capt Randolph; the Rinaldo, 17, Commander Hewett; the Terror, 16, Capt. Hutton; the Spiteful, 6, Commander Wilson; the Landrail, 5, Commander Martin; the Nimble, 6, Lieut. D'Arcy; and the gunboats Nettle and Onyx. The Immortalité, from Annapolis, Chesapeake Bay, arrived on the 30th of January, and the Diadem and Landrail from the West Indies on the 1st of February. The last two brought the remainder of the crew of the wrecked ship Conqueror, 90, the bowsprit only of which, is now above water. All the ship's company are berthed on board the hulk Medway, where they will remain until the court-martial, which was appointed to be held on board the Hero on the 6th of February. The crew may arrive in England in March.
Sa 29 March 1862The screw steam frigate Diadem, 32, Capt. Scott, which left Bermuda March 11, arrived in Plymouth Sound on Friday morning. On the 12th of March, in lat. 33 2 N., long. 61 51 W., she took on board the crew of the American brig C.W. Conner, Capt. Joseph Urann, which was bound with a cargo of sundries from Boston for St. Jago. The brig was dismasted on tho 6th of March, and the crew for the previous five days had been living on biscuit only. Moderate weather was experienced during all the passage, excepting on the 21st, when, in lat. 42 45 N., long. 32 29 W., they had a gale of wind from the westward. The Diadem brings home 250 officers and men, the remaining portion of the crew of the Conqueror, lost on Rum Bay Island, in the West Indies, and about 130 invalids, supernumeraries, and passengers, including lieutenant Taylor, 39th Regiment, and Mr. Tucker, late Colonial Aide-de-Camp to the Governor of Bermuda, who is the bearer of the contributions from the island to the Great Exhibition. Mr. Vivian, carpenter of the Terror, died on the 23d, and Peter Kenney, private of Royal Marines, a lunatic, jumped overboard oa the 21st during the gale, and was drowned. The Diadem left at Bermuda the screw steamship Nile, 90, Capt. Edward K. Barnard, flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Alexander Milne, K.C.B.; the screw steamships Aboukir, 86, Capt. Charles F. Shadwell, C.B.; Hero, 89, Capt. Alfred P. Ryder; and Agamemnon, 89; the screw steam frigates Immortalité, 51, Orlando, 50, and Liffey, 51; the screw steam sloop Greyhound, 17; paddlewheel steam sloops Spiteful, 6, and Medea, 6 ; the screw steam sloop Racer, 11; the screw steam gun-vessels Nimble, 5, and Landrail, 5 ; and the floating battery Terror, 16. The screw steamship Adelaide, with troops, arrived at Bermuda March 10. Her fuel was nearly expended.
Tu 29 April 1862

LOSS OF THE SHIP CONQUEROR

The following Admiralty memorandum, dated the 20th ult., revises the sentence of the court-martial, held at Bermuda, on the captain and officers of Her Majesty's late ship the Conqueror:-
"My Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty have had under their consideration the minutes of the proceedings and the sentence of a court-martial held on board Her Majesty's ship Hero, at Bermuda, on the 8th, and by successive adjournments to the 15th day of February, 1852, for the trial of Captain Edward Southwell Sotheby, C.B., the remaining officers, and ship's company of Her Majesty's late ship Conqueror, for the loss of that ship on the reef on the eastern side of Rum Cay, on the 29th of December, 1861.
"My Lords have read with much surprise a passage in Captain Sotheby's defence, where he observes :-
"'If, after the scrutinizing test that the master's work has undergone, it should be found incorrect; proper allowance not made; or the place of the ship not properly noted in the chart, I maintain, in which opinion, I have no doubt, I shall have the fall concurrence of the members of this Court, that a captain is not supposed to doubt the accuracy of such work, when he can conscientiously place most thorough confidence in the master; and that it is not his duty, under those circumstances, to work the reckoning himself, that officer being appointed for that specific purpose."
"My Lords cannot dissent in too strong terms from the views expressed by Captain Sotheby. They consider that it is the duty of the captain to take every precaution for the safety of the ship he commands, and that he can only acquit himself of that responsibility which attaches to him by showing that he has neglected no means within his power, of ascertaining the position of the ship, the prevailing currents, and the dangers to which she may be exposed.
"My Lords further regret that Captain Sotheby's views appear to have been accepted by the members of the Court without remark, and to have been so far adopted by them, that while they reprimanded the master, they fully acquitted the captain. My lords cannot concur in the finding of the Court.
"One of Her Majesty's ships, in fine weather and under no unusual circumstance, while making a passage through a channel in which the currents are known to set to leeward with varying strength, has been totally lost in consequence, according to the finding of the Court, of an insufficient allowance for leeway and current. The captain is, nevertheless, fully acquitted, and the master only reprimanded, though no reason is given why the ship should have continued all night on a course which the master acknowledged might carry her within six or seven miles of an island surrounded by dangerous coral reefs.
"It appears to their Lordships that, had the ordinary and natural precaution been adopted of making a tack to the south-east, before the ship could by possibility have been swept upon the coral reefs of Rum Cay, the country would not have had to deplore the loss of one of the finest line-of-battle ships in Her Majesty's service; and my Lords consider Captain Sotheby to have been highly culpable in not having taken that precaution.
"To prevent all future misconception as to the responsibility of captains in command of Her Majesty's ships, my Lords have caused the following additions to be made in the 1st and 2d Articles of Chapter XIX., page 160, of the Queen's Regulations and Admiralty Instructions for the government of Her Majesty's Naval Service. The first Article will commence with the words- 'The captain is responsible for the safe conducting and steering of the ship; and the last paragraph of the second Article will in future stand as follows :- 'If it shall appear that the ship has been run on shore, or brought into danger of being run on shore or wrecked, and that there has been any want of due care or precaution, or that the foregoing orders have been disobeyed, the captain will be held responsible for the same.'
"By command of their Lordships,
"C. PAGET."

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