The 1853 Royal Naval review
The 1853 Royal Naval review


The Royal Navy
The Royal Navy


To gain conservative Catholic support at home, the French president, Napoleon III, in 1850 put pressure on the Sublime Porte - the government of the Ottoman empire, Turkey - to increase the influence of the Roman Catholic Church in the management of Christian Holy Places in Palestine, then part of that empire. This was opposed by the Russian Czar, Nicholas, who supported the Orthodox Christians there. Nicholas decided to use this crisis to increase his influence in the Ottoman empire, and in May 1853 he sent Prince Menschikoff to Constantinople to demand "substantial and permanent guarantees on behalf of the Orthodox Church", an impossible demand which would have meant an end to Ottoman independence. Diplomatic relations between the two countries were broken off and Russian troops occupied the Ottoman provinces of Moldavia and Wallachia (the "Danubian principalities") at the end of July. War between Turkey and Russia was now inevitable. After Russia destroyed the Turkish fleet at Sinope on 30 November, Britain and France became increasingly alarmed by the threat of Russian annexation of the Ottoman empire. When Russia ignored an Anglo-French ultimatum to withdraw from the Danubian principalities, Britain and France declared war in March 1854.

On 11 August 1853, shortly after the occupation of the Danubian Principalities, Queen Victoria conducted a review of a Royal Navy fleet at Portsmouth, at which Czar Nicholas's two eldest daughters, Maria Nikolayevna and Olga Nikolayevna - who happened to be in England to the time - were honoured guests.


Extracts from the Times newspaper
DateExtract
??????? 
??????? 
??????? 
??????? 
??????? 
??????? 
??????? 
??????? 
(continued)
??????? 
??????? 
??????? 
($ThisDate, 6, 2) . ' ' . $MyDateString; if (substr($MyDateString,0,1) == '0') $MyDateString = substr($MyDateString, 1); return $MyDateString; } } ?>

Top↑
Top↑

Valid HTML 5.0